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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

March 1992 Young Farmers polish skills, tour Morven and U.Va. (Continued from Page 1) during his presentation called '' Paradigms.'' A paradigm is a pattern or model, or any set of rules A film Slade showed, narrated by nationally-known public speaker Joel Barker, illustrated the danger of making decisions based on one perspective. For instance, the quartz watch was invented in Switzerland, but manufacturers there had a mindset for traditional watches. Seiko of Japan saw the quartz watch at the World's Fair, and decided to make them. "If we're not careful, our past success will block new success," Barker said. Barker conceived the bicycle Easy Seat which looks like two leather hotdog buns. Without having any rule in mind of how a bike seat should look, he concentrated on comfort. Bike manufacturers didn't think of it because they hold to the saddle-shape concept that has dominated the market for years, he said. After the film, each table of workshop participants had to build a Tinke...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

12 It's not too early to think about irrigation methods The greatest interest in automated irrigation methods for home gardens usually occurs in July, when the novelty of moving sprinklers and hoses about the garden has worn off and the impossibility of watering and harvesting at the same time has made itself clear. But now, at planting time, is the time to learn about the various irrigation options and install your system while you plan and plant the garden. I have found trickle irrigation to be a great benefit in my garden. With a trickle system, small amounts of water are frequently applied, replacing the water in the soil as it is used by plants. Two systems are commonly employed in home gardens, either a network of tubing and water emitters placed at the bases of plants (often referred to as drip irrigation) or porous hoses which ooze water along their entire length (also called leaky or soaker hose). There are a number of advantages to trickle irrigation over the traditional w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

March 1992 Redisricting is a new challenge for rural people (Continued from Page 1) As for agriculture, Anderson said, "Redisricting will not help us at all." While Anderson has sold his tobacco allotment and cattle, he lets people know farming is still in his bl<x)d. He keeps much of his 360 acres of farmland in pines, grasses and hay. "Our legislators are going to have a time representing agriculture the way it should be." In 1958, when Anderson began serving in the House of Delegates, rural areas controlled two-thirds of the General Assembly; now they make up only onethird. according to political analyst Larry Sabato. Speaking to the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation in December, the University of Virginia professor also noted 26 of the 36 new faces in the General Assembly live in urban or suburban areas. Anderson echoes Sabato's recommendation that coalitions be built between rural and urban areas. And Democrats will have to work with Republicans, "which I never had any...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

14 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 15) PROMTIME HEADQUARTERS—free prom gown & tuxedo rental. Call/visit Bridal and Formal, Chester 796-7928! MAGNETIC SIGNS made to order, quality work, reasonable rates; quotes given. CaH Madison Signs 703-923-4477. ARE YOU SPENDING your fertilizer dollars wisely? David Kindig-Ag Consulting Service. Soil consulting, crop scouting. Analytical services by Brookside Farms Laboratories Assoc., Inc. Call collect 703-775-0601 day or evening. UNLIMITED INCOME—High comm. potential saving homeowners big $$. Great PT./FT. for Bankers, R.E. Agents, Accountants and Retirees for suppl. income. New financial service—no exp. necessary. Dare to call today: 1-800-365-7550, ext. 3112 RUNNING LOW ON MONEY or just plain bored? I need people ready to work in their homes. Call 703-885-3356. NEED A JOB? Send resume or job history to— Anderson, POB 792, Midlothian, VA. 23113. GOVERNMENT JOBS. $16,040-$59,230/yr. Now hiring. Call 805-962-8000, ext. R-2012...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

March 1992 REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS. 9—rent or sell. Graperidge Farm, Box 115, Goochland, VA. 23063. REAL GOOD YOUNG purebred Angus bull. Easy calving, high performance breeding. $550. 804-823-4900. WANTED—farm or pasture for beef cattle. Spotsylvania or Orange County. 703-399-1208. WANTED—farm or pasture for beef cattle. Culpeper or Madision County. 703-399-1208. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN BULLS. Service age. Call 703-825-0590. FOR SALE—Hounshell's black, Simmentals black, Polled Simmentals bulls, cows. Hay square bales alfalfa. 703-686-4055. 2 EXCELLENT PUREBRED ANGUS HEIFERS. Performance breeding. Brood cow material. $550 each. 804-823-4900. BEEFMASTER, fertility, tested registered BBU beefmaster service age bulls. Mrs. Vivian Evans. 703-682-4457. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD breeding age bulls. A.I. & natural sires. 703-382-2050. 40 ANGUS COWS, 1100 lbs, 7 yrs., 25 calves (11 registered). 804-352-5550. ANGUS BULLS, ages 1 to 2 yrs., $500 to $800. Amelia, VA. 804-230-232...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1992

Vol. 51, No. 2 THE VCHCE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS March 1992 Slow down for a hoedown Melissa Motley, 6, and Adam Motley, 10, of Pittsylvania County donned their Western duds for a hoedown during the Virginia \\\ Farm Bureau Federation Young Fanner Leadership Conference Jan. 24-26 at Charlottesviße. Participants got to lasso some f PpP leadership skis in workshops, visit Morven Farms and U.Va., y hear how to "romance the home" and recognize committee i 4 | ' accompishments. See stories on Pages 1 and 4, along with JHk I ; ' more scenes from the weekend on Page 4. (Photo by Kattiy B. Springston) — ' ■

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

Vol. 51, No. 3 Putting People First chairman urges Women's help against animal rights By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—'AnimaI rights is a grassroots movement, and the only way to counter it is through grassr<x)ts efforts," said Kathleen Marquardt, founder of the group Putting People First. Ms. Marquardt, who manages an eight-person animal use advocacy staff in Washington, was the breakfast speaker for county Women's Committee chairmen March 2 at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Statewide Women's Conference. Putting People First started two years ago when Ms. Marquardt's daughter's biology class was taught for two days by a person in the People for Ethical Treatment of Animals group. The daughter said she was told her mother is a murderer. Ms. Marquardt hunts She also supports the production of meat, milk and eggs, zoos, medical research using animals, fishing, riding horses, owning pets and wearing leather and furs. The typical animal rights lea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

2 Lobbying staved off higher health insurance costs The average cost for a hospital stay in Virginia is more than $500 a day. Last year Americans spent almost $700 billion on health care, or nearly an eighth of our gross national product. Since 1980, family incomes have grown by 88 percent, while health care costs soared 147 percent. About 800,000 Virginians and 35 million Americans carry no health insurance primarily because it is unaffordable. Meanwhile, medical inflation is spiraling at an 18-percent annual clip. And, as the weatherman might assert during a July heat wave, "there is no relief in sight." There is growing pressure on our lawmakers to pass legislation each year which would ultimately send the alarming rates even higher. Fortunately, Farm Bureau's lobbying efforts, along with efforts from other groups, helped stave off the onslaught during the 1992 Virginia General Assembly which adjourned March 7. General Assembly efforts concluded (Continued from Page 1) school sys...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

April 1992 APRIL: National Lawn Care Month. Contact the Professional Lawn Care Association of America at 404-977-5222, or your local Extension office. April 12-13: Mid-Atlantic saddlebred, hackney, roadster and tack sale, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington. Contact 703-463-3777. April 13-15: Virginia Water Resources Conference, Hyatt-Richmond Hotel. Contact 703-231-5624. April 14-16: Virginia Cattle Industry Board spring meeting, Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Holiday Inn Koger Center, Richmond. Contact 703-992-1009. April 14-15: Virginia Poultry Health and Management Seminar, Roanoke. Contact Mike Hulet, Virginia Tech, 703-231-9181. April 14: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast meeting, Marriott Hotel, Richmond. 8 a.m., $7 charge. Contact Donna Pugh, 804-746-12 52. April 17: Virginia Cooperative Extension Service marketing update, 10:30 a.m. to noon, satellite downlink program. Galaxy 2, channel 24. Review of planting intentions ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

4 Spice up your life to bring your blood pressure down May is National High Blood Pressure Month. It's estimated that about 60 million Americans have some degree of high blood pressure. Almost half of the Virginia Farm Bureau members screened at the December 1991 Annual Convention in Richmond had high blood pressu re readings (defined as readings of 140/90 or higher). High sodium intake is one of several factors believed to contribute to high blood pressure. We should begin by explaining that everyone has blood pressure. It is the force of blood against the walls of the arteries. This force is created by the heart as it pumps blood throughout the body. When we eat salty foods, our blood volume begins to expand. (That's why for many people, their feet or hands swell after eating an Oriental meal or a few slices of pizza). NewWellness for Farm Bureau u To keep the swelling down, the brain releases a substance to help the kidneys excrete the excess salt. That's the good news. The bad n...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

April 1992 Teamwork is key to winning season The Farm Bureau meeting schedule is finally winding down and the spring season is upon us. Since our annual meeting in December, Maxine and I have represented the Viiginia Farm Bureau \bung Farmers at three state board meetings, the American Farm Bureau Federation's 73rd annual meeting at Kansas City, Mo., the Young Farmer and Rancher Leadership Conference at Philadelphia, our own state leadership conference at Charlottesville, the Presidents Conference at Roanoke, two state Young Farmer Committee meetings, and the Statewide Women's Conference at Richmond. Our schedule has certainly been hectic, but we believe that the profession of agriculture depends on strong, motivated leaders. We are fortunate to have very supportive families who pick up our work load and do a great deal of babysitting while we put in the many volunteer hours involved in serving as your state Young Farmer chairmen. Even though the Farm Bureau meeting calendar is clea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

6 Statewide Women's Conference attended by record 287 W^ r ' ' '■ v - • < 1 ' X/' | IPJP®^^™"^' Katherine Clements, center, chairman of the Rockbridge County Women's Committee, receives the silver chairman's award platter from State Women's Chairman Helen Neese and VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. mmmmmm. :% * >>■ Mary Frith of Pittsylvania County displays a basket she won in a Lucky Leader drawing. The basket held country products and a rag doll made and donated by the Scott County Women's Committee. Women's Committees awarded for accomplishments By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Between farm tours, political rallies, civic work, meetings and farmlife the Prince William/Fairfax Farm Bureau Women's Committee found time to record its activities in a thick, colorful scrapbook. Just when co-chairmen Margaret Covington and Grace Shepherd thought they could sit and rest a spell at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Statewide Women'...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

April 1992 rfl| ? Mb ■ Wool sweepstakes winner Karen McComb, right, gives Bea EHett of Nottoway County a closer look at her outfit. Speaker puts people before animals (Continued from Page 1) The report, called "Current Issues in Food Production: A Perspective on Beef as a Component in Diets in America," is available from the National Cattlemen's Association, at 5420 S. Quebec St., Englewood, Co. 80155. Ms. Marquardt urged the women to get copies of this report as ammunition against animal rights activists and to stand up for people's rights to use animals. An audience member asked, "How can John Robbins justify making money off of the dairy industry?" David Foreman of Earth First claims that "radical environmentalists see AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) not as a problem, but a solution," read Ms. Marquardt. Understanding animal rights activists is hard, she said. "If they want to believe they are equal to rats and cockroaches, and wear plastic shoes and eat tofu, what do ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

8 For Earth Day, remember recycling starts at home 0 SHARING SECRETS with SHIRLEY million tons of trash each year in trash cans, roadside ditches and other places. The average American family of four can accumulate as much as 50 pounds of trash weekly. Think about the trash that you take to the Dumpster or that is picked up at your curb. Where does all this trash go? Where is it accumulated? Eighty percent goes to landfills and this is why landfills are filling up and people are resisting the requirements to dig additional ones. This is when the nimby (not in my back yard) principle kicks into action. Who wants a landfill in their back yard? And yet, landfills are an absolute must when you look at how much trash we are all making and discarding weekly. Ten percent of trash is incinerated or burned and 10 percent is recycled. We can make a real difference with recycling. If we analyze what we throw away, (and there are people who make analyzing a profession) we would find that 41 per...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

April 1992 Off-color vegetables are no joke but are fun and tasty As flower enthusiasts strive for white marigolds and blue roses, vegetable gardeners also look for novel colors in their crops. Blue potatoes, yellow beets and white tomatoes are among the many unusual colored vegetables being advertised in seed catalogs. The popular summer squash zucchini is a good example of a vegetable that has changed color. Traditionally, we think of this squash as having a dark green rind. But it can be found with light green, yellow or golden skin. Several years ago I grew the All America Selection (AAS) called Gold Rush. The ripening fruits were impossible to miss on the plants so I never ended up with an>' zucchinis too big to use. The goldencolored zucchini cooked up and tasted just like the regular green-skinned types. Lately, I've returned to growing green zucchinis and reserve the golden yellow color for my summer squash dishes. Another squash-of-a-differcnt-color is the scallo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

10 Farm rescue workshops set for 1992 Rescuing an entangled victim from a hay baler is quite different from peeling a wrecked automobile away from the trapped driver or passenger. The Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. pays for a two-day workshop to teach local firefighters and rescue workers how farm machinery works and how to save someone from its jaws. Local Farm Bureau boards. Women's or Young Farmers organizations plan and coordinate the Farm Machinery Safety and Extrication programs. Training sessions are scheduled throughout 1992 as follows: • Goochland County—May 2-3. Contact Wayne Pryor at 804-457-4705. • Scott County—May 16-17. Contact Dick Odle at 703-479-2632. • Buckingham County—June 6-7. Contact Henry Wood Jr. at 804-581-3825- • Westmoreland County—July 11-12. Contact F.F. Chandler Jr. at 804-493-8182. • Hanover County—Aug. 15-16. Contact Laura Stanley at 804-798-5983. • Frederick County—Sept. 12-13. Contact Jim Douglas at 703-667-4757. • Caroline County —Oct. 3...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

April 1992 ANGUS BULL and Commercial Cow Sale. Saturday, April 4,1992,1:00 p.m. Fauquier Livestock Exchange, Marshall, VA. Jerry Crenshaw. 703-554-2552. FOR SALE—HounsheH's black Simmental polled bulls and one red. Square bales of alfalfa hay. 703-686-4055. FOR SALE—Registered poled Hereford buls, breeding age. Crewe, VA. 645-9193. WANTED—Farm or pasture for beef cattle. Spotsylvania or Orange County. 703-399-1208. WANTED—Farm or pasture for beef cattle. Culpeper or Madison County. 703-399-1208. FOUR YEAR OLD registered Angus bull Will sell for $1500. Contact John Moody at 703-686-4624. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN service age bulls. Also open heifers. 703-825-0590. BULLS—IO ANGUS for rent or sell Graperidge Farms, Box 115, Goochland, VA 23063. 804-784-5145. BEEFMASTER—Bred beefmaster heifers, young heifers, young bulls. Louise Evans, 703-682-4457. 10 REGISTERED ANGUS COWS/CALF 1100 lbs +, 6 yrs., must sell. $1,000 ea. Frank Stone, 804-288-9000. REGISTERED GRAY BRAHMAN cattle for sal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1992

Vbi. 51, No. 3 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS April 1992 "Protection. No doubt about it. Our _____pg_p_^ agent helps us plan just the coverage we r 1 [ful need. And they helped me develop a financial strategy for the future. Now my retirement years can be restful years. No wonder Americans from every walk of life depend on Farm Bureau Insurance." VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY .... v . SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Helping you IS SOUTHERN farm bureau annuity insurance company What We Do Best. 200 W. GRACE ST., RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1 234 m - Wm* ri $* • sbbbhi Ibsl I I I I I RJIH il.' .;• Hl^nil 3 c<>^ a^ 1 ' W ? , (?and^ r *< pw,sb ' K— "^ ft * %1 "' an , CorwttW# a „ «* Pagw 1. 8 a"" ' "^

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

Farm Bureau Vol. 51, No. 4 / ' **c ■ I**®' Vv' ' > . - v iSBB>.- «|: ■■ M3^L » '«;.<{ *J? < * -" -"' •' •-■'■ Lewis Blow displays planked shad. (Ptwto by Kathy b spring*™) Study shows wetland conversion slowing WASHINGTON—The latest U.S. Department of Agriculture tally of the nation's wetlands on non-federal rural lands shows the pace of agricultural wetland conversions is slowing significantly. From the spring of 1987 through the spring of 1991, a total of 4 31,000 acres of wetlands on non-federal rural land were converted to other uses, according to a study performed last summer by USDAs Soil Conservation Service. The average annual rate of conversion during the period was 110,000 acres. James Moseley, assistant secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment, said, "The scope of this study was restricted to non-federal rural lands where most agriculture activity takes place. It does not take into account wetland conversio...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1992

2 Clouded view behind proposal requiring soil controls Having worked as a farmer most of my life, I've been called many things—tiller of the soil, practitioner; businessman, pillar of the community and probably some other names not as flattering. Most farmers are viewed in the same light. But today the public has developed a clouded view of agriculture and farming practices. So have many of our lawmakers. Some truly believe what environmental extremists are telling them—that farmers are not concerned about the land and water. You and I know this isn't true. But innocent consumers or well-intentioned lawmakers may not. Therefore, we must prove that our current voluntary methods of improving the environment are working. Otherwise, Senate Bill 1081 will regulate many of us out of business. S. 1081 is a proposal that would amend the 1991 Clean Water Act. It prescribes a new, wide-reaching command and regulatory program to control non-point Where can you learn how to run a small business...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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