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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

-? A f Thjs Indian Advqcath;. tj l : u - vt - H ;-?5$ ' 4e g ' Afii . . c iilv mir.j SACRED HEART ABBEY. Sketch of Father Robot's Life. Organization of Catholic Missions in the Indian Territory. History of Sacred Ileart Abbey from its Foundation to the Present Time. Description of the Monas tery, its Dependencies and Grounds. 3SIDORE ROBOT was born atTharoiseau, in Burgundy, France, July i8th, 1837. When he was 22 years of age, he entered the Benedictine Order at Pierre-Qui-Vire, Diocese of Sens, France. At the outbreak of the Franco Prussian war of 1870-71, he obtained permission of his su periors to act as chaplain to the French army. After the

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

! -try t-W TV IO Thk Indian Advocate. defeat of Sedan, he crossed the Belgian frontier and return ed to Paris, where he attended with equal devotedness the wounded of both armies, French and German. When the French capital suirendered, he fearlessly crossed the Prussian lines, joined the unfortunate corps of Bourbaki, and bestowed on his soldiers all the helps of charity. In 1873, in company of one brother of the Order, he crossed the Atlantic and went to New Orleans, where they were both warmly welcomed by Archbishop Perche. When in 1875, they came to what was then Indian Terri tory as described and mapped out in our second number of the Indian' Advocate of this year, Father Robot was the first Catholic priest to take up his permanent abode within its boundaries. The Catholics of the Territory had been occasionally visited by priests from neighboring dioceses. Within an area of 69,000 square miles, there was however neither Church, nor school, except a little white-washed chapel th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

h ,- M ' is '"?) ?"& sfTi"i"7CTT''v'TT:STS7" " 'nf"'m " 'J',v- r r a - j. Tub Indian Advocate. i (yws, IW ri The building at the right of the Cross was erected only some months ago, and is the U. S. Postoffice, a Brother of the Monastery being Uncle Sam's Postmaster. The cross itself was placed there in 1885, by the Prior of the Mission, Rev. Father Thomas Duperon, O. S. B. The Novitiate was opened by a decree of the S. C. of the Propaganda, June 24th, 1877. As the community gradually increased, more room was wanted. In 1875 a frame building had taken the place of the log cabin.. In spite of all difficulties, by the 1st of No vember, '79, a frame church and a wing for the religious were added and High Mass was celebrated for the first time on the feast of All Saints. Father Robot now began, at some distance from and to the right of the Monastery, the erection of a building, the prettiest on the grounds, known as St. Mary's Academy, for the training of young girls, both white and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

r 12 This Indian Advocate. hMFt: "' h' 1884, triey were succeeded by the Sisters of Mercy, who have since had charge of the institution. In 1878, a day , school for boys of the neighborhood had also been opened, which developed in what is ' now Sacred Heart College, de- scribed in our last issue. During the administration of Father Robot, churches Were erected at Lehigh, "Savannah, and Krebs, at the latter place a school also was built and given in charge of the Sisters of Mercy. In 1886 Father Robot was obliged to re sign on account of ill health and was succeeded in the Pre fecture Apostolic by Rt. Rev. Ignatius Jean, O. S. B. Ifi '87, Feb. ir, he died at Dallas, Texas, whither he had gone & . Jti Rt. Rev. Ignatius Jean, O. S. B., 2nd Prefect Apostolic of Indian Territory. ' & ,, ,4 fefejsur" JsI'-lju &.L . ! vtfti'A V n." , 4 -iA ' ,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

j. ,. . r-Ty.vrT ri "- ytpj-ij-y" iX'ij ff Thk Indian Advocatk. - 13 ' to .take a well-earned rest, and he was buried at McAlester, wher a chapel was built over his remains, 'the chapel later was removed to Krebs, where the Convent in this place had been destroyed by fire. Preparations are now being made to have his remains conveyed here .and finally laid to rest in the cemetery of the Community, in the rear of the Ab batial Church. Rt. Rev. Ignatius Jean, during his short administra tion, founded several new parishes and schools. He built "Our Lady of Victory," in Purcell, I. T., St. Louis' school among the Osages, and St. Elizabeth's in Purcell, both in charge of the Franciscan Sisters whom he called to the Territory from Philadelphia, Pa. In 1889, Oklahoma was opened to settlement. Every one remembers the stirring address 'which he made in the church of Purcell on the' eve of the great rush, April 21, 1889. He built churches -after that in'Edmorjd, Oklahoma City Guthrie, El. Reno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

fpsjjnjwv 14 Thk Indian Advocatk. M 1877 Rev. Fathers Felix Degrasse and Adalbert Haffner ar-, rived from France, and Rev. Bernard M. Murphy from Savannah, Georgia" .. 1878 Ven. Bro. Joseph Mulhaupt from Missouri. 1879 Ven. Bro. John Larady from New Jersey. "' J 1882 Rev. Fathers Savinian Louismet, Germanus'Guil laume Vincent Jolly, Norbert Hue and Lewis Choron from Ireland. 1883 The Very Rev. Jubilarius Switbert Breiken from Auck land, New Zealand, and Bro. Kmilianus from France. 1884 Rev. Father Thomas Duperon and Hilary Cassal from England. 1886 Rev. Father Ignatius Jean, from France. 1887 Rev. Father Joachim Dougherty from the Indian Ter ritory, 1888 Rev. Fathers Hippolyte Topet, William Ospital, Leo Gariador and Bro. Francis from the Basque country. 1889 Rev. Blias Fink from England, Rev. Fathers Haris mendy, Gratian Ardans, Bros. Theodor, Edward, Casi mir'from the. Basque country. 1890 Rev. Father Isidor Ricklin, from Buckfast Abbey, England. What most prominently strikes the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

4W 'W'T U ' v I'i I; H f "! .!' Thk Indian Advocatk. 15 One of the promises made by Our Divine Lord to Bless ed Margaret Mary Alacoque was: l4I will bless the houses in which the image of my Sacred Heart shall be exposed and honored." The religious of Sacred Heart gratefully ac knowledge that, having confided in that promise of Our Divine Savior, it is to His Sacred Heart they owe their 'al most miraculous escape during 25 years from all dangers of fire, hostility and tornadoes when their buildings are never theless so constantly exposed and so insufficiently provided against them. Praise and homage be to the Sacred Heart .of Jesus and may this striking fact of Divine protection serve to spread and encourage the beautiful devotion so much and so earnestly recommended to the faithful! To be Continued.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

r f $ "i 'i1 v "." j- 7 ("r v wvrTrpw'B;'' ,,r i.y' 16 ' The Indian Advocate. ' ' t-.- ;a v"1 w' fe- PROMINENT CATHOLICS OF OKLAHOMA AND IN- , DIAN TERRITORIES. - ii jpKtfaiiW . jMNtSbKflwiBKSiyrfw , ?r. ?ev. Thcophlle flleerschaert, 1st Bishop of the Oklahoma and Indian Territories. The 1st Bishop of the Oklahoma and Indian Territories was born at Russignier, West Flanders, Belgium, August 24, 1847. In his 12 tli year he began his classical course in the College of Renaix, Belgium. After having completed his philosophical and theological studies at the American College of Louvain, the city of his native country so well-known for its famous Catholic University, he came to this country in 1872. At the time of his appointment, lie was Vicar-General of the Diocese of Natchez, where he was universally revered and loved. lie was consecrated at Natchez, by Mt. Rev. Archbishop Janssens, of New Orleans, La. lie resides at Guthrie, the capital of Oklahoma Ter. When, on the lflth of September...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

"T r : Vr w- wy -w? nwv Thk Indian Advocate, 17 4 If f ' copal city, the people, without distinction of race and creed, gave liim the heartiest welcome. The governor, the chief justice, the mayor, the Catholic and Protestant clergy, were present at the reception tendered him in the Opera House. Never had such a crowd been gathered in Guthrie than on , the day of his arrival. Our Bishop is an able orator, a man of refined character and of the most genial disposition.- During his administration several new churches and schools were erected, namely : St. Catherine's, Guthrie, Alva, Chandler, Anvil, Gushing, Keokuk Falls, Hennessey, Kiel, Enid, Kingfisher, O'Karchee, Korn, Norman, Conception, Perry, Mulhall, Ponca City, Newkirk, Stillwater, Pond Creek, Clyde, Manchester, Ren f ro, Shawnee, Tecumseh, Ilarrah, St. Mary's, St. Gregory's, Yukon, Deer Creek, Union City, in Oklahoma Territory ; Ardmore, Chick ash a, Minco, Hartshorne, South McAlester, Coalgate, (new church, the old one serves...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

yffc ' i tV -yrrt- 18 Thk Indian Advocate. r'Vir'i,''Vt''1''V,'' ff C"W- The boys with a few exceptions, remained at the school during- the Holidays. For many weeks we had looked forward with pleasure to the feast of Christmas The iirst Mass on Christmas morning was said by Rev. A. Dupret, at 5 o'clock, but we remained very comfortable un der the blankets until six o'clock, when the signal was given to rise. A short morning prayer was then said, but 1 think very few, if any, had their thoughts on what they were snying, but wondering if Santa Clans had made his expected trip down the chimney. At (5:30, the larger boys, and also some of the former pupils of the school, received Holy Communion; at 7 o'clock we had breakfast, which was followed at 7:30 by the second Mass, and at 8 o'clock by the High Mass. The Altars were beautifully decorated, and we also had a nice Crib. After x Mass, the boyti assembled in the school-rooms, where each boy received a lace sack full of candy, nuts, coo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

sir-wrT- ' r '-9? TCr Thk Indian Advocate. 19 Ju Iffim Mil lfiS&Y SI 111 1 1 1 LliJ MM DESCRIPTION OF THE MEDAL''(Continued.)v The reverse side of the Medal, as seen in the cut above, shows the image of St. Benedict, holding in his right hand a cross, by the power of which he performed so many mir acles; in his left hand he holds his book of Rules, by which he leads his sons through the cross to the light; at his feet is a raven, which, by command of St. Benedict, was to carry away and hide a poisoned loaf of bread. It is an al lusion to the fact related by Pope St. Gregory the Great, in the life of St. Benedict: uOne day a neighbor of the holy monk who was jealous of his popularity sent him as a token of friendship a cake or loaf of fresh bread. The bread was poisoned and the wicked man thought he could by this means get rid of the Saint." But Benedict who had the gift of prophecy, knew at once that the bread was poisoned, and seeing a bird it was a crow flying near by, he orde...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

r ;vi;tifi"'-i'i y ' " I iniriiii iimfl tiHJMMWahiMqWMttoBBMi 20 The Indian Advocate. -iV ' against the fiery darts of the prince of darkness the prayers inspired by Christ himself the image of St. Benedict, who, by the sign of the Cross conquered the evil spirits and their delusions: these have caused the medal to become a shield to the faithful in all their dangers, and an object of terror to he'll itself. In order that this medal may be a salutary means in all our necessities of soul and body, but especially a guard against all the assaults of the evil spirit, the Church has, for its blessing, ordained especial exercisms and prayers. Innumerable facts will show that the faithful, by the pious use of this cross and the invocation of St. Benedict, receive extraordinary graces from God; spiritual graces, sudden con versions, especially at the hour of death; instantaneous cures; protection against sickness, poison, dangers, and against all the influences of the. wicked spirit. INDULG...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

' T5Tf -'JAt,"J The Indian Advocate. 21 3. Fifty days indulgence for every prayer preparatory for mass, communion, or the office of the Church. 4. An indulgence of seven years for saying the rosary in honor of the Immaculate Conception of the B. V. M., in order to live free from sin, and to die in a state of grace. 5. Once a week an indulgence of twenty years for praying for the extirpation of heresies. 6. An indulgence of one-third of one's incurred penal ties for sin, for the conversion of a sinner either by exhorta tion or by good example. 7. The indulgences which the Holy Father grants to those who, in Rome, receive the solemn pontifical blessing on Holy Thursday and on Raster Sunday, can be gained by those, who on those days, pray for the Holy Father and for the exaltation of the Church. 8. Those who pray for the increase of the order of St. Benedict, share in all the good works of this Order. 9. A plenary indulgence is granted to him who, in the hour of death, after the recept...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

. -"", rjsm 22 .The Indian Advocate. ty in the medical, world, finally advised the father to take his son to a Catholic Priest. I know of such cases he said which were cured by, Catholic Priests You ought to try--' The father was not a Catholic, the physicians neither. Just about that time a Benedictine monk of the monas tery of R. (in England) arrived at the house bound, on some business. The parents knowing he was a priest spoke to him about the case and begged .him most earnestly to use his influence to bring about a cure (they meant to exorcise their son). The priest answered that not belonging to the Diocese of London he could not do so without express per mission .of the Bishop. Remembering, however, that he had a medal of St. Benedict with him he gave it to the par ents requesting them to touch with it every food or drink that the boy would take, and to put it, on him whenever a spell would overtake him. The parents did so and when the Benedictine monk returned, after six mon...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

This Indian Advocatk. 23 Benedictine Order what the members of third orders are in vari ous vrcligiou8 orders. Yet, they are not called Ter.tiaries, because St. Benedict founded in reality only one Order. The Oblates are as old as the Benedictine Order itself, and they honor as their special Mother and Model the Ever-Blessed Virgin Mary who was voluntarily offered to God by her pious pa rents, Saints Joachim and Anna, at the early age of three years. They have as their particular patrons, St.. Francis of Rome, whose feast is celebrated March 9th, and St. Henry, July loth. The obligations of the Oblates are not great,. on the contrary their privileges arc very great. What are now the conditions to be ad mitted as Oblates of the Benedictine Order? Nothing is required but that one lead in the world a truly pious and christian life, that he or she possess a good name and be at least 18 years of age. Whoever possesses these qualities or requirements, may make ap plication to become oblat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

-V 24 Thk Indian AdvocAtk. 3d. Each month make one half hour adoration before the Blessed Sacrament, and, if convenient, assist at the monthly meet ing of the Oblates, where such meeting is organized. 4th. They must yearly renew their offering on the 21st of November, feast of the Presentation of the Bl. Virgin Mary, the patronal and chief .feast of the Oblates. They are also recom mended to sanctify more particularly all the feasts of the Bene dictine Order. N. B. But none of the above named conditions oblige under the penalty of sin. In return of these very small obligations, the Oblates may gain the following indulgences: a Plenary. 1st. On the day of the investment and again of the profession, on the usual conditions; 2d. four times a year, on a day according to each one's choice; 3d, annually on the day of the patronal feast of the Church in which the Oblate has been inscribed; 4th, on the 9th of March, feast of St. Frances of Rome; 5th, on the 15th of July, -St. Henry's day; 6...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

This Indian Advocate. 25 (1. Partial: . The Oblates may gain an indulgence of 7 years and 7 times 40 days; Every time l.they hear or have a mass celebrated for the Deceased Oblates; 2d, they assist at the funeral of an oblate; 3d, they are present at the monthly meeting. The Calendar published in the Indian Advocate is intended to remind the Oblates of-the Benedictine Feasts, and of the days on which they may gain Indulgences, plenary or partial,' as Ob lates or for wearing the Medal and Cross of St. Benedict. N. B. The Oblates can gain all the aforesaid Indulgences and receive the General Absolution on the Sundays following im mediately the mentioned feasts. (Compiled from the Brief of Pope Leo XIII, in date of June J 7th, 1898). TO 111? CONTINUED. X, GLEANINGS OF TWO BENEDICTINE MISSIONARIES THROUGH CALIFORNIA. After repeated invitations of our friends who were anx ious to have us take up missionary labors amongst them for a short time, we started on our trip to the Golden Gate. H...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

26 The Indian Advocatk. ! K V ' 1582, with its bell cast in 1356; the Palace of the Vice-roy (now transformed into the Post-office and a museum) erect- a' t ed in 1598; the narrow and irregular streets, 'the Mexican dwellings in adobe; everything indicates ancient times. Of the modern Institutions we may mention the Cathedral, the Archbishop's residence, the Sanitarium of the Sisters of Charity, the Loretto Academy, the Indian School of Rev. ifc M. Catherine Drexel, and the San Miguel College of the Christian Brothers, all of which are a credit to the Catholic Church, as well as to the city- Very Rev. A. Fourchegu I V. G. who received us fraternally, is one of the old undaunt ed Missionaries of New Mexico, having labored in that rude field for over 30 years. Albuquerque is the most modern and American looking city of the state. From there to the line of Arizona there is nothing to call your attention but a few Indian villages scattered along the railroad. Arizona is a territory of v...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. 27 a Towards noon we enter into ravines, huge mountains raising on either side their rocky and snow white crests to wards Heaven. Our train trudges along in a gradual de scent in a snake like manner. We met a north bound which took the full power and strength of two engines to ascend the high elevation. "Sure enough, we said to one another, this is an ugly and undesirable portion of California. When shall we arrive to the garden of Paradise?" At 2 p. m., we left the mountain ranges and arrived at the city of San Bernardino, and lo! and behold the transfor mation! Beautiful lawns, palm trees, blooming roses, pan sies, carinas, geraniums and a number of other varieties of flowers, delight our eyes and make us feel that we are no more in the desert, but at the gate of a new zone. From San Bernardino to Los Angeles the landscape is most beauti ful . It is an ideal place for raising fruit. The rich and verdant valley is planted with olive, lemon and orange trees as w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

28 ' The Indian Advocate. I i-. r continue the grand and noble work he has undertaken. He is ably assisted by an excellent clergy. It affords us pleas ure to make a special mention of Rev. J. Doyle, Pastor of St. Mary's Church, Boyle Heights, to whom we owe a trib ute of gratitude for his fatherly kindness towards us. Fath er Doyle is the ideal of a good Irish Priest, beloved by all who know him. The Church of Our Lady of Angels, commonly called the uPlaza Church," is the old Mission of the Franciscans. The Pastor, Rev. M. Liebena, is a shrewd little Spaniard, a close student, a Priest of irreproachable character. His assistant, Rev. E. Cote, from the "belle region", of Canada, attends mostly the French element of the parish a Priest well liked "bonus Israelita in quo dolus non est." It is in this church that we preached a Mission and received a great deal of consolation on the part of the French and the Bas ques. From Los Angeles to Santa Barbara it is a pleasant ride of four hours...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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