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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WHAT NEXT? SUBMARINES TO CROSS THE CHANNEL IN HALF AN HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

WHAT NEXT? SUBMARINES TO CROSS THE CHAN-   NEL IN HALF AN HOUR.   The Paris correspondent of the London "Ex-   press," writing on December 1, says:—I under-   stand that M. Baudin, the Minister for Public   Works, is captivated with the idea of making the   Channel passage in half an hour by means of sub-   marine boats (particulars about which were given   in "The World's News" of December 21.)   The proposal is that an electric cable should   be stretched between Calais and Dover, and the   submarines would derive their motive power from   it much as the tramcars obtain theirs from the   overhead wires. Some interesting experiments   with the view of testing its practicability were   carried out yesterday in the Seine at St.   Denis with a Goubet submarine.   M. G...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ALCOHOL FUEL LOCOMOTIVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ALCOHOL FUEL LOCOMOTIVES. While small alcoholic motors have been in use for some time, it is only lately that engineering skill has succeeded in constructing a satisfac- tory alcohol locomotive. The invention must be looked upon as a boon to Germany, where about 100,000,000 gallons of alcohol are distilled an- nually from potatoes alone. From a technical and commercial standpoint the alcohol motor begins to receive more favorable notice, because it shows decided advantages over others—pe- troleum motors, for instance. The alcohol is changed from its fluid into gaseous form, and, after being mixed with atmospheric air, is ignited by an electric spark. There is no residue favoring the formation of rust, and the process is absolutely odorless. By-and-by luckless in- ebriates may be carried to the police station in automobiles driven by King Alcohol.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Final Fling. LAST OF THE DRUCE CASE. MRS. DRUCE AND THE JUDGE. SOME AMUSING ENCOUNTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Final Fling. LAST OF THE DRUCE CASE. —♦— MRS. DRUCE AND THE JUDGE. SOME AMUSING ENCOUNTERS. (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.) LONDON, December 6.—After long months of     profitless, if lively, guerilla warfare, Mrs. Anna     Maria Druce got to grips with the main com-   mando of the enemy on Tuesday last, when Mr. Justice Barnes and a special jury (empanelled at the lady's request) commenced the hearing of the probate suit of Druce v. Young—an action insti- tuted by Anna Maria for the revocation of a will dated March 28, 1860, and a codicil of November 11, 1864, of Mr. Thomas Charles Druce, who is alleged to have departed this life on December 28, 1864, but whose demise did not, according to Mrs. Druce, occur until 1879. According to her contention T. C. Druce was none other than the   fifth Duke of Portland.   The case opened in a promising fashion, for   a question arose as...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TORPEDO-DESTROYER AND MAILBOAT. TWO MEN DROWNED. BRAVERY OF THE SAILORS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

TORPEDO-DESTROYER AND MAIL-   BOAT.   TWO MEN DROWNED.   —♦ — BRAVERY OF THE SAILORS.   Early in December cables were received indi-   cating a further disaster to one of His Majes-   ty's torpedo-destroyers. According to the latest   English papers, the collision between the Salmon   and the Great Eastern Railway Company's mail   steamer Cambridge, near Harwich, was a serious   affair, two firemen being drowned and two se-   verely scalded.   The accident took place at about a quarter   past 11 o'clock at night. At that time the   Salmon and five other destroyers (Cheerful, Lee,   Avon, Haughty, and Sturgeon) were on their   way to the mouth of the Orwell, having steamed   during the afternoon from Dover. The Salmon   was at the tail of the flotilla. T...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INTERESTING PIANO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

INTERESTING PIANO. A very interesting pianoforte is now on view   at a gallery in Berners-street. It is believed to   have belonged to Mozart, and it is one of the   earliest specimens of the piano as we know it—   that is to say, of a keyed instrument whose   strings are struck with a hammer. It is square in shape, and it has the peculiarity found in many old instruments, namely, white sharps and black naturals. Considering its age, which must be at least 110 years, the instrument is in re- markably good condition, and produces a beau- tifully sweet and full tone.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ADDING INSULT TO INJURY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ADDING INSULT TO INJURY.   "I sye, guv'nor, 'ave ye seed a bull pup?"—   "Westminster Budget."   Wash the hair in lukewarm, not cold water,   which induces greyness. For fair hair the best   wash is two tablespoonfuls of soft soap and a   small piece of ammonia to a quart of soft hot   water.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Largest English Locomotive. A POWERFUL EXPRESS ENGINE. BUILT FOR THE NORTH-EASTERN RAILWAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

Largest English Locomotive. A POWERFUL EXPRESS ENGINE. BUILT FOR THE NORTH-EASTERN RAILWAY. Of late years the North-eastern Railway has     been well in the lead among English railroads   in appreciating the tendency of locomotive     development and introducing the most advanced     ideas. This is largely due to the initiative of     Mr. Wilson Worsdell, chief mechanical engineer     of the North-eastern Railway, who has been al-     ways rather closely in touch with American     ideas, and whose predecessor in office spent a     considerable period of time in the Pennsylvania     Railway shops at Altoona.   With a view to meeting the increasing de-     mands of the North-eastern Railway Company's &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEA-GREEN SHIPS. BRITISH WAR VESSELS CHANGE COLOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

SEA-GREEN SHIPS. BRITISH WAR VESSELS CHANGE COLOR. The annual attempt to find out the best color for invisibility at sea is being made by the Lords who direct his Majesty's Navee. Drab and light grey have long been favorites, but these are now giving place to sea-green, a sickly shade, which the handy man will emulate in his garments of oilskin if not in his fighting kit. The new color is to be tried on the Channel Squadron. A green navy will be about as palatable as a khaki army, with the difference that there will not be so much parade of it by individuals. Jack himself, questioned on the subject of sea colors, says that buff is the best fighting color. That was good enough in Nelson's time, and no man, he says, will want his shirt on in a modern battleship when the real inferno commences. But meanwhile Jack and his ship are to be experimentally green. Whitehall says so. The Channel Squadron puts to sea this month, and the dockyard painters are mixing the new invisibility in their...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LONDON CHATTER. A FEW FANCY RUMORS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

LONDON CHATTER.     A FEW FANCY RUMORS.   (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)   The Church papers are much concerned at the rumors that the Coronation office is to be much curtailed; that the celebration of the Holy Com- munion, the anointing of the Sovereign, and the Homage of the Nobles is to be "cut." The omis- sion of the King's sacring and of his unction would, they consider, be the missing of the whole meaning of the rites. The anointing is the one distinctively sacred act by which the King is set apart his Holy Office. As, however, other papers declare that the Coronation ceremony will be an almost exact reproduction of that of 1838, it will be time enough to discuss the ques- tion when we have something more than rumor to go upon. Another rumor, probably based merely on the fancy of the chronicler, is to the effect that the lily-of-the-valley, the Queen's favorite flower, will be the most prominent in the Coronation decoratio...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Coronation. CLAIMS TO TAKE PART. CHAMPION OF ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Coronation. CLAIMS TO TAKE PART. —*— CHAMPION OF ENGLAND. The proceedings of the Court of Claims in con-   nection with the forthcoming Coronation furnish   some most quaint and curious incidents.   At the sitting of the Court just before the last   mail left London the following claims were lodged   and argued:—   Mr. Frank Dymoke, at the opening of the pro-   ceedings, claimed, as owner of the Manor of   Scrivelsby, to appear during the Coronation cere-   monies as "Champion of England" at the West-   minster Hall banquet, and asked for a revival in   his favor of the Baronetcy granted to his prede-   cessor in title of Scrivelsby in lieu of his render-   ing services at the last two Coronations.   The Lord Chancellor ruled that the Court in   the circumstances had no jurisdiction over...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EATEN BY WOLVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

EATEN BY WOLVES. Edward Connors, 18 years of age, was devoured by a pack of wolves in November in the Gatineau district. He had left the camp near Bark Lake in the evening and gone back for his axe to have it ground for the next day's work. A party started to look for the missing man, and they had not gone far before it became evident that their worst fears had been realised. The hungry animals had overpowered the poor fellow, and literally torn him to pieces; his boots and cloth- ing, torn to shreds, and soaked with blood, alone being found. Connors' home is in St. Malachi, a few miles from Buckingham, and he was the sole support of five young brothers and sisters, their parents having been dead for some time.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CZOLGOSZ IN WAX. HIS BROTHER AS SHOWMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

CZOLGOSZ IN WAX. HIS BROTHER AS SHOWMAN.   The American is the supreme showman. In a theatre in an American city a wax figure of Czolgosz, M'Kinley's assassin, is exhibited every day, clad in a suit formerly worn by the deceased criminal. The brother of Czolgosz ap- pears with the figure, and makes speeches. The Superintendent of Police has also learned that the proprietor of the theatre had arranged with Czolgosz's brother to turn the body over to him, and, having failed in that, he made a year's contract with the brother to appear with the wax figure.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RIVERS OF BLAZING OIL. REMARKABLE FIRE SPECTACLE IN NEW YORK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

RIVERS OF BLAZING OIL   REMARKABLE FIRE SPECTACLE IN   NEW YORK.   Property to the value of fully £200,000 was destroyed by a disastrous fire in East Eleventh street, New York, a month or so ago. The fire started at 6 o'clock in the wood- working factory of Messrs. Uptegrove Brothers at the corner of Avenue B. The factory, con- taining expensive machinery and cedar, mahogany, and other valuable timber, was completely destroyed. All the available fire forces and police reserves were called out, but despite the efforts of 300 firemen the fire spread to the adjoining supply depot of the Standard Oil Company, where enor- mous quantities of benzine, kerosene, naphtha, and crude oil were stored. The falling walls demolished the tanks and barrels, and caused terrific explosions. Thous- ands of gallons of burning fluids poured down the street in a huge torrent, sweeping into the East River. The shipping at the piers was endangered, and had to be hastil...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A HUNDRED DATS' FAST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A HUNDRED DAYS' FAST. People are willing to pay in order to see a human being starve himself to death in 30 days; but we are informed of a hog who fasted for more than three times that period without fee or reward. About the latter part of July a farmer missed a fine hog. No trace of the animal was found until the end of October, when some boys heard cries issuing from a hole. Upon examination, it was found to be the miss- ing hog in a small cave. One boy descended with a rope, caught the animal, and fastened a rope around its body, and when it was drawn to the surface it commenced to eat leaves, sticks, etc., ravenously. The hog had been in the cave without food or water for over 100 days. It is still too weak to walk or stand, and only weighs 50lb., but is said to be in good health, and with proper care will recover.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FASHION IN BOAS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE FASHION IN BOAS. A very fashionably-dressed Englishwoman out for a morning walk at Monte Carlo has been the originator of a new style of boas. On her shoulder was seated a beautiful little black and white ouistiti, and his long, bushy tail, which was twice the size of the little monkey, was twisted around the lady's neck.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ODD THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

ODD THOUGHTS.   Many people are never happy unless they are ill, or think they are. The average man spends half of his life in the acquiring of knowledge, and the rest of his years in endeavoring to forget it. A woman may love to master a man, but she never loves the man she masters. Don't flatter yourself that a woman loves you. She only loves the man she thinks you are. I hold it truth that he who clings With might and main to what he owns, Is mostly one who "makes no bones" If he can stick to "other things." Humanity mostly goes crooked when it fol- lows the bent of its own mind. Friends are like diamonds, they shine best who have the most faces.   BY "JIMMY."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

    A GREAT OPPORTUNITY.   Conjuror (pointing to a large cabinet): "Now, ladies and gentlemen, allow me to exhibit my concluding trick. I would ask any lady in the company to step on the stage and stand in this cupboard. I will then close the door. When I open it again the lady will have vanished without leaving a trace behind." Gentleman in front seat (aside to his wife): "I say, old woman, do me a favor and step   up."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RUSSIAN PEASANT. HIS FOOD METHODS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE RUSSIAN PEASANT. HIS FOOD METHODS. A correspondent, "E.W.K.," favors us with   some interesting facts about the Russian   peasant, a paragraph regarding which appeared   in "The World's News" of January 4. He   writes:—   "In your interesting paper of the 4th inst., on   page 20, in the article 'The Russian Peasant,'   there is the following:—'He is fond of mush-   rooms, which he finds in abundance, and these, with rye bread, onions, and sausages, are his sta- ple diet.' This is not quite right. There are other kinds of grain besides rye, as oats, barley, wheat, buckwheat, peas, and beans, which are prepared in many ways, and are made into a variety of dishes. "But cabbage is the vegetable without which the Russians would find it hard to live. Potatoes come next, which, boiled or baked, and a salt her- ring, make a very good meal for them. "They like beetroot, horseradish, ca...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Torpedo Boat Destroyer in Mid-winter. TWENTY KNOTS AN HOUR. THROUGH SNOW AND SPINDRIFT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

A Torpedo Boat Destroyer in Mid-winter. TWENTY KNOTS AN HOUR. —♦— THROUGH SNOW AND SPINDRIFT. At no time or season is life on board the torpedo-boat, or her bigger sister the destroyer,   a particularly happy one; but in winter it be-   comes so hard and painful that Dr. Johnson,   could he be resuscitated, would assuredly de-   clare with renewed emphasis that no man with   contrivance enough to get into gaol would be   found in a torpedo craft. From the lightness of   the hull the crew suffer much from cold, as there   is only a thin sheet of metal between them and   the cold water. But the severest trial of all is   heavy weather, which may be said to be normal   in British waters in the winter.   It used to be thought that torpedo-boats and   destroyers were only fair-weather craft, but now   all nav...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REWARD FOR GOODNESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

REWARD FOR GOODNESS. Mamma: "You have been very good this morn- ing, Mary. Now what reward would you like? Mary: "I would like to be allowed to be   naughty all the afternoon."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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