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Elephind.com contains 1,440 items from Inscape, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LISTENING TO GOD'S WORD [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

LISTENING TO GOD'S WORD If God is love, he cannot cease to love you with anything less than an everlasting, perfect love. This means that he is loving you precisely at this moment, in this human encounter with this person, in this moment of sickness, confusion, desire for success, in this situation of humiliation and seeming failure, in that joy and in this cross. Asceticism for modem Christians must primarily consist in a gentle spirit that listens attentively to God’s Spirit revealing that God is now at this moment in-breaking with his infinite love. You practice asceticism and inner discipline when you see that this duty, this action, this passive acceptance of what is being done and cannot be undone, is a part of God’s presence. This "place” is holy because God is about to manifest his love and goodness to you in this placemoment. A housewife is being ascetical when she sees that she is praising God more at this moment by preparing for her hungry family than by going off to a Bi...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SOME PRINCIPLES [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

SOME PRINCIPLES I would like to present to you some principles that may be helpful for you as you seek to bring discipline into your spiritual life: 1. The first principle is that any and all ascetical practices must always be considered as means to attain the end of full perfection in the spiritual life. The value of any practice depends on interior motivation, along with therapeutic correctives which offset the influences of sin in all its self-centeredness, to aid one's growth in the spiritual life and in the positive development of Christ-like virtues. 2. The whole person must be the subject of continual discipline. We must see individual acts of self-control as roles played within the whole context of one's spiritual life. You cannot focus your attention and curb only your bodily appetites while giving free rein to your inner imagination. You are a whole person, made up of body, soul, and spirit relationships. 3. There must be a hierarchy in your ascetical practices. Certain ar...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AREAS OF DISCIPLINE [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

AREAS OF DISCIPLINE If you are to grow in deeper prayer and oneness with God, striving at every moment to seek to please him, you must concretely zero in upon the various areas that make up your life. 1. Discipline of the body and exterior senses: There are many hindrances to success in prayer, such as preoccupation with work, bad health, sluggishness and sleepiness in the morning, etc. These eventually are overcome and do not bar real success. But lack of consistent discipline in the control of the body and the exterior senses will always bring about a state of dissipation in self-surrendering prayer. Here we might examine our indulgence in the matter of food, drink, sleep, sex, smoking. Does fasting have any place in your life? The indiscriminate watching of TV without any control can destroy any desire to pray. Do you watch TV excessively? What type of program do you watch? How many hours a day do you give to TV? 2. Discipline of the inner senses: You are not to ignore or allow t...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PARADOX OF TRUE LIFE [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

PARADOX OF TRUE LIFE In summary, Jesus preached a doctrine that contained many paradoxes. The terrible carrying of his cross to Calvary, his mounting it to preach with his dying breath the saving doctrine of death to self, only to bear fruit in the resurrection, is a summary of what every Christian's life should be. In our spiritual life, there must be a constant dying to those elements that prevent our full growth, so that God may live completely in us. Is there any other way than the cross of self-denial, going against your false self, so that you also may enter into the glory and risen life of Jesus Christ? How beautifully the poet Francis Thompson captures this universal law that birth and death, new life and discipline are inseparable. He writes in his Ode to the Setting Sun : For there is nothing lives, but something dies. And there is nothing dies, but something lives. Till skies be fugitives, Till time, the hidden root of change, updries, Are Birth and Death inseparable on e...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 10 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993
Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 10 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

AUDIO TAPES BY FR. MALONEY To supplement this important topic of discipline as an aid to deeper prayer, Fr. Maloney has prepared some audio tapes that you may find a great help for your growth in deeper contemplation. You may order these tapes, $4 per tape, from June Culver: 850 Coastline Dr.; Seal Beach, CA 90740. This includes the cost of mailing. 1. GO 13: Fasting & Contemplation 2. G 026: Prayer as Asceticism; part one 3. G 027: Prayer as Asceticism; part two 4. G 036: Death as Growth 5. G 043: On Asceticism 6. G 005: How to Listen to God 7. G 165: Inventory, Confession & Amendment 8. G 151: Prayer as Purifying Suffering 9. G 031: Go into the Desert 10. G 105: Asceticism & Deeper Prayer Order from June Culver: 850 Coastline Dr.; Seal Beach, CA. 90740. 11 * t-1-11* +• +• 11-11 *t*+•** +• +• * t-1 +• * f-1 f * FR. MALONEY'S SCHEDULE 1. Jan. 8: Conference at United Methodist Church in Westwood, CA on the Role of Angels and Saints in Building the ...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
INSCAPE [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 January 1993

INSCAPE Cd?ten?platlYe Ministries 850 CoattllQC fir. Seal Bead;, CSL 90710 nmmm\ ok. iLiranioi PAID SUm BEMN. 61 mmm.i

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

INSCAPE

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ: May the mercies of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God the Father, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be always with you! f This month of February leads us into the liturgical season of Lent. Some of us do not welcome Lent. We remember all too well the stress in former times placed on our "giving up" things and concentrating on sins of the past. Some Christians welcome this penitential period of the liturgical year which gives us an opportunity to prepare for Easter and rise to greater union with Christ as we intensify our spirit of repentance and sorrow for our sinfulness and develop a burning desire to be more converted to God-Trinity as the true and absolute Center of our lives. I pray that during this period of Lent, 1993, you will come to understand that one cannot enter into deeper contemplative union with Jesus Christ without a constant response to the Holy Spirit's call to true repentance. It is the basis for your continued conversio...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DEEPER PRAYER AND TRUE REPENTANCE [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

DEEPER PRAYER AND TRUE REPENTANCE When I was in the second grade and all of seven years old, I made my first confession. Unlike most Catholics, I rather liked going to confession. For a year or so I went regularly each Saturday. My mother would ask me each Saturday what I was telling the priest. ’’That's between me and God,” I would reply as I guarded my sacred "sins.” To this day I wonder why I so enjoyed going to confession when most other Catholics I knew hated the ordeal! I guess I enjoyed that "clean” feeling that came over me when I left the confessional box and said my three Hail Marys. God had forgiven me my sins and I was at peace with God and the entire world. I am sure that I entertained a very primitive, childlike understanding of sin and sinfulness. But, however I understood the concept of sin and guilt, one thing was certain from my early childhood until now: Jesus Christ had given his Church the power to proclaim God's healing and forgiving mercy to all who came and h...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
GENERAL DISSATISFACTION [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

GENERAL DISSATISFACTION Would you deny that the sacrament of Reconciliation is less regularly frequented now than before Vatican 11. People in our parishes in general, the clergy and religious, and especially the youth, do not go to confession regularly. Unfortunately, this sudden turning away from frequent confession cannot be attributed to the fact that Catholics are becoming holier and are sinning much less than they did a few decades ago! I do not intend to outline all the reasons for this lack of frequenting the sacrament of Reconciliation among Catholics and Orthodox today. I wish to develop the theme of repentance as a necessary element in developing true, contemplative prayer. A spirit of continued conversion is necessary in a relationship between ourselves and God if we are to make God-Trinity the Center of our lives. Without authentic repentance we will never progress deeper into contemplative union with God.

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A NEW CLASS OF PENITENTS [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

A NEW CLASS OF PENITENTS As I preach retreats and missions in various parishes around the country, I find a small segment of penitents living in each parish I visit. This is demonstrated equally in the way they receive the sacrament of Reconciliation and the depth of their spirit in contemplative prayer. Re-awakened are their personal relationships with Jesus Christ and with their neighbor. Perhaps through Cursillo, Marriage Encounter, the charismatic renewal, adult education programs, ’’Renew,” or other parish renewal programs, they have moved into a deeper search within themselves. Through prayer that moves to a lively faith-filled encounter with Jesus Christ and the indwelling Trinity, they are discovering their true, beautiful, unique personhood in the Trinity’s personalized love for them. They are striving to live more intimately in loving service to others in their family, parish, at work, and in their society. They have moved away from the static legalism of the ten commandme...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LOSS OF THE SENSE OF SIN [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

LOSS OF THE SENSE OF SIN Many of us Christians have been sucked into the quick-sand of our modem secularistic society with its exaltation of the rugged individual over the building of loving communities through self-sacrificing service for others. In this condition, we will continue to reject the call to respond to God's acceptance of us in our sinfulness and we will fail, therefore, to be transformed from selfcenteredness to Christ-centered, authentic Christians. In our society today the very word, "sin,” has disappeared from the everyday experience of the average modem person, including children, who seem to have difficulty in understanding the difference between doing good or doing wrong. We speak about dysfunctionalism, either inherited from our parents' genes or caused by their failure to bring us up with loving care. We hear about undergoing a crisis of identity, but rarely does anyone take responsibility for the sinfulness and brokenness in his or her life. Those Christians w...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
HUMAN SINFULNESS [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

HUMAN SINFULNESS Dr. Karl Menninger, in his classic, Whatever Become of Sin?, quotes Webster’s dictionary definition of sin and adds his own: Sin is transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine will; moral failure. Sin is failure to realize in conduct and character the moral ideal, at least as fully as possible under existing circumstances; failure to do as one ought towards one’s fellow man (Webster)...The wrongness of the sinful act lies not merely in its nonconformity, its departure from the accepted, appropriate way of behavior but in an implicitly aggressive quality--a ruthlessness, a hurting, a breaking away from God and from the rest of humanity, a partial alienation, or act of rebellion. Human sinfulness is an experience of the greatest reality that far exceeds any mere rational definition. The true nature of sin consists in a human person’s refusal to love God and neighbor unselfishly. It is slavery to self-centeredness into which condition we are bom. It is ...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ORIGINAL SIN [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

ORIGINAL SIN God creates us human beings to share intimately in friendship with him by making us according to his own image and likeness (Gn. 1 & 2). But the biblical story of Adam and Eve's fall shows us that some terrible, original calamity wrenched and destroyed the harmony in love that we human beings were called to bring about by our free cooperation with God's grace, his Trinitarian, uncreated energies of love that permeate all of us and in which all live and move and have our being (Ac. 17:28). Cardinal John Henry Newman wrote of the certainty of original sin and its transmission to all created, earthly beings in a world that is groaning together in travail: If there be a God, since there is a God, the human race is implicated in some terrible aboriginal calamity. It is out of joint with the purposes of its Creator. This is a fact, a fact as true as the fact of its existence; and thus the doctrine of what is theologically called original sin becomes to me almost a...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE DYNAMICS OF SIN [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

THE DYNAMICS OF SIN The dynamics of the scriptural view of original sin and our own personal sins link our sinful rejection of God's infinite and eternal plan with God’s infinite mercy in giving us a Messiah, a Redeemer, in his own Son, the Word of God enfleshed in Jesus Christ. Sin has to do with the abominable abuse of our free will to turn away from God's loving plan (Eph. 1:4 ff.). Yet it is intermeshed with God's infinite mercy and forgiving love, as St. Paul points out in Ephesians 2:1-6.

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SIN AND REPENTANCE [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

SIN AND REPENTANCE If sin comes through the abuse of our free will to turn away from loving God and neighbor, so we see that repentance comes to us through the proper exercise of our free will to cooperate with God's infinite merciful love. Sin locks us into a prison of defilement. Repentance opens us up to freedom through purification and forgiveness. Sin brings self-inflicted punishment by going against our basic God-given human nature. Repentance, through claiming humbly our personal guilt for wilfully turning away from God and by confession to God and community, erases such punishment. Sin damages the innermost part of our psyche where God's Shekhinah dwells. Repentance heals us and returns us to be "participators of God’s very own nature" (2 Pt. 1:4). Sin separates and alienates us from the triune divine-life within us. Repentance brings us out of the illusion of God's absence to make God even more present to us through humble conversion. Sin brings us false pleasures and illus...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
WHAT IS REPENTANCE? [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

WHAT IS REPENTANCE? Repentance as a noun and to repent as a verb come from the Latin verb, paenitere , which means to be sorry, to grieve, to regret. Asa religious term it denotes in general a person's attitude, will, and behavior, sometimes accompanied by feelings of sorrow and regret for past transgressions and perhaps accompanied by some form of restitution. It is a phenomenon found in most of the ancient religious traditions. Repentance embraces usually all the restorative religious rituals or means, including confession of sins publicly or to an assigned religious representative, restitution, purification, and expiatory sacrifices that would lead one from impurity to purity, from sin to salvation, from community of the lost to that of the saved. The primary end of repentance and all its ritual elements is to objectify and to rectify the cause of any breached relationship between a community or a member of the same and God.

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
JUDAISM [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

JUDAISM In Judaism, the religion of Jesus and his first disciples, we can find a gradual development away from rituals, which were adopted from ancient religions the Israelites encountered around them, to a more conscious and personalized sense of guilt as well as a conversion by which they would return to the covenantal love of God. In Hebrew two words are used to describe the richness of the Jewish concept of repentance, precursor to that practiced by the early Christians. Shav means to turn back. Repentance is a turning back to God, as Joel exhorts the Jews around 400 BC: "Come back to me with all your heart, fasting, weeping, mourning. Let your hearts be broken, not your garments tom, turn to Yahweh, your God, again, for he is all tenderness and compassion, slow to anger, rich in graciousness, and ready to relent (Jl. 2:12-13). The broader word for repentance in Hebrew usage is teshuvah (in Greek, metanoia). The concept of teshuvah is very rich and deserves our prayerful conside...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLAIMING ONE'S SINFULNESS [Newspaper Article] — Inscape — 1 February 1993

CLAIMING ONE'S SINFULNESS In prayers from the great Jewish Day of Atonement that were recited in the lifetime of Christ and still are recited in all Jewish synagogues throughout the world we find three essential elements of repentance. 1. The individual, within the bonds of the Jewish community, seeks a communal and individual acquittal from sin through atonement. 2. Both the individual penitent and the mourning community seek together a catharsis or a purification from the stains of sin. 3. The test of receiving true repentance and hence acquittal from sins must be found in a constant process of conversion that demands a turning from sin and all paths leading to sin. The most basic part of the atonement from all sins on Yom Kippur begins with each individual person as well as the entire community gathered together in remorse to acknowledge their sins. There can be neither true repentance nor conversion unless there be acknowledgment of sins committed. King David acknowledged his si...

Publication Title: Inscape
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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