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Elephind.com contains 8,852 items from Stylus, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 106 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 July 1888

BARKY & BROWN, ERGHAOT JT!AI1I0RS. 69 WASHINGTON STREET, COR. HANOVER STREET, BOSTON. Chemical ami Physical Apparatus, No, 24 WHITEHALL STREET, NEW YORK. A. G. WHITCOMB, SCHOOL CHURCH 'TIP SETTEES FURNITURE. P ~ AND CHAIRS. IHIIIIIIlllllllllll!llllllll!llllllllllllllll!llllllllll!lllllllllll!!lllllllllllllllll!l|; 73 FULTON ST , BOSTON. liefers to REV. \V. 11. DUNCAN, St. Mary's. REV. J. H. GALLAGHER, St. Patrick's.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

The Boston College STYLUS 1893." BOSTON COLLEGE STYLUS Vol. VIJ BOSTON COLLEGE , DECEMBER , 1893. No. i.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AN OLD FRIEND. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

AN OLD FRIEND. Come where the flickering firelight sheds Its shadows as the night hours fly; We'll weave a web from the broken threads Of memories of the days gone by; We'll think of things that ever please The heart that lists for old-time lays; We'll place the Stylus on our knees, And dream the dreams of by-gone days. Where are the bright young wits that met About the board in college times, And sang the thoughts that linger yet Like echoes of the distant chimes Of far off bells? Their forms arise Around me in the still of night, And I catch the gleam of their laughing eyes In the firelight when it gleams most bright. No more their merry footstep falls Upon the playground’s flattened stone; No more they crowd the College halls; The World hath claimed them as its own. But Memory brings them back once more, Like truants to the mother’s knee, And hears the tearful tale they pour In ears that listen lovingly. And who shall write the record down Of all the deeds that they have done? An...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MR. GARNER ON THE SPEECH OF MONKEYS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

MR. GARNER ON THE SPEECH OF MONKEYS. There is a Hindoo legend to the effect that monkeys can speak ; but, that knowing man’s proclivity to get all the work possible out of those capable of speaking, they wisely abstain from exercising their linguistic powers when man is present. Mr. Garner has lately taken on himself the task of extorting from the prudent monkey his secret. He informs us that from boyhood he had always believed that all kinds of animals had some sort of speech by which they can talk among their kind, and that furthermore it has always been a source of wonder to him that man has never learned this language. His own success in the attempts was at first dispiriting. The monkeys, by their quiet dignity of silence, or by a headlong precipitancy of speech, seemed to resent even well-intentioned and scientific intrusion. However, nothing daunted, Mr. Garner armed himself with a phonograph, with nuts and other bon-bons that appeal most strongly to a monkey’s heart, and, in ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MOON ISLAND FABLES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

MOON ISLAND FABLES. I. THE JUG-RAT* AND THE IRREGULAR VERB. One Saturday in early October, about 11.35 A - M -t a Jug-rat and an Irregular Verb were reclining on the sparse grass, which, with little municipal encouragement, was endeavoring to cover the brow of Moon Island. Properly speaking, the Irregular Verb was not reclining. He never had a supine ; or, at least, he lost it by desuetude long before the dawn of history. He was obliged to snatch brief repose in a position, which, they say, is habitual in the smoky wigwams of the noble red-man. Hence the Jug-rat found intercourse constrained and difficult. There had never been between them that frank and easy familiarity that existed between the Jug-rat and other Jug-rats. “By the way,” said the Jug-rat. This was the usual introduction of the Jug-rat. There is leisure and absence of haste in the very sound of the phrase, as there was in the slow, modulated voice of the Jug-rat. “By the way, I suppose everything can’t be explained, t...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
COLLEGE ATHLETICS AND THE COLLEGE CHEERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

COLLEGE ATHLETICS AND THE COLLEGE CHEERS. To determine accurately just what position athletics should occupy in the college curriculum, ever a live issue, has never been more strongly discussed than in the present era of university life. Where they actually do stand and in what regard they are held, have been amply demonstrated in the recent magnificent contests at Hampden Park, the Manhattan Oval, and on Jarvis Field. The peculiar charm of these great battles for triumphs of scholastic muscle lies in the universal admission that the genuine honest contests for honor, without double dealing or imposition, are confined to the college campus. Here, alone, the games of skill and strength retain their original vigor, uncontaminated by the abuses into which they have degenerated in professional circles without. It is no wonder, then, that inter-collegiate meets call forth the applause of the athletic world and the admiration of the layman. What effect college athletics have on the studen...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
COLLEGE JOURNALISM. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

COLLEGE JOURNALISM. The newspaper of to-day is one of the most important factors of our civilization. It professes to be the voice of the people, and is the medium through which the ideas of the leading men of the time are given to the public. The multitude cannot govern itself with success ; and, feeling its impotence, turns for guidance to individual men recognized as leaders. Hence, the newspaper plays a part, and a very important part, in the forming of the moral and intellectual character of the people. To it thousands look, not only for ideas in regard to political, social and intellectual affairs, but also for views respecting spiritual matters. If the editor of a newspaper proves himself a man of thought, character and good sense, his paper becomes the standard of many in the community, and he literally moulds the minds and forms the opinions of a large number of readers. So it is, that we find many in our day who hold this or that opinion on a certain subject simply because...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THWARTED AMBITION. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

THWARTED AMBITION. A song on Spring I fain would write. All poets sing A song on Spring; But, strangest thing! My Muse takes flight, When songs on Spring I fain would write. F. ’pj.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A CHILD IS BORN [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

A CHILD IS BORN to us, and a son is given to us, and the government is upon his shouldersand his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, God the Mighty, Father of the World to come, the Prince of Peace. Isaias, ix., (J. Behold , I bring you good tidings of great joy , that shall be to all the people : for this day is born to you a Saviour , vjho is Christ the Lord. Luke, ii., 10.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE PRINCE OF PEACE IS BORN. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

THE PRINCE OF PEACE IS BORN. I. Deep gloom and darkness over time Were brooding, heaven’s gates sublime Were locked and barred, Creation’s plan was marred By stain of Parents’ crime; When lo ! a seer’s prophetic ken Reveals these tidings unto men ; “ A child at length “ Shall come with love and strength “ To ope the gates again.” II. In eastern land, long years agone, While stars in azure brightly shone With kindly light One mystic, wintry night, Some peaceful shepherds watched —anon Their ears are filled with marvellous song, And radiant spirits throng on throng Appearing sing This new, this wondrous thing — <• The Prince of Peace shall right all wrong. “ In swaddling clothes — behold the sign — “ Enwrapped he lies'near sleeping kine “ In cavern dim. “ Arise, go worship Him, “ Immanuel, the child Divine.” O God ! in Bethlehem’s cave forlorn, Where royal trappings nought adorn. In manger’s straw The wondering shepherds saw A babe, the Prince of Peace new-born. III. The Lo...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CHRISTMAS AS CONCEIVED IN SONG. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

CHRISTMAS AS CONCEIVED IN SONG. Of the many beautiful customs of Christmas-tide that touch the human heart so nearly, there has been none more popular than that of the singing of Christmas carols. These [ simple melodies, in perfect harmony with the Saviour’s birth, mingle so sweetly the Christian spirit of gratitude and devotion with a little worldly yet harmless joy, that all men love them and rejoice at their sound. Many are the poets who have given us their most tender, graceful, and inspiring thoughts in speaking of this glad season, and many is the heart that is stirred by the simple strain to cast aside, perhaps, a trial or tribulation long endured. It is true, indeed, that the poet has taken his most beautiful and sublimest thoughts from the sacred element of this holy season, yet has he interwoven a certain worldly pomp and splendor that draws us nearer to his theme. “ Tuning his lyre,” as a modern writer says, 41 to celebrate that rare and joyful feast, that night wherein ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Boston College Stylus. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

Boston College Stylus. PUBLISHED MONTHL Y. Terms of Subscription: One Dollar in advance, post-paid. Single copies, fifteen cents. Advertising Rates: Address, Henry P. Casey, Advertising Agent, Boston College. The Stylus is published by the students of Boston College as an aid to their literary improvement. As the paper is, for the most part, devoted to matters which may not prove interesting to the general reader, it must look for its support, chiefly to the students and graduates and their friends. These, we trust, will need no exhortation to extend to us their patronage. Address, BOSTON COLLEGE STYLUS, 761 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Mast. EDITORS: Editor-In-Chief, James A. Dorsey, ’94. Albert E. Macdonald, ’94. Francis H. Houston, ’94. William L. Sullivan, ’95. Charles J. Martell, ’96. Thomas J. Young, '97. Business Manager : Martin A. Foley, ’96. Assists. : Stephen A. Bergin, ’96. Timothy J. Collins,’ 95. Press of James L. Cork & Co., 256 Washington Street. DECEMBER, 18...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EDITORIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

EDITORIAL. Why, some critic may ask, has the Stylus arisen from its long slumbers to tempt the uncertain, to dim, perhaps, the lustre of its former glory? Why, we ask in return, did the river Arethusa, after its descent into darkness, come again into | the glad sunshine? The impetuous spirit of youth wants an outlet under clear skies and cheering sunshine. We have kept the Pythagorean precept of silence for five years more than some of our contemporaries have done. But we felt all the while the sunlight of former successes luring us to the surface again. Huck Finn tells us that the adventures of Tom Sawyer down the river “ only just pi’sened him for more.” Besides, carping critic, if you really exist there is the venerable Phoenix. It is true, his feathers have long since been worn off, or frayed at least, by constant attrition at the hands of generations of school-boys. It may not be quite proper to present him even to a carping critic in his present disreputable want of covering. ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
STYLUS PRIZE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

STYLUS PRIZE. Just as we go to press. Rev. T. J. Holland, ’B4, offers a purse of twenty-five dollars for the best prose essay, contributed to the Stylus before May 1, 1894.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOMI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

DOMI. AT SPRINGFIELD. “Oh, Will! ” she cried, A girlish frown on her classic brow, “ Why do they run, what means that row?” And Will replied, “ My dearest Lou,” he knew it all “ The boys are simply 1 after the ball.’ ” There is a very exciting contest for first honors in the Senior class of the English Department. The Boston Herald says; “ The New York World figures it out that not less than $lO,OOO changed hands on the foot ball game.’' We have heard of a young man asking for a hand and getting a foot , but not when there was $lO,OOO in question. Bishop Doane says: “State money cannot be used to support any denominational school, because it cannot be used to further the interest of any religious body.” A fictitious Frenchman once said that opium caused drowsiness on account of its soporific qualities. There is a much-talked-of coming Latin play to be given by the Hasty Pudding Club of Harvard in the near future. This is the first attempt which the University across the Charles has ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ALUMNI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

ALUMNI. The Stylus is glad to note that the Alumni Association has been growing stronger every year, and that its annual meetings are deservedly becoming more and more popular on account account of the spirit of good fellowship which reigns over the festive board and the ever increasing excellence of the after-dinner exercises. We are told that the last banquet was the most successful of all both in point of numbers and in the unusual merit of the speech-making. It took place in the Hotel Thorndike, on Monday Evening, June 19. Fathers Devitt, McGurk, Buckley and Brosnahan, were the guests of the Society. Timothy W. Coakley, ’B4, ruled over the festivities as toastmaster, and by the keenness of his wit and the elegance of his diction set a standard much above the ordinary. The other speakers were not to be outdone, however ; inspired by his leadership they treated their subjects in a most entertaining manner. Although brimful of humor, their remarks at the same time contained much th...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLASS NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

CLASS NEWS. The Class of Philosophy numbers twenty-two. Jas. A. Dorsey is Class-President; Rich. A. Smith, Vice-President; F. X. Crawford, Secretary; Jno. J. Flood, Treasurer; and John J. Burke is Beadle. The specimen in Dialectics was held on Wednesday, November 8, in presence of Rev. Father Rector, some members of the Faculty, and the class of Rhetoric. The Rhetoricians have elected the following class officers : Martin A. Foley, President; John J. Mitchell, Vice-President; John J. Nugent, Secretary ; and Lawrence A. Brock, Treasurer. The Class of Humanities exactlydoubles the Philosophers in numbers. They gave a speciman on the Ars Poetica , on Monday, November 20. Charles J. Martell read a sonnet on Horace, and John J. McCarthy, an essay on the A?s Poetica. Stephen A. Bergin is Class-President. The P'irst Grammarians have elected the following officers of their class association: William M. Stinson. President; Joseph Rogers, Vice-President; J. T. McEleney, Secretary; J. Sullivan...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

The names of the following students, who obtained over 95 per cent in all of their classes, were placed on the Roll of Honor: David Regan, Francis McGee, John Kirby, Leo O’Neill, Henry Brock, Dennis Brown, Benjamin Teeling, George McLaughlin, Cornelius Murphy, Richard Splaine, Jones Corrigan, William Crowley, Eugene Feeley, Arthur Fogarty, John Bolster, Timothy Shanahan.

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ATHLETIC NOTES [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

ATHLETIC NOTES B. C. A. A. President, M. VV. White, ’94; Vice-Presi-dent, F. A. Brick, ’96; Treasurer, M. F. Maguire, ’96; Secretary, H. J. Mahoney,’96 ; Censor, J. H. Devlin, 97; Executive Committee, W. H. Walsh, ’96, Chairman, S. A. Bergin, ’96, J. A. Dorsey, ’94. Manager B. B. C., A. E. Macdonald, ’94; Captain B. B. C., F. X. Crawford, ’94. Manager* F. B. E., J. W. Hart, Jr., ’96; Captain* F. B. E., B. F. Wefers, ’97. Our foot-ball team played Boston University, Thursday, November 30, and defeated them without much trouble. On the University eleven were three “ Tech” men and three from Harvard. After some minutes spent in fruitlessly objecting to the playing of these six, the two elevens lined up in the middle of the field with B. C. in possession of the ball. A flying wedge gained eight yards for B. C. The ball was then lost through a fumble. B. U. gained fifteen yards on a clever rush by Sherman, but were held there, and forced to kick on a third down. The B. C. men then attemp...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SOCIETIES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 December 1893

SOCIETIES. The twenty-sixth year of the Fulton Debating Society opened auspiciously. Mr. Quinn, the able successor ot Mr. Mullan, in his introductory remarks urged the members to cooperate with him in carrying on the work of the Society. He said, among other things, that he took charge of the Society, not entirely unacquainted with it. Unlike many college associations its fame was not confined to the building in which it met; the name the Society had adopted made it known wherever a Jesuit College had been established in the country. As usual at the opening of the year there was a long list of applicants for admission. The limit of fifty members, which the Constitutions determine, precluded many from joining. The first preliminary debate of the year was held in the Young Men’s Lyceum, November 17. The question was: “ Resolved, that it would be incompatible with the best interest of England to abolish the House of Lords.” The affirmative was debated by F. H. Houston, ’94, negative by...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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