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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

Fall seeding season In now upon us and it Is time to consider what you are going to need in the seed line. New crops of grass, clover and fall seeds are now in, and our stocks nre exceed ingly fine and we know we can take care of your orders in a satisfactory manner. Those who have bought P. 8. Con. "Diamond Brand" seeds know what they are. To the remaining seed buyers we wish to Nay that our seeds are "the best that grow." In other words, "Diamond Brand" seeds are pure, true and reliable, the only kind you can afford to plant. Before you buy any seeds, write us for prices or any other information you want. Our Complete 1904 Seed Annual gives full descriptions of all grass, farm and field seeds adapt ed to this coast. Copy free. RiSeed s Annual | large, 100 page ;.*•. etc Catalog and .'•: Planters' Guide, :.*• >mely illustrate ..: f most valuable in- ::; ##i formal will be ready .*..: ;.'_•'*' for mailing about Decern- ;'.: ::*.:-: ber 25th. It will be the llnest :■;.:■ '.'''.■• ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

18 The Ripening of Cheese FROM AMERICAN CHKKSKMAKKR. Chemical analysis of many cheese in different stages of curing shows that the curing process consists principally in the change of a complex nitrogen ous compound into a succession of simpler ones. Formerly it was sup posed that paracasein was this com plex compound, but discovery of the paracasein salts gives a better basis of explanation. The formation of par acasein becomes, not the first step in the curing process, but a preliminary step, followed by the building up of the paracasein salt of lactic acid, the most complex body found in cheese. With this complex nitrogen compound the curing process may be properly said to begin; and while we cannot speak as positively on this point as on those which precede our investiga tions indicate that the first breaking down results from the action of pep — a ferment contained in rennet — upon this paracasein salt. The first action of rennet is to co agulate the milk and form paracasein. I...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

MAYFLOWER MINE NOTHING VENTURE, NOTHING HAVE. Fill out carefully, giving correct —name, town, and state. Mayflower Mining & Milling Company, 1327 Western Avenue, Seattle, Wash.: Gentlemen : I herewith subscribe for One Hundred Shares of the Stock of the Mayflower Mining & Milling Company at $1.00 per share. Inclosed I send you postoffice order for $10.00, as the first payment on said subscription, and will remit $10.00 per month until the entire $100.00 is paid up, when I understand you will mail me the stock- and also allow me any dividends that have been credited to the paid-up portion of said block of stock. Name Town State It Is the Wise Man That Knows WHEN. MAYFLOWER MINE THE RANCH MAYFLOWER MINE MAYFLOWER MINE 19

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

20 LEGAL NOTES R. J. BOR YE This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free In these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch. D. J. C, Seattle: There is a resi dent of Seattle who took out citizen ship papers 17 years ago. Claims he is a citizen of the United States, yet receives a pension from the French government. What we wish to know, is he a citizen of the United States or of France, and can he own property here? Kindly answer in The Ranch, to settle an argument. —Answer: In order for an alien to become a citi zen he must live in U. S. five years, and: (1) Must, two years before tak ing out final papers declare his inten tion before some court to become a citizen; (2) Any time after living here five years he may then file his final papers, unless this is done he is not a citizen. Sec. 33, Article 11, of the constitution of Washington, provides that, the ownersh...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

The Angora Goat Industry BY ROUT. E. JOHNS, Secy, Carbon Cattle Company. During President Polk's administra tion the sultan of Turkey requested him to send some one to Turkey who would experiment in the culture of cotton. J. B. Davis, of Columbia, S. C, was appointed, and his work ap peared so highly gratifying to the sul tan that, upon his return to the United States in 1849, the sultan presented the president with nine of the best goats in the country. The goats then were known here as Cashmeres and were so called until they had passed to the ownership of Colonel Richard Peters. From the nature of the hair, everyone thought it was the same ma terial of which the famous Paisley shawls were made. President Polk, upon the receipt of the Angoras, turn ed them over to the secretary of agri culture, who, in time, gave them to Colonel Peters, with the request that he experiment with them and report the results to the department of agri culture. In 1856 the United States Agricul tural soc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

22 doubled or trebled in value by turning Angoras in on it. The average esti mate of clearing Washington brush land is $30 per acre. It takes the An goras no more time to make a perfect job than men, and they "board them selves." Sprouts will spring up be hind men's work, while the Angoras will keep them down until they cease to appear. It must be remembered that one year of "goating" is not suf ficient to have the land ready for the plow. Sprouts will start anew from the roots, therefore the goats should have the run of the wood lot for two years at least. The goats regard these young sprouts as the richest of mor sels, and not one is left to grow. Also, during the time the goats have been on the land, they are enriching it with the richest kind of manure, which is very helpful to the grass first begin ning to grow. The Angora may be pastured with any other animal, for, as has been stated, they do not eat the grass which is necessary to other stock. The ques tion is frequently aske...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

Wanted-Local Stockyards Center C. F. MARTIN, Secretary National Live Stock Association. Washington and Oregon and the en tire northwest territory, possessing everything necessary to produce the finest cattle and sheep in the United States, should have the most prosper ous community of stock-growers of all the states and territories. The prin cipal reason why this is not the con dition at the present time is that there is no market sufficiently large to con sume the stock when ready for slaugh ter. Between the low prices paid at the markets already in operation and the exorbitant freight rates charged by transportation companies it is almost impossible for stock-growers to pro duce the finished product at a profit. If a packing plant were to be estab lished at Seattle sufficiently large to supply the entire demand of the ter ritory now covered by eastern packing houses and the export trade, or the present plants increased to that ca pacity, it would mean millions of dol lars annually...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

24 t Leave the Farm . ... ' Young Man, Young Woman, if Your Ambition Calls You to Other Things * Change and Motion Mean Life; Stagnation Means Death THE ACME BUSINESS COLLEGE teaches you business methods. It teaches you how to keep accounts, whether farmer or professional man. The Acme teaches arithmetic so that you can use it in your business. It teaches you how to compute interest. The Acme teaches the laws of contracts; how to draw notes, drafts, checks and business papers generally. At the Acme you. may learn shorthand and typewriting. You may learn how to systematize your correspondence. You will learn at the Acme how to write a good, plain hand. Samples of students' work will be sent you if you write.. At the Acme you will learn how to write a commonsense business letter. L —— '■ At the Acme you will learn how to spell correctly.. .v We teach other things. Ask about them. We shall be Youth is the time to study. Give the boy. or girl a chance.. glad to have you write to us. " L...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1904

24 I I &%* 1? W-»«M grrmimwßWWMnnm^BffWßWTiiiiNii. mm ■iMmwiirm it"',,™*nmi^^ Young Man, Young Woman, if Your Ambition Calls You to Other Things, Change and Motion Mean Life; Stagnation Means Deathm t Leave the Farm Young Man, Young Woman, if Your Ambition Calls You to Other Things. Change and Motion Mean Life; Stagnation Means Death. THE ACME BUSINESS COLLEGE teaches you business methods. It teaches you how to keep accounts, whether farmer or professional man. The Acme teaches arithmetic so that you can use it in your business. It teaches you how to compute interest. The Acme teaches the laws of contracts; how to draw notes, drafts, checks and business papers generally. At the Acme you may learn shorthand and typewriting. You may learn how to systematize your correspondence. You will learn at the Acme how to write a good, plain hand. Samples of students' work will be sent you if you write. At the Acme you will learn how to write a commonsense business letter. _ : — At the Acme ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

THE RANCH ..................,,.,, VOL. XXI. NO. in. The Agricultural College BY W. G. BEACH, .PULLMAN. Agriculture has always been recog nized as of the utmost importance to human welfare. Yet at no time has so much thought been expended upon it as at present. In recent times there has been a remarkable improve ment in agricultural knowledge and methods. The application of science to the practical affairs of life has worked great changes in many fields, and nowhere is this more noticeable than in agriculture. Young men are finding that the opportunities for a life of progressive activity and ad vancement are not confined to the city, but are opening in greater abundance in the country and on the farm. It was at one time the prevailing idea that science has nothing to do with useful things, but must be studied for its, own sake alone. Industry, it was thought, too, Is not subject to improvement, but must move in the grooves worn for it by long estab lished custom. As scientific knowl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

THE RANCH WiM VOL. XXI. NO. 19. The Agricultural College BY W. G. BEACH, PULLMAN. Agriculture has always been recog nized as of the utmost importance to human welfare. Yet at no time has so much thought been expended upon it as at present. In recent times there has been a remarkable improve ment in agricultural knowledge and methods. The application of science to the practical affairs of life has worked great changes in many fields, and nowhere is this more noticeable than in agriculture. Young men are finding that the opportunities for a life of progressive activity and ad vancement are not confined to the city, but are opening in greater abundance in the country and on the farm. It was at one time the prevailing idea that science has nothing to do with useful things, but must be studied for its, own sake alone. Industry, it was thought, too, is not subject to improvement, but must move in the grooves worn for it by long estab lished custom. As scientific knowl edge grew, however, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

2 Eagineer Newell was in Errar. Editor The Ranch: According to the report recently appearing in The Ranch, F. H. Newell, chief engineer of the reclamation bureau of the United States, in addressing a meeting of the Spokane chamber of commerce, said: "The critical point in this Palouse project, as it is known, is the Wash tucna reservoir. The bottom of it is used by the O. R. & N. for its branch from Kahlotus to Connell. The old roadbed there lay idle for several years and only this year did the railroad re vive it, after we had gone thoroughly over the ground with the company and it knew how vital that coulee is to our project. The engineers of the O. R. & N. decided that a track could be laid along the north hills of the cou lee, and I supposed that was what the company would do." As the result of the remarks made by Mr. Newell a committee was ap pointed to take up the matter with the O. R. & N. Co., and, judging from the published statement of one of the members of thi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

THE RANCH Office: 38 Downs Building. MILLER FREEMAN Editor and Proprietor, P. L. AXLING Assistant Editor Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month. Subscription, in advance, one year. 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay SI per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from th« subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Falling to rec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

I HORTICULTURAL NOTES Guaranteed Nursery Stock. The nurseryman who agrees to re place all trees and shrubs that do not live up to a certain time after plant' ing is doing himself an injury and is encouraging carelessness and fraud among many of his patrons. A doctor who advertises a cure guaranteed is usually considered a quack, and is held under suspicion. A first-class physi cian will do all he possibly can for his patients; tell under what conditions recovery may be expected, explain cir cumstances which may necessitate change of medicine; tell of complica tions which may arise; and will end with directions for the care of the pa tient. No one doubts his knowledge, his skill is recognized, his wide ex perience is known, and every one is on the whole satisfied in seeking his advice. The same can be applied to nurserymen; those who have the repu tation for carelessness, for having knowledge and experience, and for having their patrons' interests at heart should have the same confid...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

from the center of population and the consequent high cost of transportation, necessitates carload lots and the use of much ready capital, which only the wholesale merchants can afford. Time, of course, will relieve the producer of this burden." The writers in daily papers who think the toad has no standing in this country as it has in Europe, are much mistaken. All gardeners know their value in the way of devouring insects and many florists keep them in their green houses, where they are lively all winter. Edward M. Ehrhorn, of Mountain View, California, succeeds Alexander Craw as deputy commissioner of hor ticulture for California. Mr. Craw has gone to the Hawaiian Islands to take charge of the work of fighting the insect pests there. According to the Hood River Gla cier, the strawberry growers of White Salmon, Wash., are talking of organiz ing a union. Heretofore their berries have been handled by Hood River or ganizations. The berries ripen soon er on the Washington side of the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

6 THE DAIRY Dairying in Whatcom County. In the last number of The Ranch there appeared a contributed article on the farms of Whatcom county and what they produce, from the pen o R. L. Kline, secretary of the Whatcom county fair association. Mention was made therein of the progress bein? made in the dairy industry. A more extended mention of this subject wil be given here, together with illust*" tions of scenes in the county, for which The Ranch is indebted to the Pacific Pilot, of Lynden. Owing to lack of space this matter could not appear in our last number. In all good dairying countries or sections it has been demonstrated by farmers who have engaged in the dairy industry on a small scale that the busi ness will make good returns if prop erly handled. By the term "properly handled" are meant the right care and feed of the cows, strict cleanliness o J cows, stables and every utensil thai has anything to do with the business, rapid cooling of the milk as soon as drawn from the cow,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

stands the manufacturers have no ap peal from the decision of the commis sioner of internal revenue to the courts. The desire of the oleomarga rine interests is to take from the com missioner this right and lodge it in the court, where every disupte must be submitted to a jury. This would bring about a chaotic state of things, be cause juries in cities where such cases arise are usually prejudiced against the interests of farmers and very likely to give the oleomargarine maker the benefit of every doubt. Un der such a condition the effectiveness of the law would be seriously im paired. When the dairymen of the country, three and four years ago, were ask ing for the enactment of the oleo margarine law, the people interested in the manufacture of the article told congress that the move was an effort on the part of dairymen to stifle com petition, and that as soon as the bill was passed the price of butter would advance to 40 and 50 cents. Advo cates of the measure in behalf of the dai...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, Ellensburg, Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Cooking As a Science. The farmers of the west are rapidly advancing along their lines. They have machinery suited to their vari ous needs and each year shows a marked improvement in their meth ods of farming. The farmer has learned how to care for his stock so it will yield him the greatest income. He pays special attention to the stabling and feeding of his herds, and can tell you what kinds of feed are the most profitable for each season of the year. He has also by careful experiments learned to rotate his crops, so that he may harvest an abundant crop each year and still keep his land in good condition. But a proportional advancement has not been made in the household, and it is no easy matter to determine where to place the blame. The farmerfs attentio...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

{^^■^^^^^"■■(■■■■a^***, **. ]ii ' ' ' I ! ' SSj-nflrf BThe Emerson Piano Co. began the manufacture of pianos in 1849 —55 years of successful business record goes to the credit of the great Emerson fac- These beautiful Pianos are sold all over this coun try by the strongest dealers in every section. Even John Wanamaker, the prince of merchants, has ar ranged to handle the Emerson Piano in his mam moth New York and Philadelphia stores. We have in our warerooms in Seattle all the styles manufac tured by the above company, which we are selling on our easy payment plan. Drop us a postal asking for further information and for an explanation of our easy payment contract. Besides the Emerson Pianos, we have the famous Steinway & Sons, A. B. Chase, Starr, Richmond, I Gramer, Heller & Co.. Woodbury, Thayer and others, -*1 and we show on our floors 100 instruments, surely a splendid array to select from. To a customer in the country who would like to come to our store to make a selecti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1904

10 POULTRY ——— H. L. BLANCHARD ——— Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. Profit in Raising the Capon. It is surprising, in view of the de cidedly great advantages of castrat ing males, that there is not a great deal more of it done; and it seems altogether probable that if poultry growers knew how great the advant ages are and how simple and easily the operation is performed, there would be comparativelyy few cockrels allowed to grow beyond broiler size uncastrated —excepting the few needed for breeding purposes, says the Re liable Poultry Journal. The uncastrated male bird grows up to be coarse, "staggy," and his coarse flavored, hard, stringy meat is worth less than half as much per pound as it would be if the tender, delicate flavored chicken condition had been continued by the birds being cas trated. There is the greatest ga...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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