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Elephind.com contains 1,638,200 items from News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MODERN ROBINSON CRUSOES Life On Tristan da Cunha LOVELIEST ISLAND IN THE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

MODERN ROBBINSON CRUSOES Life On Tristan da Cunha LOVELIEST ISLAND IN THE WORLD In a few weeks they would have been living like shipwrecked sailors on seabirds' eggs and fish. Such was the state of affairs on Tristan da Cunha when H.M.S. Dublin, from Cape Town, arrived with stores on March 26. The detailed story of life on this "loneliest island in the world" is graphically described by the special correspondent of Cape "Argus," who went with the warship when she called at the little islanud that lies 1,500 miles off the Cape of Good Hope. Four aisland boats, wonderful canva 1 craft, were soon alongside H.M.S. Dub lin whe she dropped her anchor in Falmouth Bay, off the settlement. Trembling with emotion, hardly able to stammer his welcome, Mr. Rogers was amona the first on board. New faces after months of exile' His feelings could easily be understood. The Bishop of St. Helena (the Right Rev. H. Holbech), who had come spe cially to visit the most remote ,arish of his diocese, shook ...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
NEW ELEMENT ISOLATED Hafnium In London NEW ZEALAND DEPOSIT [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

NEW ELEIMENT ISOLATED Hafnium In London NEW ZEALAND DEPOSIT The new element called hafnium, ha. beenh isolated by Dr. Alexander ScoLt in his private laboratory in London. He has been able to show spelcimens of the oxide. a cinnamon-colored powder, to a meeting of the Chemical Society. to state its atomic weight and describe its chemical nature (says the Lundon "Times"). A short time .ro two young chemists, Coster and Hevesy, working in the la boratory of Professor Bohr, at Copen hage, announced that by the method of X-ray spectroscopy they had ascer tained the existence of an unknown element, occupying No. 72 in the table of elements arranged by the brilliant young English physicist Moseley. French .chemists had already assigned this number to a supposed rare-earth clement, which they called celtium. but Coster and Heresy showed reasons for doubting their results. The ele ment to which they gave the name haf nium they believed to be a metal in the group in which titanium and zirco n...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
NOMAD'S LIFE On High Asiatic Plateaus RUGGED AND SIMPLE [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

On HiighAsiatic Plateaus --- RUGGED'AND SIMPLE No one can look at a simple Tibetan nomad and remain unmoved. He may smell and smell strongly; he may be weird and perhaps frighten you: he may be dirty and probably is, but somehow he fascinates you from the moment you first see him. There is an indes'bribable something- is it his gait, his dress, his face, his talk-he is peculiar in every way andJ different from everything you evei looked at. On his head he* wears any tlhing that will stick, from the dirtiestj old rags to the most costly fox skins on his body he wears anything that wiui. hang, from a strong woollen kimona to a heavy, rank smellinig sheepskin; on his feet he wears a contrivance designed to keep in the heat and keep out thel cold. The natural habitat of the Tibetani nomad is the high, wide, open, grassy plateau. There, with his sheep, yakr,I horses and tents, he is perfectly atj home. His ncarcst neighbor may be a day or a week away, but that mat ters vcery little as he...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
HOW DEEP DO WHALES DIVE? [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

HOW DEEP DO WHALES DIVE? Both whalers and naturalists have held that when whales "sound." they descend to great depths. One authoiity of the mates that the larger memnber; oof the group dive fully 3,000 yards. An other autho:rity challenSges this ,belief. and states thal, ill his upinion, 100 yards is the maximum depth to which any whale can dive, and that many -pe cies do not reach anything like that limit. "Why should whales wish to go to such depths?" asks this authority. of obtaining food; Uand in the profound darkneas ot 1,000 yards what food could they get? 'Those species which fetd on animalIcules might perhaps obtam what they ' \ant. But how about the species which :feed on lishes and cut ties? At a depth of 1,000 ya.rds they certainly could not use their eyes to detect non-luminous species, and we have no evidence whatever that they red on the self-luminous deep-sea fis; and cuttles, If. inded, there be any of the latter. On the contrary, the avail able evidence indicates t...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
ROOF OF AFRICA "Cooking Place of God" VOLCANOES AT 14,000 FEET [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

ROOF OF AFR AI, "Cooking Place of God" VOLCANOES AT 14,000 FEET "'The Birunga Volcanoes of Kigezi R·uanda-Kivu," was the title of a paper read by Captain J. E. T. Philtipps at a meeting of the London Royal Society. Captain Phillips said that t·hd high country surrounding this range (which consisted of eight principal mountansi) had been called the roof of Africa. It' lay immediately north of Lake Kivu, partly in the Uganda Protectorate and partly in the Belgian Congo. In it were situated sct-ne of the ultimate sources both of the Congo and the Nile. :!i Karagwe the natives refered to the vol canoes as "the-coking-place-of-God." The most impressive view of the range was probably in the British dis trict of Kigezi, from the lip of the Be lungi ridge. The only road from Bri tish territory climbed the Behungi hill through bamboo forests from the cast. It was thus' that the vast panorama burst upon one with unexpected sud denness. It made one catch one's breath in admiration and astonish...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
MAD MULLAH Never Seen By An Englishman [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

MAD MULLAH Never Seen By An Englishman Tn "The Mad Mullah of Somaliland" Mr. Douglas Jardine, who was Secre tary to the Administration, Somaliland, 1916-21, has written a valuable and en tertaining account of a "little war" which lasted on and off for 21 years, from 1899, and eventually in 1920 was brought to a victorious finish in 21 days. Seyyid Mohammed's vendetta with the British Empire was partly politi cal. partly religiou.s. Claiming suze rainty over all Somali tribes, he re sented certain tribes placing themselves under British protection. And he "per sueded himself that allegiance to a non-Mohammedan Pover was a definite barrier to the religious progress of his fellow-countrymen." No misfortune ever broke his spirit, and he always scoffed at the extremely faLvorable terms of peace, that were offered him. In the end he was~' neither captured nor hilled in battle, but died Ignomi niously of influenza on November 23. 1920. a fugitive in Abyssinian territory. An odd fact concer...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
CRABS THAT CLIMB TREES Monsters of the Pacific [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

CRABS THAT CLIMB TREES Monsters of the Pacific In his book "Atolls of the Sun" Mr. Frelderick O','t'Fien describes with enter taining charm his "'experiences, im Dre'ossions. antl dre.ams" on the strange coral reefs of the Pacifi:, where a "delicate green fringe of trees" sur rounds each still lagoon and marks a sunken isle r. O'IBrien has seen with his own ieyes the monstrous robber crab \which clihmbs the trees and sReizes r'ecple'. hair. "'As he floated unon the quiet surface of the pale-green lagoon. on the coral in th~e deceptive half lig-ht of the prelpuscle was a hideous she'll-backed mnonster, which had emerged .from an unseen :la.r and movedl :slowly and lumberingiy towards the cocoanut trees. Its motions and appearance in the semi chbsculrty took on the quality of a dream-beast, :tffrighting in its amaz ing novelty. It -was like a great pepiler-machoe animal in ;a panto mime," He goes on to say how. "beset with apprehension that it might advance to the lagoon . . . I swam ...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

i 2 ??'oC T ?? ??? THEATRE BACK AGAIN-BACK AGAIN Commencing Saturday Next. J. & N. TAIT present ?y arrangement with E. J. CARROLL, S THE ONE AND ONLY - HARRY LAUDER Back again at.,he height of his world Sfame, with A POWERFUL COMPANY OF INTERNATIONAL STARS ' ; Remember S' ATURDAIY NEXT. BOXPIA.N;S OPEN AT ALLAN'S TO-MORROW :,OCI.N!NG AT 9. PREFER NT.":'!. PLANS CLOSE AT THEATI: OFIFICE TODAY. rRICES-D-I; e Circ'l2 acd Res. Ftalls. P/: Back Sta.l!'. 1/: Gallery. 1/6; .a'rly Ganllery, '2 ;: Gr.!llry Partics, ::/. Prcrerential bookinz, 2/. extra (plus HERE.) IEP.EERT '":2'iiS, lenirencnl.t,.iVc. Lessees, H-larry iickards Tivoli Theatres, Ltd. Directiou . . lx & Blaker, Limnited. MAessrs. Dix & Baker piresent Musgrcve'' Celebrity Vaudeville, by arrangenent with larry G. Mttsgrove, of the Tivoli Theatres, Sydney, and Melibo~ rne. TON~1IHT AT 8. Matinee, Wednesday, at 2.30 "Familiar in their moutha as household words." Dix & Bakr's wondterful presenta tiona...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
TRAMS COLLIDE Nobody Injured BROKEN PIPE AND SPECTACLES [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

TRAMS COLLIDE Nobody Injured BROKEN PIPE AND SPECTACLES Passengers on two tramcars had their moment of excitement this morning when a collision occurred in Pui tenev street. "There's nothing much in it," said an official this morning. "One of the cars was bound for Torensville and the other for Parkide. The Torrens ville car was. at the compulsory stop at Pulteney stret, when thc other car bumped into it. Naturally there was. no great speed at the time.. "The damage to the car is not seri ous. Beyond a little broken glass and a bent end it was not damaged. - Nobody was badly injured. One pas senger conipalined that he bumped,his elbow, orie that his spectacles were broken, and another that-his pipe.was smashed. The motorman on the second car was cut by broken glass and sent home. "Nobody was sent to hospital, no great inconvenience was caused to the passengers, and tratfic was not held up." It. is probab!e that skidding on.' tW rails caused the impact, but no oflti" stfntment hns he...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
WORLD IN REVOLT Woodrow Wilson's Fears U.S.A. MUST GO TO RESCUE (UNITED SERVICE.) NEW YORK, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

WORLII IN RE 0LT Woodrow Wilson's Fears U.S.A. MUST GO TO RESCUE (UNITED SERVICE.) SN~ W YORK, July 29. Dr. Wvoodrowv Wilson, formerly Pro* sident of America, .has broken his long silence with air article for the August number of "'Thy Atlantic .Monthly.", in which nhe fearrs .thret will b: a world revolutorio- unless: the?~Thited :-ta? g H e~e tl'-~, i.be · ist~ct~'lih': ;5r..T WiI~oin: !cg l appears at a ;th·ltc oxice abweekl and takes9. occasional diives. HeO hfi apparently reainged a. mieSurc of jhis healfh; but :.!ooks pale, worn, and atged. He is merel~y a wr'eck com?pnard with his former self. One arm is p)aralysod. Theli. articl, touches an ala!rmist note, and reflects a certain religious fervor Mr. Woodrow Wilson. which was lacking in the former :Pr sident's war-time utterances. It says:, "The ruad ahead is darkened with shadows portendcing many dangers." Dr. Wilson refers lengthily to the Russian revolution, which in his opinion is traceable to a systematio denial to a gre...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
(REUTER'S.) LONDON, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

(REUTER'S.) LONDON, July 29.. The delivery of the French reply :to Great Britain. which was ready ot P'hursday evening, ha~ lieen ptstponec owing to delay in the compiletion of the Belgian Note, Paris and Brussels hav? ing agreed that both Notes, should be mutually seen and approved Wftoren de livery, says a message frem Paris. It is now authoritatively stated that the Notes wlll be presented on Monday or Tuesday.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
REPLIES TO GERMANY Expected By Tomorrow (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

REPLIES TO GERAIVINY Expected By Tomorrowi (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 29. The French press regarqd .the coming seek as likely to be decisive according to the Paris correspondent of "The Times." In some quarters it is consi dered that the possibility has arisen ot Great Britain replying directly to Germany because the French reply Is o0 a nature likely to lead to a contnuance of diplomatic conversations. France asks a series of questions of rGeat Britain, particularly with regard to inter-allied debts. The Belgian reply is described as con structive, realistic, and more to ..tho point, but does not differ greatly fromn the French Note on the principal points. Whether Great Britan will agree to en gage in further diploma.tic searchingf while the danger in Gernhany rapidly in creases remains to be seen. ..

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
CRICKETERS DO WELL (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 27. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

CRICKETERS DO WELL (UNITJED SERV'ICE.) e d ....1,)LONDON, July 27. Hearne and Fendei- have each taken 100 wickets- and scored. 1,000 runs this 'wrss·n.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
ENGLISH CRICKET Reasons For Failure LEADING PLAYERS' OPINION (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 27. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

ENGIISBU'U U;EI?EUTL,? Reasons For Failure LEADINfi PLAYERS' OPINION (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 27. Replying to A. C. MacLaren's view that class should be the deciding: factor in selecting test- cricketers, C. B. Fry says batsmen of test standard must be able. to. et fours off the best length balls of the best bowlers of the day. "The secret of our failure in tsts," he said, "is our absolute lack of organisa tion. You. should not put into the field d scratch team., each member feeling that lid is on approval. How can duch a. team plaiy Australia, which Plays as a team?" Charles Parker, the All-England bow ler, says men:. hould be selected wvho can play both on fast'and slow wickets.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
PUBLIC REASSURED Bloodshed Not Feared (PUBLISHED IN "THE TIMES.") LONDON, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

PUBLIC REASSURED Bloodshed Not Feared (PUBLISHEID IN "'*-T?T TIMES.") LO?NDON, July 29. Tlie coliapse of ...u em.a.... . de monstrations has .removed tie public Lear and the danger. of bloodshed and rioting (says tne special Berhln cor'es pondent of "The Tanes"): Attention is now centred on the political crisi:;. During the past month people of all shades of opinion have been more or less violently critiucising the Government for letting the financial situation grow worse without moving a hand to help, but have refrained from attacking it owing to the fear of encouraging the French. The latest'development is that each of theparties has summoned its mein bers and discussed the position. The basis of the'discussions is the conviction which is shared generally, that things cannot be. allowved to drift any longer. "Vorwarts" makes it clear that the Socialist Party, on the neutrality of which the Government depends,. dces not intend to remain passive any lon ger, Herr Mueller (secretary ...

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
POTSDAM PACIFIC Beer Mugs, Not Bombs (UNITED SERVICE.) LONDON, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

POTSDAM "PACIFIC Beer Mugs, Not Bombs (UNITED SERVICE.) h LONDON, July 29. The much-trumpeted nonster Com mrunist dmonstratio6 at P}otsdam dwvipdled:. to: ,tran'quil meetings -at two 4~~~b~i4a·1 Wr ::.says a. amL.ies presen~t i, l~lkiin .large mugs: o af beer.: T'hey istenied .placidly to an orator ex plaiiing what n, big bully the Govern ment was. Twenty-three indoor . meetings were held at Berlin, but passed off quietly. At Colognle a-few small groups cudea vored to congregate, but the police dis Ipersed them. Tihe French. prohibited all demonstra tions at Essen, particularly a m:nuch to wards Bochumn, where the Communists had previously decided to concentrate their followers from the whole of ilhe Ruhr.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
TEN THOUSAND MARCH Meetings Not Disorderly LONDON, July 29. LONDON, July 29. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

TEN THOUSAND MARCH Meetings Not Disorderly S(REUTER'S.) LONDON, July 29. LONDON, July 29. An official message frcrm Berlin itates that reports received show that "the Communist meetings held this nirmning irdifferent parts of Germany passed qo quietly. Attendances at the demon strations were declared to be poor. Ten thousand demonstrators took parIlt in a procession at Liepzig, but there as no disorder.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
S.A. Gas Company Expansion [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

S.A. Gas Company Expansion With the extension of housebuilding in all the suburbs around Adelaide there is an increasing demand for both gas and electricity. In order to cope with the requirements of consumers the South Australian Gas Company pro poses to extend its plant and reticula tion mains, and at a special meeting on August 30 will seek the authority of shareholders to borrow on mortgage or bond the sum of £150,000 for the'pur poses mentioned.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
New Zealand Insurance Co. [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

New Zealand Insurance Co. New Zealand Insiuirance Comnpany has announced its intention to recommend shareholders to agree to. the capitali sation of £150,000 of the reserve fund. By doing so 2/ a share will be added to the face value of the shares, which number 1,500,000 of 20/ each paid up to 10/. As a result of the capitalisation the liability upon the shares will be reduced to 8/ a share. The reserve fund has been built up out of profits, and it stood in the last balance sheet, at £350,000, While the reser-ve for unex pired risks was £545,000. The resources of the company will be unaffected by the proposed change, although share :holders will be in a better position because of the reduction in their lia bility on shares held.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
Sicilian Almonds [Newspaper Article] — News — 30 July 1923

Sicilian Almonds Sicilian exporters are now offerin4 new season's nuts for October-November shinment to Australia. Bost quality large softshell almonds are quoted at 127/6 per 220 lb., plus duty of 2d. a lb.: hardshell almonds, 67/6 per 220 lb.; selected Naples walnuts in in shell, 12.5/6 per 220 ib., put up in 50 kilos (110 lb.) bags: and large Naples chest nuts (guaranteed fresh and sound), 65/6 per 220 lb., put up in 40/50 kilos. bag or chest. These prices are c.i.f. Port Adelaide. Last season, it is understood. some business was dlone by Melbourne and Sydney buyers in Sicilian nuts, but so far. as can be learned there were no direct imports into South Aus tralia.

Publication Title: News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: SA, Australia
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