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Elephind.com contains 14,999 items from Great Southern Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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An Interrogation Point. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

An Interrogation Point. A new flagman, the first week of his job, was much 'exercised on account of the delay of the "Green Bullet" (the -mile-a-minute flyer). Finally, forty minutes late', the "Green Bullet" came tearing'along at eighty miles an hour. The flagman rushed out with a red flag. The "Green Bullet" stopped with a grinding of 'brakes and a tearing up of ties and road toed. The engine driver leapt down excitedly, and the new flagman said: "Yer late. What kept ye?"

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME CURIOUS FINDS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

SOVE CUSIOUS FINDS. Nature occonni:: clutcr. i. crsel! .to th& most extraordinary conditions of life A. lady lost a £oUl ring. Come tliree <-ears afterwards the laser's cat caught .1 rat, Xrom which pussy had eaten the liead. The neck of the rat was ex posed, and thr owner of the cat saw •omething metallic glittering on the ,-at's neck. On examination, this proved to be the lost werlding-ring, em bedded In the iluoh. The ring must iave been carried by the old rat to its nest, and one of its very young jnes must have thrust its head into It. \s the animal grew larger each day, ts novel and valuable collar became i fixture. The wonder is how nature continued to permit licr living de mands to he supplied through such a miall circumference; yet the creatura .ived, was fat, and looked healthy. Cats in their hunting expeditions •nmetimes meet with an untoward -ite. As some workmen wore felilng amber, they discovered in the centre of one of the trees a cavity in whicn ve...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Great Montamor Case. CHAPTER XXIII. Galling Bonds. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

The Great Monfcamor Base. By ALICE M. DIEHL, ' Authoress of "The Knave of Hearts," CHAPTER XXIII. Galling Bonds. -Strangely enough, when her belov ed, the betrothed husband whose marriage with her at the rural parish church had been roughly interrupted by the woman of whom he said, "I married my cousin Gwendolen—she \ is-' my wife," Netta was relieved, con Xsoled, rather than overwhelmed. V In these crises of life, memory is as vividly awakened as all the other mental faculties. Netta remembered that for fifteen long years her Robert had been dead to his old surround ings and every human soul they en vironed. She recollected that so long a desertion of any wife would go far to break the tie in the case of any man. She reasoned, in a flash, that all was not lost. The law might help her—and her beloved. "But supposing you did marry her, dearest, you deserted her! If she chooses, she can set you free—at ea!r-e, I understood the marriage laws j fr.sed a woman from a husband who deserted...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MILD MYSTERIES. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

MILD MYSTERIES, An army surgeon recently visited the site ol a proposed camping-ground iu order to report upon its sanitary, fitness for occupation during manoeu vres. He was in such a hurry, how ever, that he forgot to procure a sam ple of the y.-ater, but after his return to his quarters he sent a sergeant of "•he Medical Corps to obtain it for him. This sergeant was provided with a air of regulation bottles which he vas crdered to fill from the stream running through the ground. The ser vant was weary with the journey, and ■ailing at an inn, filled his bottles with eer. Eventually, yielding to the at vactions which came in his way, he rrhed uo nearer to the ground than . convenient public-house, where he assed the night. Next morning he lid not trouble to rinse out the drega >f the beer, but filled the bottles from i jug in the bedroom. This is why, iie analyst at Netley Hospital Is puz ling over the water. Some time ago a citizen of Glaros, 11 Switzerland, died shortly before...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Proved by the Proprietor. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

Proved by the Proprietor. Stranger (in a strange restaurant): Look here, waiter, I can't eat this stuff. Take it iback and bring me something decent. Waiter: Sorry, but that's the best we can do. Stranger: It is, eh? Ill show you. Where's the proprietor? Waiter: Gone out to lunch. ""The doctor says I must stop smoking. One lung is nearly gone." "Oh, dear, John. Can't you hold out until we get enough coupons for that dining-room rug?" "Caseell's Magazine of Fiction" and general literature for March is an ex cellent number. The names of the au thors will ensure it a hearty welcome, for this month H. G. Wells contributes and article, and Olive Wadsley, Wal ter Wood, Captain Shaw, Andrew Soutar, and a host of other writers send stories. Humor, illustrations, feminine pages, and a long complete novel add further attractions.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Not One For Happiness. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

Not One For Happiness. Father Why don't you work, my son? I£ you only knew how much bappiness work brings, you would be gin at once. Son:'Father, I am trying to lead a life of self-denial, in which happiness outs no figure. Do not tempt me. The April number of "The Story teller" Magazine is just in. The read er of this fine monthly gets splendid reading. The authors' names are a guarantee of great excellence. Jus tus Miles Forman, Mrs. Baillie Rey 'nolds, Warwick Deeping, I. A. 11. Wy lie, Captain Shaw, J. O. Cm-wood write in this number. These authors could not write poorly if they triad, : and it seems as though they are at their best in this number. Besides tlie above writers H. de Vere Stac poole, author of "The Blue LiUgoon," writes a long complete novel entitled "The Presentation." With all these attractions, it is 110 wonder that the "Storyteller" is so great a favorite with magizine readers.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT THE HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

ABOUT THE HORSE. The Arabian National Stud Book, Vol. 1, has been published in Amer ica, and Sir Walter Gilbey has writ ten the preface, in which he states that up to the present time more than 4000 distinct worlts, in 'various lan guages, liave been devoted to the horse, and among these are nearly ninety in Araibic and Persian, which are specially devoted to the Arab breed. The history of the horse shows that there have been two distinct types in Britain since the time of Julius Caesar. This breed of horse was the anxious care of Parliament from a date prior to the time of King John; and it is noted that the weight a riding horse of this type had to hear, ■ jvith its mail-clad rider and the plate armor .with which it 'was protected, might be upwards of 4cwt„ or 32 stone.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CIRCULAR SAWS OF PAPER. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

CIRCULAR SAWS OF PAPER. Paper is at present used for all pos sible purposes in the industries and in all possible forms. It has even been possible by means of compression to give it a degree of hardness compar able with stone, so that it can be used as building material, The latest use for paper, however, is perhaps the most peculiar. A factory is said to exist in England which is manufactur ing circular saws from paper. These paper saws are used for the manufac turing ot fine furniture, veneer and other thin plates of wood, which must be treated especially carefully. Some time ago circular saws made from drawing paper were shown in an English exposition. The saws were driven by an electric motor and produced fine boards, which could not have been made better even by the finest steel saw. The veneers made In this way are so smooth that the cabinet makers can use them without further planing.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHERE SOUND CANNOT BE HEARD. A Mystery of the Sea. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

WHERE SOUND CANNOT BE | HEARD. I A Mystery of the Sea. •It is a singular and somewhat dis iurbing fact that there frequently ex ists at sea, in the area covered by a fog, what mifUt be described as a zone of silence; that is, a belt of space in which sound cannot be heard. It is the only thing of all others most dreaded by mariners. There may he danger ahead—say, a deadly rock lying right in the vessel's course. The light that marks It, whether from lighthouse or lightship, is blanketed by the fog, but the crew at least expect to hear the warning blast of the fog horn. No such blast reaches them. The sound is c-mi pletely lost in the silence zone, and the first intimation they have of the danger is when the \ i-ssel crashes on the rock. To this causo undoubtedly maj he attributed some of the great disas ters at sea which have puzzled many shore people. There was t/ie case of the Stella, for instance, which ran full tilt on the Casquet Rooks, off Alderney. The Stella was a ra'Iway st...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW AND WHAT TO FEED. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

HOW AND WHAT TO FEKD. Kindness saves fend. And produces better birds. This is very easily understood. A fowl that is con touted makes tb« beet use of the food given it. Whereas a bird that is hunted from pillar to post is too unsettled to grow properly. A man's method of feeding; will de termine, to an observing outsider, juBt what chance he hus of making poultry p»y. The man or woman who goeB along and throws a certain amount of feed be it either mash or grain—into each pen, and pa.sses on at once, is not a good poultryman or poultry woman. Aik! Wthermorc, is not getting the best possible results out "■{ the feed given, for some will have too much and some too little. Whereas the samt> Amount of feed, distributed properly, would satisfy all tho birds and leave nothing o\Vr. There would bo no sour food in tha pens at midday for the hot sun to play upon, and to eventually cause vio lent outbreaks of diarrhoea and "cholera" (so-called). Ap*5 there would bo no empty crop* to filled ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POULTRY. SEASONABLE ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

POULTRY. SEASONABLE ITKIOk Prepare for heat. Provide good sholtor. Keep the water in the shad*. The scratching shed now scorea. Keep up the green-stuff supply. Fight vermin vigorously from now m. Turn the face of the neBts towardi .lie houses. Don't let the sun shine in and spoi :he eggs. Don't leave mash lying round to gel tour and cause trouble. Cleanliness mu.st now be Btudied il wcci'ss is to be attained. A thorough disinfecting of all housei and coops will be in order. And a general whitewashing crusad* will !)« a paying " spcc." A cool, moist patcli in a shady oornoi will make the best summer " dust" bath. Wo are all very clover, but oui grandparents knew as much, or mor* Look over tlio poultry files of tei years ago and you will find the »anw advice, the same discussions, the saou arguments. Wo can't teach the old hand much, but we can remind him of what h« aheadv knows. Wonderful what a lot of people who, knowing nothing abont poultry a yeai ngo,i#are now posing as experts. ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Victorian Fruit Industry. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

Victorian Fruit Industry, j When opening the hort.iculi.nra' show at Pakenhain the other day, Mr Koa t; M.L.A,., spoke at length on 'tlio development of the frnit industry jii.':Victoria. Hi- -mud that in 1904 :t.]ib valno of the fruit sent into the ';\}'elboiir]ie. markets was £345,000, .but a groat increase had taken place, asm, .1911-12 it w.is £558,604. In addition, there was nearly £1,000,000 worth of market gardening produce sonfc- into- the Melbourne markets. 1 ho export trade had considerably increased, and last year the exports i sent away represented nearly 3O0,OOO Lists It was gratifying to find that hi 1913 . Piikenham hud sent away about 5000. tons of fruit from the railway station, out of which 30,000 cases wuro sent for export.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

\ • FOR Autum EffiE5E:l.wr !%. i g> BSE OUR WINDOWS. =03 THE WHITE HOUSE, 0 KOR-CjiM:BXTX&Z&^. 1EI SALE OF DRESS GOODS. DRESS GOODS nil HE DUPED. Special Sale of Dress Goods & Millinery. IMPORTANT TO LADIES! . Wishing to have Dresses or Costumes made for the Show. Our Dressmaking Rooms are uuder New Management, and have been opened under the management of Miss Jacobsen, late of Buckley and Nuuu, Melbourne. Miss Jacobsen comes with first-class references, being five, years with Buckley and Nunn, and other leading houses. SPECIALITY.—Evening Dresses; Wedding Dresses, Tailor Made Coat? v and Skirts, Mourning Orders, and all kinds of work connected with Ladies' Tailoring. A. B. Cr KOBUMBUBBA. Expires 1 CL i My lease having expired it is necess ary for me to move my Stock. / The cheapest way to move it is to sell it. EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD. Now is the time to buy your winter clothing. New Goods just opened ARE TO BE SACRIFICED. ■Ladies' Coats, Furs, Dresses. M...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOOTBALL. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

FOOTBALL. Now that fcho cricket season is practically ovoi', tlioi'o is already a stir among footballers. Loch have had their annual mooting and have decided to join tho Korumburra association. W. Graunon, who played with Loch last year and won the gold medal for best all-rouud player, goes to el bourne on Monday to lia\o a trial with South Melbourne. The auuual meofcing of tho Korum" bnrra association will take place at tho Victoria Hotel 011 Tuesday even ing, April 14, when all arrangements for the coming season will be made. According to rumour some very im portant changes aro to be made in the rules. * The Korumburra club will hold its animal.mooting at tho tiro brigade hall 011 Tuesday evening at S o'clock. Its to bo hoped tlioro will bo a good attendance.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sporting. CRICKET. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

Sporting. CRICKET. ' "Teams representing the township and railway will play a match oil the I show ground on Saturday, and . there is likely to be more , rivalry over it than in a competition fixture. An effort is to be made to start punc tually afc .2.15. A team fy-om the Korumburra as sociation visited Wonthaggi on Sat urday arid secured another victory over that association, though only by the narrow margin of ten runs. Kor uniburra batted first, ' and at the luncheon adjournment had four wic kets down for 64. After the adjourn ment tlio rest of tiie wickets fell quickly, and the Innings closed for 92. J. Maynard bowled well for his side. He took three wickets in his last Over. Wonthaggi also started well, and at the afternoon adjourn ment had only three out for 6i. They too collapsed after the spell, and wore all out for 82. Or. Bliss was in good form with the ball, and got seven wickets for 22. In the second innings Korumburra lost.four wickets for 71. As it was the first occas...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

No 0-?p Kmws The \\ Ni '■! .a nt 11-i s burden. .Many a tiiif: laougliLio light. > ni J h'.imF joii have a biinlcu to boar . Vi ii l.n w here you are taxed to:bear- u ^ mi know how mii- li trnnbl ltirives von hut do vnu know ii.nv to fliake it iju I In- ' acl: hears ni-ue burdens than th ■ llUlllilll Olg.tnlMll '/ Ami u objcciu tu.-i', soou'times- einp'v i.. ally. - . . It aches and panw. n ivra-. and laniCi ' Its v-ur own. Immi il y--u-.don't- come. u. iLu • L^cui:. . • I'urli-<|i8 you doii t ,kn >w hmv We "could icll yau. but y-ui iui(jlu- d-iu.il/ us.: We will let tins'man do it, tlit-n 'tis easier p'oven. - . Mi'U SI lhtjan. Itcnl Orpscent,A\rniit.lmjri;i, nays About three,ynr« a.o L, hid- the uiii-fortun>: to rick my -li'l I: >r months uftonv.-iiiis I sidluroiiMr ii bac ache. I bj lieve ha-l not I tnkon Dna'is H id a —o Killing i iii.i, wliuh were ruejiiiiiiuikIhI t,,r mo by a f iend. 1 would alill.be s llerii'j: These nil* jsuvc me luliuf very cjiiu'lcly...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HE WON HIS CASE. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

HE WON HIS CASE. We all know the class of client a man I is said to have who is his own lawyer. As a rule, no doubt, it is wiser to trust one's case to a learned "gentleman/ but, now and then, a man can do bet ter for himself than the best lawyer can Co for him. The following proves it:— A doctor named Royston sued a far mer named Peter Bennett for his fees, Jong overdue, for attending Bennett'; wife. A lawyer named Stephens was engaged by Bennett and another nam ed Toombs appeared for the doctor The doctor proved his number of virits, and their value according to local cus tom. Mr. Stephens, for the defendant, told him that the physician had ma'U out his case, and as there was nothing wherewith to rebut or offset the claim, the only thing to do was to pay it. " No," said Peter; "I engaged you to speak to my case, and now speak to it." Mr. Stephens told him that there was nothing to say he had looked on to see that the case was made out, and it was. Peter was obstinate and at last M...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRAPPING THE DISHONEST. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

TRAPPING THE DISHONEST. It is an old tale about the funn^ inan I l'n an omnibus, who, after stopping mid picking something from the Moor, asked has anyone dropped half a sovereign. Two or three • passengers immediately felt in their pockets, and each quickly said he-'nad droned it. The man then .'called the conductor, and said: "Get a light, these gentle men have dropped some money here." The following is a little variant on that - Biorv • A huntsman was travelling home by rail, and in the carriage, when he en tered, there "were already five other, men. lie, seeing a parcel of thin papers on the floor under the seat, pick ed them up. Looking at them, and the. at his companions, he asked if any ^ntlenian had lost a bundle of papers out of his pocket. Every man, in succession, replied in the negative, and at last the iiuntsman called the station-master, -who -was on the plat form, and as the train was moving off handed the bundle to him, saying: "As they appear to be bank notes, I had...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
[?]ow Mr. Goodson look Care of the Baby. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

"Tow Mr. Goodson loon Care of the Baby. She was a meek little woman, with blue eyes, and fair hair parted over a J .madonna-like forehead, and she car- ; tied a fretting baby in her arms. He ■ was a big man with a square jaw, and an expression ol determination, a: d he had a satchel, a cunt, and ail ui1- j brella. aThe little woman gave a tir. d : sigh, and shifted the baby from h :r right arm to her left as she droned J into the first available seat, in the rail way station. ' "Oh, dear, -I sometimes think I never will try to go anvwhere again, it is such hard work getting started," she said. "Work?" - sneered the -big inaii. "That's just tire Way with ia wohiaii! I should like to know hosv <rou'd got along if you were in my place? Why. I : Btayed in the oilice until eleven o'clock | came home, shaved and got ready, found a cabman, locked up the house, ■ rode down here and. looked after the luggage, and you haven't done a thing but take care of that baby." "But, Henry, h...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RIFLE SHOOPING. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 2 April 1914

Ill PL E SHOOTING. A team from tlio Korumburra club visited Leongatha on Saturday, but were defeated by 26 points. Follow ing aro the Scores Knrumburr.i. 503y.h GWyds T'l Wobb 33 32 05 Guard 30 32 Gi Para 2!) . 25 52 Tack 28 22 50 Uolinos 27 25 52 A.escliHuviii 25 ID •It liailoy 23 17 - 40 Totals 195 170 3G5 Looncatha. 500yila bO'Jvls T'l Harvay 2S ' 57 Johnstono 32 28 GO Maddorn 30 25 55 Mathowinan -30 ' .1!) . . 4'J Williams 35 i28 G5 Cross 28 32 GO Nelson 2G 21 47 Totals 200 182 3«J1

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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