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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

4i ST. BENEDICT'S MEDAL. Continued. Thk Indian Advocate. Cru. Snnctl Patris Benedict!. Otu Sacia Sit Milii LllW Non Draco Sit Mllil Dux. Vade KetioSatana! Minquam Suade Milii Vjiuji; Sunt Mala Quae Litas MU Tlio Cross of Holy Father Benedict. Oil, May the Gross :i light be unto me. And not a guide the wicked enemy. Get thee behind me. Satan! Never suggest vain things to mo. Evil are the draughts thou otTetesi. May st thou drink thy own poison. Tpso Venena Bibas. 2nd. DESCRIPTION OF THE MEDAL. Every medal of St. Benedict bears' on one side a cross with a certain number of letters, the whole looking like a puzzle, as may be seen in the above cut. There are twenty seven letters, not counting the three letters in the Latin word Pax, which means peace. Nine letters are inside the cross; four within the arms of the cross, and the remaining fourteen in the margin or circle around the cross and its field, seven on each side. The letters C. S. P. B. within the arms of the cross are the initi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

42 Thk Indian Advocate. Guide. In the margin of the Medal: Beginning on the right hand at the top: V. R. S. N. S. M. V. S. M. Q. L. I. V. B. V. R. S. Vade Retro Satanas, or, Get thee behind me Satan ; N. S. M. V. mean, 'Nuiiiquara Suade Milii Vana, Never suggest to me vain things. Beginning on the left, at the bottom: S. M. O. L. Sunt Mala Quae Libas They are evil the draughts thou offerest; I. V. B. Ipse Veneua Bibas Mayst thou drink thy own poison. On some4 medals, instead of the word Pax, are the three initials I. H. S., Iesu Ho milium Salvator Jesus, Savior of Men. to be continued. CORRESPONDENCE. (jrEY. DOM 1L I ordained, sent I I gave to eight V- childrc kEV. DOM ILDEPIIOSE ELISSALDE, O. S 'I'.., recently sent us a very interesting account of a retreat he ighteen Kiowa, Commanche and A pa die Indian en of St. Patrick's Mission, at Anadarko, Okla. Ter., Rev. Dom. Isidore, O. S. 13., Pastor, in preparation for their first TToly Communion, some weeks ago. The young missionary des...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

The Indian Advocate. 43 (meaning the priest), chief woman (alluding- to the superioress), heap talk Jesus and heap like him." Then pointing-to the school not far away, "that man (the teacher there) heap'talk Jesus it was a school of some protectant denomination but heart not in it; money heap he like." lie relates that at Chickasha, having purchased a ticket for Ana darko. he was at a loss to lind his train, which they told him on his arrival at the station, was ready to start. To his surprise, on inquiry, lie was .directed to a cattle train, and indeed discovered, after some time, a passenger car hidden far away amidst the numerous cattle cars. Alter all, the engine does not make any distinction of travelers. It brought to the reverend gentleman's mind what on another occa sion a co-passenger with him on a Texas line told him: "IIere,"he remarked sarcastically, "a fellow gets six months' jail for killing a man: should he happen to steal a cow or a calf, he is hanged." "Perhaps, sai...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

44 This Indian Advocate. I carried out at once, and for that purpose published the fol lowing Motu-Proprio decree. LEO X11I. POPE. There having been made known to us the desire of the government of the French Republic to confide to the J-tenedictine monks of the primitive observance the care of the Sanctuary of Abougosch and the land annexed thereto, situated on the road between Jerusalem and Jaffa, We, considering the not small help the sons of the Patriarch Saint Penedict can bring to the Christians of tie Orient both by ex ample and exercise of the Sacred Functions, and also by the encourage ment of studies according to their Institute, We have come to the determination to authorize, as we do authorize, the Superiors of the Benedictine Congregation of the primitive observance to take posession of the aforesaid Sanctuary of Abougosch and to establish there a com munity of Benedictines, to attend there to the divine service and to promote there the studies and the greatest good pos...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

45 ' AT ST. MARY'S, SACRED HEART, OKXA. TER. The Indian Advocate. " pxECEMBER 27, 1899, two Religious Receptions J land Professions took place in the Convent (5- chapel of the Sisters of Mercy, Sacred Heart, Oklahoma Territory. The former at 4 o'clock p. m. and the latter at 7:30 a. m. Rt. Rev. Abbot Felix De Grasse, O. S. B., presided at both ceremonies. The professed are: Sr. Mary Ignatius, in the world, Miss Caroline Webits; and Sr. Mary Gertrude, formerly known as Miss Katie Malone. The two young ladies admitted into the Novitiate are Miss Josephine Ast, in Religion Sr. Mary Anthony, and Miss Silvie Sullivan, now Sr. Maiy Stanislaus. Occasions such as these, which we are happily often privileged to witness, convinced us of the truth of these words: " 'Tis Heaven alone that is given away, 'Tis only God, may be had for the asking " A Spectator. JOSION, THE MONK OF THE ROSES. T O WARDS the middle of the Twelfth, century, there JLlived, in the Benedictine Abbey of St. Bertin, aj'mon...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

46 The Indian Advocate. dress the assembled brethren at the evening conference. Among other interesting and edifying things, he related, how in Jerusalem, a great number of .the faithful were ac customed to recite frequently five psalms in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, adding a Hail Mary to each of them. These five psalms, each beginning with one of the letters composing the name Maria, were: Magnificat, (i) Ad Dominum cum tribularer, (2) Retribue, (3) In convertendo, (4) Ad te levavi, (5)." Josion was present at the assem bly, and, as he was ever searching for new ways of paying his homage to Mary, he at once resolved to adopt this beautiful practice. He recited those five psalms daily after Iauds, and never was he known to omit them to the last day of his earthly sojourn. How dear to Our Blessed Mother was this devotion in her honor so faithfully practiced by her loving protege, the sequel will show. On the feast of St. Andrew, in the year 1163, the Monks of St. Bertin assembl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

The Indian Advocate. 47 of its inward leaves the name of Mary, written by angelic plume in characters of gold. A rose also bloomed from either eye, and one from either ear. This was indeed a cousoling sight for the inmates of St. Bertin's, and trans ported with reverence and admiration, the brethren, who amidst canticles of joy, carried the remains of their deceased companion to the abbatial church, where they remained for seven days exposed to the veneration of the public. The Abbot of St. Bertin summoned three Bishops, among whom was Dom Andrew, of Arras, .former Abbot of Citeaux, to verify the miraculous event, and altogether praised God "always admirable in His Saints," and the august Mother of God who wished to show to her true and devoted servants that she is never outdone in generosity. Such is the account left us by a pious chronicler of the XlVth. century, John of Ypres, Abbot of the same Monas tery of St. Bertin, an account which he himself has faith fully copied from the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

48 Thk Indian Advocatk. MatinsofthecircumcisionatlLp.nl. followed by midnight Solemn High Mass, Rt. Rev Abbot being the celebrant. The number of com municants was very large, considering the hour and the extremely cold weather. 2. Classes resumed at Sacred Heart College January 3d. Some new students entered after Christmas. All are now earnestly preparing for the terminal examinations to be held during the week preceding Holy Week, viz: from April 1 to April 7, 1900. Results will be pub lished in May number of the Indian Advocate. Easter recess from April 11 to April 17. 3. We had a pleasant call at the Abbey during the past month from Rev. Fathers Bernard, O. S. B., Pastor in Krebs: William, O. S. B., pastor in Purcell; and Ferdinand Schaaf, pastor in Hartshorn, I. T. 4. Very Rev. Dom Leo, O. S. B. prior, and Rev. Dom Gratian, O. S. B., have returned to Sacred Heart. Further will be found a full account of their trip through California, to be continued in next issue. CALENDAR FOR M...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

The Indian Advocate. 49 16. Feast of the Winding Sheet of 0, L. J. C. Double major. 17. St. Patrick. Pontiff-Conf. Double. 18. 3rd Sunday of Lent. 2nd Class. 19. St. Joseph. Double of 1st Class. 20. St. Cyril of Jerusalem. Pontiff-Conf. Doct. Double. 21. St. BENEDICT. Abbot. Double of 1st Class with priv. Oct. 22. Second Day of the Octave. Semi-double. 23. Third " " " " " " 24. Fourth " " " " " " . 25. 4th Sunday of Lent. Annunciation of the B. V. M. Double of 1st Class. 26. Sixth Day of the Octave. Semi-double. 27. Seventh " " " " " " 28. Octave of St. Benedict. Double. 29. St. Gabriel, Archangel. Double major. 30. Feast of the most precious Blood of O. L. J. C. Double major. 31. Feast of the 5 wounds of O. L. J. C. Double major. APRIL. 1. Passion Sunday. 1st Class. 2. St Francis of Paula. Conf. Double. 3. Ferial Office. Semi-double. 4. St. Isidore. Pontiff:Conf. Doct. O. S. B. Double. 5. St. Vincent Ferrer, Confessor. Double. 6. Transfixion of the B. V. M. Double major. 7. Ferial ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

5o The Indian Advocate. ' 15, Easter. 1st Class with priv. Octave. 16. Easter Monday. Double of 1st Class. 17. " Tuesday. " " " " 18. Octave of Easter. Semi-double. ' icj U CC ( C U cc 2Q l Cl " " 2 y u ( ( 11 it " 22. White Sunday. Double. 23. St. George, martyr. Semi-double. 24. St. Mellitus. Ponliff-Confessor. O. S. B. Double. 25. St. Mark. Evangelist. Double of 2nd Class. 26. SSts. Cletus and Marcellinus, Popes and Mart. Semi- double. 27. St. Fidelis of Sigmarengen, Martyr. Double. 28. St. Paul of the Cross. Conf. Double. 29. 2nd Sunday after Easter. St. Robert, Abbot. O. S. B, 30. St. Catherine of Sienna. Virgin. Double. See notice hereafter. MARCH III. ST. ANSELM ABBOT, O. S. B. Cl NSELM, brother-in-law'of Astolphus, King of the rj XLombards, was duke of Frioul, and conspicuous as a leader in the King's army, but became more so in after life by his virtues and noble deeds. He forsook the world in 750 and, through his brother-in-law's munificence, founded the monastery of Fanau...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

Th Indian Adyocatk. 51 ing year this church was solemnly dedicated, by Pope Stephen IV order, by Sergius, Archbishop of Ravenna. Astolphus confirmed this donation by a chart with this condition, however, viz: "That the monks should furnish, him every year forty pikes (fish) for Lent and as many for Advent." The King went to Rome with his brother-in-law, Anselm, and deposited this chart on the tomb of St. Peter t as a mark of submission to the Holy See. Stephen II, on this occasion, invested Anselm with the religious habit, blessed and installed him as Abbot, and recommended him to the Bishops and Archbishops present (this ceremony was performed during a Council then held in Rome). Before his departure to his Abbey, the Pope gave Anselm the relics of St. Sylvester. This holy Abbot founded many hospitals, in one of them he fed 200 poor on the first day of each month. Be sides 300 Masses were said yearly in his monastery, for the living and the dead. He ruled his Abbey of Nonantule for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

52 The Indian Advocate fSfffSBSSBBSSSB of the Life of this great Saint, which shall afterwards be issued in book-form at the low price of 25 cents. We are just publishing a small booklet on Devotion to St. Benedict, to which the Life of St. Benedict and later on, other little works about His Rule and His Order, will be the necessary complement. See the May number. SACRED HEART COLLEGE. ROLL OF HOnOR FOR THE MONTH OF JANUARY, 1900. 1. Edw. Flick. 7. Sydn. Martin. 2. Artli. Grove. 8 Lawr. Mickle. 3. Wm. Hall: 9. Arth. Mohat. 4. Chas. Haster. 10. Henry JNoel. 5. E. Kretchmar. 11. Leo Rodke. (. Geo Lindeman. ' c J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

It te PS NDIAN THE ADVOCATE Vol. XII. May, 1900. No. 3. OKLAHOMA AND INDIAN TERRITORIES. f NDIAN TERRITORY is no longer as described in our I former number. In the middle of the Territory was a country known as Oklahoma or c Beautiful Land" pur chased by the United States in 1866 from the Creeks and Seminoles. It contained less than 3,000,000 acres and com prised the larger portions of what are now the counties of Kingfisher, Canadian, Oklahoma, Logan and Payne. This land was thrown open by proclamation of the President, April ?2, 1889, but a Provisional government was not pro vided until June, 1890. At the same time, the county of Beaver, with an area of 3,681,000 acres situated between parallels 100 f and 103 north latitude, was created out of No Man's Land or Public Lands and attached to Oklahoma, having been sliced off from Texas. Originally what constitutes new Oklahoma and Indian Territories belonged to the French. It was ceded by them to Spain in 1762; afterwards again return...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. into Oklahoma took place in September 1891, when the fertile Iowa, Pottawatomie and Sac and Fox reservations, embracing 1,282,434 acres in the Eastern part of the Ter ritory were absorbed and formed into the counties of Iyin coln and Pottawatomie. The third addition was made in April 1892, compris ing the Cheyenne and Arapahoe lands of 4,297,771 acres, now known as Washita, Roger Mills, Custer, Day, Dewey and Blaine counties. In 1893 came the opening of the Cherokee Outlet, with its 6,014,239 fertile acres. This outlet or strip was origi nally granted to the Cherokee Indians as a hunting ground. Later the Government settled the Osage, Pawnee, Ponca, Otoe, Missouri and Tonkawa Indian tribes on the Eastern part thereof. When the game disappeared, the strip be came a great cattle pasture. Here are found the counties of Woodward, Woods, Grant, Garfield, Noble, Kay and Pawnee. In 1895 the Kickapoo reservation of 206,662 acres, and early in 1896, Greer County, a small...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. h n& The are of the Territory is 38,715 square miles, or about 26,000,000 acres, corresponding in size to the State of Ohio. Oklahoma celebrates its eleventh birthday this year. The first decade is an object lesson as to the rapidity with which the' peaceful evolution of a commonwealth may be effected. No other member of Uncle Sam's big family has grown so fast in so brief a time. The total number of Indians in Oklahoma according to the report of the Governor of Oklahoma is 12,041, a de crease of 993 since last report. These Indians are all un der the care of five Agencies, except 298 Arizona Apaches who are held at Fort Sill as prisoners of war and under di rect control of the War Department. Among these prison ers are a number of noted warriors, chief among whom is Geronimo, now peacefully engaged in agricultural pursuits on land allotted to these prisoners for cultivation near the Fort. The enumeration of the different tribes at the Agen 'cies is as follo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. op o i xs a i& s a a jm j" p . ! q g 0 i i j s Si) 8 Z I ' f ? ft l 4 ' ' S 0 J a 1 . j ' 2 o S C P I n C r o J I no ? S L.". ! . I 21 - i s i : I ks I C z H X ) g bi, o T " s 1 w c 5 y 1- fn w W J w tn ? 2 2 J hJ r-'s jo f -f yr 17 M 3 j ' 4-rn0!2pjj.j J; 1. J rrj I 2 I r I s l -i '-- n : . (go. Cc Xi Lm i jtfL- 3 Sm fo, 1 o I z ! v li XlOBY : w r lg a Is iH Indian Territory has now only an area of 31,400 square miles. It is divided into reservation allotments for the Cherokee, the Chickasaw, the Choctaw, the Creek and the Seminole Nations. Representatives of other and smaller tribes have variously defined reservations, though the larg est tribes, after the Five Civilized Nations above mentioned,

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

Thk Indian Advocate. W ) y have reservations in what has been Oklahoma Territory since 1890. Okmulgee is the capital, of the Creek Nation; Tahlequah, that of the Cherokees; Tuskahoma, of the Choctaws; Tishomingo, of the Chickasaws; Wewoka, of the Seminole Nation, and Muscogee is the chief commercial n,t town of the Indian Territory. The population, a very mix ed one, is, about 500,000, 72,000 Indians. AMERICAN INDIANS. VmERICA having been mistaken for a part of Asia, the abor f I origines were erroneously called Indians by Columbus and qJ J- other early navigators and the name American Indians has been preserved to distinguish the Red or American race, a race as dif ferent from the people of Asia, as the negroes of Africa, the whites of Europe and the Malays of Oceanica. The Indians of the New World m ly be divided into those of South, Central and North America. We are concerned only with the last, and even only with those who occu pied what are now the United States of North Americ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. Let us enter now into a detailed account of the history of these tribes, which, since peace has been secured to them, have acquired a considerable degree of wealth and mental culture TIIE SEMINOLES. The history of the Seminoles begins with their separation from the Creeks of Georgia as early as 1750 the name Seminoles, in Indian dialect meaning wild wanderers or runaways. Seacoffee, their leader, conducted them into the territory of Florida, then under the Spanish colonial policy. There, they sought the protection of Spanish laws, retused in all after times to be represented in Creek councils, elected their own chiefs, and became, in all respects a separate tribe. Their history presents a character, a power and a romance that command respect and an acknowledgement of their superiority. Of the private life of the Seminole less is known, perhaps, than of any other Indian tribe in the United States. His life has been one long struggle for a resting place; he has fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

The Indian Advocate. nental troops would be required to prevent the slaves from deserting their masters." But in that momentous year 1770, Congress had more important duties on hand, and it was not until 1790 that a treaty was entered into between the Creeks and the United States. In the treaty, the Creeks, now at enmity with the Seminoles, agreed to restore the - slaves of the Georgia planters who had taken refuge among them. The Seminoles refused to recognize the treaty they were no longer a 'S t part of the Creeks, they resided in Florida and considered themselves subject only to the crown of Spain. '?? The Creeks now found themselves utterly unable to comply with v ' their treaty. The planters of Georgia began to press the government for the return of their fugitive slaves, wrote to the President advising ; ' that the Georgia people be paid by the government for the loss of their bondmen. The message was tabled, and until 1810 the Seminoles and ' negroes lived in comparative pea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1900

8 The Indian Advocate. Savaga vengeance was now on fire, and "Blount's Fort" became the magnetic warcry of the Seminole chiefs, as they urged their war riors to retaliation. This barbarous sacrifice of innocent women and children conduct ed by a christian (?) nation against a helpless race, and for no other cause than that their ancestors, one hundred years before, were born in slavery, marks a period of cruelty, one of the most wanton in the history of our nation. The inhuman way in which the massacre whs conducted was nev er published at large; nor does the War Department have any record of the taking of Blount's Fort! History, for obvious reasons, does not dwell on the cruel treatment the Indians received from the United States authorities during the Seminole wars, yet pages of our national Library are devoted to the barbarity of the Seminoles. There are two sides to every question, and it is only what the Indian does to the white man that is publish ed, and not what the white ma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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