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Title: Sunday Herald, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 63,582 items from Sunday Herald, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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H.M.A.S. SYDNEY IS A LUXURY SHIP Australia's 14,000- ton aircraft- carrier, H.M.A.S. Sydney, will sail from Britain for home ports next month. London staff correspondent, Ian Fawcett, on board the ship recently, wrote this article about her for "Sunday Playtime" readers. [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

H.M.A-S. SYDNEY IS A LUXURY SHIP Australia's 14,000 - ton aircraft - carrier, H.M.A.S. Sydney, will sail from Britain for home ports next month. London staff cor- respondent, Ian Fawcett, on board the ship recently, wrote this article about her for "Sunday Playtime" readers. AUSTRALIAN seamen' who .**- did the first trials on the new aircraft-carrier, H.M.A.S. Sydney, had only one complaint to make. vvna mat, tney said, was not seri- ous. It was '"only that the bread buttering machine did not lay on the "butter thick enough for us." In comparison with the condi- tions on the majority of naval vessels-even some of those built H.M.A.S. Sjdney, 14,000-ton aircraít-carrier. during the last war-Svdney is a home-away-from-home Its captain, Captain Dowling D S O . cho-.e the colour scheme for the mess decks himsell And the men tn the Sydney like it. They like the new idea of hav- ing meals in one place and sleep- ing in another. "It's great," said one of the lads "It's a far more natural e...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Biggles Gets His Men [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

Biggies Gets His Men I Air Commodore Raymond, As- ! sistant Commissioner of Police at I New Scotland Yard, summons J Sgt. Bigglesworth fo his office. Ha I fells Biggies that the British Gov- i ernment is worried over the dis- ) appearance of some English and I Canadian defence eaperls who are j believed to be held prisoner Î somewhere in central Asia. ¡ Biggies agrees to search for the j missing eirparts. I "VtfTHAT are the mosquitoes ** like?" Bertie asked the Chinese expert, Captain Mayne, suspiciously. "Pretty grim," admitted Mayne Even worse is a big red bug known locally as a gnu*. In places they make life a misery I came out looking as though I'd had a bad go of smallpox " / "How long were you there9" asked Ginger "About six months " ' What were the natives like the real natives9" 'Not bad I got on well enough That, no doubt, was partly due to the fact that 1 hand- ed over to them most of the game J shot. Moreover, the fellow 1 had with me as a guide knew the people well, and ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
American Bid For Indonesian Trade From Our Staff Correspondent [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

American Bid For Indonesian Trade From Our Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON. Feb. S-The U.S. State Depart ment is concerned about the part American businessmen are playing in the "American Indonesia Corporation." The Corporation, an American-1 registered trading company, is heavily financed by an American group who own 51 per cent, of its stock. The remainder is in the hands of the Indonesian Republican Government, four of whose Ministers are on the Corporation's board. For nearly a year, the Corpora- tion has been smuggling token shipments of goods through the Dutch blockade into Indonesia. This American-controlled Cor- poration has a contract with the Republican Government. Its terms 'are so far-reaching that if the Republicans came to power in Indonesia, the Corpora- tion would have exclusive rights to all buying and selling in the U.S. by the Republican Govern- ment. The major figure behind the Corporation is a 37-year-old ex Hollywood executive, Mr. Mat- thew Fox. ' In October, 1...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BUSINESS CIRCLES WORRIED [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

BUSINESS CIRCLES WORRIED Chicago meat prices were drop- ping yesterday, and staples, like flour, lard, and soap, were cut at wholesale by large producers. | The movement downward in commodities was assisted by a variety of extraneous, circum- stances. For instance, the blizzards in the west caused livestock owners lo rush animals- to the slaughter yards, and the fall in maize prices was due, in part, to the increase in grain supplies throughout the world. Associated . Press says in its nationwide economic review, issued yesterday, that the persis- tent and steady decline in com- modity prices is beginning to worry the American business community seriously. Most economists, business lead- ers, and forecasters at the end of 1948 predicted a continuation of the general high level of activitv for at least the first half of 1949', although everyone agreed that "the bloom was off the boom." The Associated Press com- modity index of 35 weighted wholesale prices has dropped to 169.4 (base p...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Candid Comment... By ONLOOKER [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

(gandid Comment . . . By ONLOOKER "TF the family does not leave ?*? Australia voluntarily, I shall put them out." There is no mistaking the accent. It is CalweUian through and through. I One feels a trifle sorry for Arthur Augustus. Just as the bouquets begin to pile up on his brave and vigorous handling of immigration, along comes the O'Keefe case, and the brickbats fiy. Even tie local priest-at Chelsea (V) has flung one at a faithful son of the Church. Mr. Calwell says that in expelling the Indonesian Mrs. O'Keefe and her eight children C'a godless and un-Chnstian action": Father Fitzpat- rick) he is simply the instrument of Cabinet policy, that all the coloured war-time refugees must go. Maybe. But considerable discre- tion as to time and circumstances vests in a Minister. The timing of this ejection is appalling. Asia rings with our praises as the Great White Friend of the oppressed Indonesians -and we serve notice to quit on a lone Indonesian woman and her children. The Dutch m...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JUVENILES MUST QUIT STAGE SHOW [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

JUVENILES MUST QUIT STAGE SHOW Two juvenile artists, Fred Norton, jil, and Leonie Scarlett, 13, must be withdrawn from J. C. Williamson's production, "Annie, Get Your Gun." There is a ban in New South I Wales on children under 15 years of age appearing in stage shows. "Annie Get Your Gun" has been showing for five months at the Royal Theatre. "Within a week we must find a 15-year-old boy and girl, under normal size, to take the parts of Little Nell and Little Jake," said the producer, Mr. C. Randell. "Leonie has been with the show since it opened in Melbourne l8 months ago. "For her age, she is the clever- est little stage girl I have met," said Mr. Randell. Leonie, a Melbourne girl, was allowed to leave the theatre after the first act so she would be in bed before 10 p.m. Fred Norton has been playing Little Jake for six weeks. Mr. Randell said an audition yesterday did not produce a child to' full requirements. "They were all too big. We want two who are undersize," he added.'

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITHGOW GIRL DEFEATS CHAMPION [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

LITHGOW GIRL DEFEATS CHAMPION Marjorie Jackson, 17-year-old Lithgow typist (left), de- feating the Olympic champion, Fanny Blankers-Koen, in a 100-metres race at the Sydney Sports Ground yesterday afternoon. The time, 11.8s, easily bettered the Australian record, and was one-tenth of a second better tharf the Dutchwoman's time when she won the Olympic sprint final at Wembley. (See Page 21.)

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Thrills At Women's Athletic Carnival Dutch Star Wins Hurdles By 12 Yards LITHGOW GIRL'S AMAZING TIME [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

Thrills At Women's 'Athletic Carnival , Dutch Star Wins Hurdles By 12 Yards -4 LITHGOW GIRL'S AMAZING TIME By TOM GOODMAN Mrs. Fanny Blankers-Koen was sensationally beaten by 17-year-old Lithgow typiste Marjorie Jackson in the 100 metres invitation race at the Sydney Sports Ground yesterday. Less than an hour later, however, the "Flying Dutchwoman" spreadeagled the field in the State 80 metres hurdles championship and won by 12 yards in the brilliant time of 11.4s. Mrs. Blankers-Koenfs time was only two-tenths of a second outside the world's record which she and Miss Maureen Gardner (Britain) jointly established in the Olympic final at Wembley last year. It marks a new Australian record. The Dutchwoman later yester- day created an Australian women's shot put record-34ft lOin. Two Records Stand Marjorie Jackson was credited with the amazing time of 11.8s, which is seven-tenths of a second better than the State record for 100 metres, a distance not com- monly used in Australia. The re...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
It is Bulb Time in Your Garden Bring out your bulbs and look them over for decay and damage. See what your seedsman has in stock of spring-flowering treasure-roots. [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

It is Bulb Time in Your Garden By WARATAH Bring out your bulbs and look them over tor decay and damage. See what your seedsman has in stock of spring-flowering treasure-roots. IT is important to order early your daffodils, hya- cinths, and tulips at least, to ensure a selection of plump, heavy, healthy, bulbs, which can be relied on to give the best flowers. A good strain ol' ranunculus and anemones, too. must be sought in either seedlings or tubers. The seedlings can be ordered for May or June plant- ing; the tubers arc best put oin from March onwards. February is bulb-planting lime, but the "season" con- tinues until April and May. Mostly, the later plantings only give tis an excuse lo add more of these priceless posses- sions-if we can find room for them. OUR {wo most immediate tasks arc to select a suit- able aspect for each of the bulb-companies and to prepare soil for them. Daffodils grow ' well from cold tableland country to Syd- ney's mild coastal climate, which is close to ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GAMBLING Is a Disease [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

GAMBLING Is a Disease Australians »pent at least £305,832,000 gambling, on horses, Hogs, and lotteries last year. The State Treasury estimates that nearly £102,000,000 of this was "invested" in N.S.W. alone. The lottery has taken £16 million since 1932. i SOCIAL scientists sec in the gambling habit, symptoms of a mental disease. They make the astonishing assertion that the "neurotic" gambler wants to lose! When gambling becomes a mental disease in a person, they claim, it follows'two dra- matic patterns. The first was discovered in a survey by an insurance com- pany of 1,000 cases of em- bezzlement in America. Gam- bling proved' by far the major cause of embezzlement. , The average embezzler wai not a villainous fellow with beady eyes and a long waxed moustache. On the contrary, he was a male of normal mien, 36 years old, married, father ol two children, with an ade- quate salary and a respectable position in the community. 'T'HE second pattern is 1 pathological. The leading authori...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW AUSTRALIANS RAISED THE SANTHIA With one exception—the refloating by an anny of American technicians of the giant French liner Normandie — the most spectacular marine salvage feats of recent years have been performed by Australians. [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

HOW AUSTRALIANS RAISED THE SANTHIA By JAMES TAYLOR With one exception-ihe refloating by an anny of American technicians of the giant French liner Normandie - the most spectacular marine salvage feats of recent years have been performed by Australians. THE reputation of such men as Captain J. P. Williams, Carptain ' Herd and divers John and William Johnstone is based on international ac- claim. All four, it will be recalled, were the chief actors in that salvage drama which captured the imagination of the world -the recovery early in the war of £2,379,000 worth of gold ingots from the Niagara lying 438 feet below the tur- bulent surface of the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand. Throughout the war, and afterwards, Williams, Herd and .John Johnstone added to their achievements in circumstances - of danger and difficulty, some- times with separate expeditions, sometimes in the same party ("Bill" Williams having mean- while returned to the R.A.N., which had "loaned" him for the Niagara job). '"P...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SURF STAR IN THREE TITLES [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

SURF STAR IN I THREE TITLES] -« Seventeen-year-old Maroubra surfer Denny Green will con- test three title events in the Australian surf championships at Easter. Maroubra club officials claim that Green is the most versatile surfer in N.S.W. At Maroubra carnival a fort- night ago he gained second place in the surfboard race, ahead of national champion George Bishop. In the national championships, Green will be a member of the club junior boat crew, the junior R. and R. team, and will com- pete in the surfboard champion- ships. _ ..._,_J

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRIGHT FUTURE FOR GIRL [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

BRIGHT FUTURE FOR GIRL By Jim Carlton Marjorie Jackson certainly showed out- standing »printing ability to defeat Fanny Blankers-Koen in the Invitation 100-metres yesterday. This 17-year-old girl is not a perfect stylist as yet, but the fundamentals of her run- ning style are sound Miss Jackson has a bright future if she can correct two faults which were very noticeable in her running yesterday In the first place, she carries her head to one side, and, under pressure, moves it about This is a bad fault, as it upsets bal- ance and relaxation Secondly, she carries her arms too low A higher arm swing, such as that shown to us recently by Lloyd La Beach, would help her greatly I hope that this girl is not "run into the ground " Yesterday she ran in five races That is too much for such a young girl After her defeat in the 100 mcti es, I was inclined to make excuses for Fanny Blankers Koen Her right leg was heavily bandaged and she seemed to be "saving" it somewhat The Dutch champion made...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DESIGNING FOR PERIOD FILMS Top period designer in Hollywood is Walter Plunkett, who says that designing period films gives a fashion designer a chance to "throw away his crystal ball." [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

DESIGNING FOR PERIOD FILMS Top period designer in Hollywood is Walter Plmikelt, who says llial designing period films gives a fashion designer a chance to "throw away his crystal ball." r^ESlGNING costumes for films is an exacting job at any time. Particularly is it so in the case of period films. Apart from the problems which beset every film designer, like studying the movie script scene for scene so that his clothes will properly interpret the characters, mak- ing myriads of advance sketches, and supervising every detail of making and fitting, the period specialist has worries all his own. First of all he must make certain of complete authen- ticity. The slightest error« will bring a deluge of protests from students of the period in question, There arc more of these historical quiz-masters than the average picturc-gocr would suppose. , If the film is in Tcchnicoloi (and it generally is) he must concern himself with the tick- lish problem of colour effects. Often he must make conc...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUDDEN HITCH IN SETTLEMENT OF MINE ROW [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

SUDDEN HITCH IN SETTLEMENT - OF MINE ROW » A hitch has occurred in the plans for, a settle ment of the inter-union dispute at Millfield-Greta Pit on the northern coalfields. The mine has been ¡die since December 7 because of a disagreement between the Miners' Federation and .the Federated Engine Drivers and Firemen's Association over the manning of underground Minches. It was announced at a meeting of'the Coal Industry Tribunal on Friday that it was believed the dispute had been settled and that work would be resumed to- morrow. The secretary of the F.E.D.F.A., Mr. W.' Lane, said last night that if any attempt was made to- pro- duce coal at the mine, his mem- bers employed on the South Mait- land railways would refuse to sup- ply any waggonst to transport it If,the management of the rail- ways took action against the men, the F.E.D.F.A. would withdraw all its members on the South Mait- land field. Most of the coal from the northern field comes from 20 pits in the South Maitland area...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUNDAY "HERALD" CROSSWORD — No. 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

SUNDAY "HERALD" CROSSWORD - No. 3 . ACROSS: I. One who has rows to up- set my help and servant. (12) 8. Demureness of the fashion pen. (7) 9. The most skilful took nourishment returning from the international cricket match. (7) II. Are before a Russian range relating to the land. '5) 12. South Carolina trump on a cat's neck. (6) 14. Dolt. (3) 16. Returns later with dis- honesty and makes a new addition. (9) 19. It might, keep the rain ol the money, before we resi badly in the wind. (3,.6) 20. Conclude. (3) 22. Avoid little Esmond be- fore 100 swing an axe. (6) 23. The bird he follows dur- ing the 10th. (5) 25. Rin-tin-tin "shadows" a sailor in heaven. (7) 27. Fabric isn't a renovated golf-ball. (7). 28. This brilliant thing makes a great impression on the police. (5, 7) DOWN:^ 1. South Australian speed contest for the parents of caterpillars in this Aegean island. (10) 2. Catches on the lower part of thj sport pavilions (11) ? 3. He makes no profit in these disorderly roles. (5) 4. ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

CLASSIC TAILORED SUITS, BLOUSES FROM BRITAIN -. By The David Jones' Roundsman The first tiling the wise woman does when she tackles the business of planning her Autumn or Winter wardrobe is to seek out a suit of fine material tailored to perfection. The second is to buy a distinctive blouse - preferably one that will wash--lo dress up to the excellence of the suit. Taking her cue from David Jones' she will find the answer to the first in the new classic tailored suits from Sumrie of. London, and to the second in exquisite tailored blouses from Pringle of Scotland. ' Pringle blouses, which arc making their first appear- ance in Australia, are made by the manufacturers of the fanions Pringle knitwear, already known and admired by Sydney women. David Jones' buyers singled them out for a special place in the collection of British fashions now on display at the Elizabeth Street store. Despite their soft colours, their intricate design and stitch- ing, Pringle blouses are easily laundered...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Experts Disagree About the Menace of Marihuana, But They Call it The Eighth Plague of Egypt By A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

Experts .Disagree ¿Vhout the Menace of Marihuana, But They Call it The Eighth Plague of Egypt By A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT IS marihuana, regarded by Australian authorities»as so great a menace that its .importation is banned and punishable by gaol sen- tences, in fact less dangerous than alcohol? That is the view of some American medical men. Others disagree sharply,' and insist that marihuana is far more dangerous and demoralising than alcohol. Controversy flared with issue of a report following investi- gation made at the direction of the Mayor of New York. The investigators represented the drug as far less sinistci than the Press and public be- lieved. But the American Medical Association denounced the in- vestigation as "thoroughly un- scientific," and called the re- port a "whitewashing of mari- huana." MARIHUANA is made from the dried leaves of the Indian hemp plant. One reason for its rarity in Australia is that it cannot be made here. Indian hemp grows in Australia, but under ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Piggy's Tail Is NOT Curly From Our Staff Correspondent [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

Piggy's Tail Is NOT Curly From Our Staff Correspondent LONDON, Féb. 5.-Eddie i Rogers, a London music publi- sher, felt so sure he knew all ¡ about pigs that: ¡ . He published a song, "Ev'ry Litlle Piggy's Got a Curly Tail." I »He said as a joke that he I would give ¿£1,000 to anyone who could produce a pig with a straight tail. Next day a Gloucestershire farmer walked up to a newspaper office with a squealing pig under his arm. . ' s It had a straight, tail. The larmer claimed the reward. From all over the country! other farmers wrote about their straight-tailed pigs. Rogéis said: "I thought it was a mi!lion-to-one chance. But I'll pay up for the straightest tail. "All farmers are invited (b bring their pigs to my office next, Wednesday, where I'll have a! panel of veterinary experts to do the judging." A Royal Veterinary College expert said to the "Sunday Herald" that the cold weather and travel fatigue would prob- ably make every pig's tail straight. He added: "Bul if Rogers puts...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SPOTLIGHT ON WORLE AFFAIRS West Remained Firm With Kremlin FROM OUR LONDON OFFICE [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 6 February 1949

[SPOTLIGHT ON WOULD AFFAIRS j I _ » * ? * -t-'?- * West Remained Firm With -Kremlin FROM OUR LONDON OFFICE T AST week-end the men .Li who rule the Commu- nist world indulged in some energetic diplomacy. They tried desperately to regain the initiative from the Western Poweis, who even more energeti- cally had just laid the founda- tions for a Council of Europe and seemed on the Verge of signing the all-out, all-important Atlantic Pact. From the ^Kremlin in answer came a curse, a threat, and a friendly smile, all at,once. First the Soviet Foreign Office violently . denounced' Western Union as "an openly aggressive political line," which must cause the Soviet "to take an-even more energetic stand." Next came a threatening note to Norway demanding to' know her attitude to the Atlantic Pact. Later the Kremlin issued a series of answers from Stalin to questions put to him by ä Hearst correspondent, in which he said he would have no objection to meeting President Truman to co- operate in r...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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