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Elephind.com contains 2,951 items from Wide West, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,951 results
WILL WINKLE'S NUGGET. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

WILL WINKLE'S NUGGET. Yes, there it was! There could be no mistake about it Just as he was about to throw dovwi his pick and abandon the hole. Will Winkle found his nugget. After six months unprofitable labor m that claim, he had struck a lead at last. Hurrah! his luck had turned. And as the news spread wide and far that he, whose name had been a synonym for bad luck during many n long month hud found v nuge-et, the miners crowded in l i see tie- wonder Mud-colored Mexicans, swarthy Spaniards, clmnsv Chinese and chattering Chilcnos came in throngs. A proud man was Will Winkle that day. Not another stroke of work would he do till the lump was a >ld. He liad worked 1. i,g enough. To-day should be devoted to enjoyment. Hang up the pick und the shovel. Let the torn rest for to-day. And while his partner takes the lump to the nearest banker to sell it, he will devote himself to the entertainment of his tricmU and his own relaxation. A man who wishes to have a '■tune" m the min...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A NIGHT ON A DAM. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

A NIGHT ON A DAM. All was still. Not a soul was stirring among the thirty miners that su lately were gathered uround the camp-fire, whose ruddy glow aud cheerful aspect had subsided into a few gray cinders, aud it was only when an occasional gust swept fitfully over the ashes tlut a momentary glow told of their recent brightness. Around the dying lire were stretched a party of miners in their blankets, whose deep breathing was the only sound that broke the solemn stillness of the night. I, as sound asleep as the rest, was dreaming that I was working in a hole half full of water, and that a two-pound nugget had just slipped from my shovel into the water, when I was awakened by a cold hand being laid on my brow, and drop after drop of water falling on my face. Suddenly jumping up, all in a tremor from fright, I was not much re-assured by the appearance of the individual who stood before me. Pale and shivering, the water dripping from the long hair that hung around his ghastly face, no...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MY PROSPECTING TOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

MY PROSPECTING TOUR. In the summer of 'b*> I was working, with two partners, h claim on the North Fork, of the American River. Our lead, which had been a pretty go.nl otic, was running out, and we had for some tune been discussing the propriety of leaving it and going " prospecting." This movement I had opposed f T some time, thinking that, as long as we could do reasonable well where we were, it would be bad policy to leave our claim and n>um over the country iv search of better diggings. One evening, however, when the results of our united day's labor wen' declared to be five dollars, I came to the conclusion that perhaps we could not do better than make a little trip in the neigh- i borhood for the purpose of prospecting. So, after a little tfMMMtriOB, as, of course, it would not do for me to come round too suddenly, |it was decided that we should try the experiment the next morning. The morning dawned, and after stowing away our surplus possessions in the t...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Drops of Dunch. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Drops of Dunch. A SAFE SrBCL LATIOX. Since that stupendous work, the L'rvstul Palace nt Syd euhani, has been executed by a private Company, the idn naturally presents itself that the same agency that ha mired such a trophy uf peace might be employed for th purpose of effecting, as speedily and as thoroughly, a tri umph of war. An asMtciatiou might be got up whiel should cotitract with Government, for a certain sum, t< put down the Emperor ol" Russia ; aud if this project wen adopted there can be little doubt that the tiling would b done ; the Russians driven back; peace .irmly established and Nicholas abolished, in a very much shorter time thai any one of these objects is likely to be accomplished b' the present, or any other i'abinei LARCENISTS AND FELON ISTS. In the debate on the prison estimates, Lord ralmerstoi is reported to have stated that '* Upon the admission of convicts, they declare the reli gion to which they belong." About the religion of a convict we should ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Know Nothings. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

The Know Nothings. Dr. Duff, who has recently made a tour of the Uuite States, m a lecture delivered' after his return to Englanc thus notices the Know Nothings: " y>' I ma .V mention, in passing, as a singular cha acteristic of America, that in New V ork there has sprun up a new sect lately. It calls itself the ' Know Nothings What the whole of their object may be, nobody we knows ; but the result of their establishment proves thi: that this class arc striving v cry much to counteract th insidious underworking of Popery. (Hear, hear.) An they show it in many ways. They go quietly to the ele< tious—nobody knows about them ; and of late it has bee found that no man under Popish influence is getting int power and authority. Not long ago, | just to show th working of the thing,) a man in New York began t preach openly in the streets and elsewhere against ih< Papacy, and some of the Papists, just as in Ireland am other pi sees, began to hoot and pelt the...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TUNNELING. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

TUNNELING. One afternoon in the stlminer of '52, as I was carrying up a bucket of water from the river to our tent at the top of the bank, my foot caught on a large stone, and my perI pendicular was at once changed to a horizontal posture, j while the water from the overturned bucket spread itself iin various directions. With a tew expletives of rather forcible character, I raised myself to my feet again, and, picking up my bucket, was about to retrace my steps to the river, when my attention was attracted by a folded letter which had been placed under the stone that had | caused my fall. When my foot tripped, it had overturned j the stone, and the letter lay exposed to view. Bending ! over, I p eked it up, anil proceeded to examine it. It was : written in pencil, and the characters were very irregular anil stiffly formed, as if made by a person with a wounded hand. The contents were as follows: " If this letter should fall into the hands of any person, I wish to inform them that I ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Characters. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

California Characters.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE UNSUCCESSFUL MINER. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE UNSUCCESSFUL MINER. It is the firm, unalterable conviction of the Unsuccessful Miner that " California is a humbug I" He bkMN it to be so. Where are the big lumps that only needed labor to accomplish their transportation from the " pockets' l (if the mines to the pockets of the miners f Where are the golden sands that might have been seen at the bottom of the livers, from the b mis that skimmed their surface? Where is the '• GoM washing iv the streets of San Francisco," with which the uewapepera teemed ; and where the famous " Gold Mountain near Los Angeles, ",w-hich he sus-iecta- to have been a Kiell invention wihw than a real mountain ? Where is the ounce u-day that " any man who works can make?" Where is Gold Bluff; Gold Lake? In a word, where ake pood diggins?" It is his opinion that the journals of California publish these stories i originated, he thinks, by contiguous storekeepers) for the purpose of inducing immigration, and thereby increasing the population mi whose supp...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE SUCCESSFUL MINER. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE SUCCESSFUL MINER. The Successful Miner believes that he could go into the mines now, and do as well as he did in "4ti. The idea* that the mines are worked out, is all stuff. That success in the mines is dependent to tiny great extent on Luck he does not believe. His own gotd fortune he attributes to innate force of character. Believes that he would have got along anywhere; and thinks that anybody who work* in the mines can do well. Thinks California is the only place in the world for a working man to live in. Intends b 1 bring his family out. Believes, in fact, everything in relation to California that the Unsuccessful Miner disbelieves. Is confident that the story which states that a miner on a prospecting tour once tied his horse to a tree at night, and went to sleep in his blankets, and, on waking in the morning, found that his horse had pawed down into • good diggings," from which the miner eventually t-wk out his " pile," is true, every word of it He has known miners to wor...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LA SENORITA. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

LA SENORITA. The theme of poets, North and South, whether her dark eyes glisten through the veil of silken lashes that droop responsive to the ardent glances of a Spanish swain, or light up with the fire kindled by the tones of the national guitar; whether her long, luxuriant locks stray wildly in the breeze that rushes from the sea over the plains of California, or tie in silky slumber, tracing waves of glossy darkness on her olive-tinted brow, in the Btreets of (iuadalajara; whether with carefully poised vessel on her queenly head, she treads the grassy mead with form erect and springy movement, each step swelling a taper ankle and curving a classic instep, such as seldom visit the chill climes of the North, or with relxm gracefully disposed she promenades the Alameda with a high bred grace the more charming that it is unaffected. The heart of a Senorita is as warm as the sun that smiles on her country; ber imagination as vivid and productive as the flowers and fruits that spring ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE GENTLEMAN FROM PIKE. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE GENTLEMAN FROM PIKE. Statis and particular districts in the Union have long been remarkable lor some pevuhur characteristics that attach themselves to the inhabitants, und which, carried into remote sociions of the country, render thctr owners the Mlbji-e'ts of remark and ridicule. Thus a Va: k. ■ * proverbial in many localities for shrewdness ntnl a peculiarly piwerful grasp of the circulating im-dinm, when once thut requisite is in his possession; and exp. 11 n di\ iduuls hale even p-ue s,. far as to designate, by the modifications of Ihese idiosyncrasies, the particular State t.. which the individual iv ipiestiou esses, his eativity. Hut never, we ln-bcvr. till the California enugmtioti, has a county assumed the proud position of endowing her citizens with such infallible evnlences of their nativity, that they may lie recognized lis her sons in fir distant chines, which till their arrival were ignorant of her existence, o Tike," in Culifoniia, represents a locality as distinc...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE FLOWER SELLERS [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE FLOWER SELLERS Peddlers, the world over, make it a poing to approach as near ubiquity in their mercantile existence as possible. Particularly is this the case with the Flower Sellers in this city. With all the sang froid the French nation, whose natives monopolize the business. they throng the Cafes and the streets, insisting that their flowers shall find purchasers. Have Jones und yourself just sat down to dine at the Cafe du Commerce (an extravagance you are not often guilty of, but in this case a propitiary offering preparatory to asking said Jones to affix his autograph to the reverse side of a document that already bears your own)? Just as you had fairly opened the subject, up comes a bunch of flowers under your nose, interrupting the passage of a choice piece of boeuf a la mode, poised on your fork, and for whose reception you had just opened your mouth. " Bonjour Monsieur," sighs a sweet voice at your elbow. You are about to swear, but refrain after looking at the speaker...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE RANCHERO. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE RANCHERO. The Arab if tin* well j with a garden to roam over, in lieu of a de*crt; mounting a steed of purest blood, whose j spirit aud power of endurance add new laurels to its nice; the Ranchero realizes the fable of the Centaur. With his I gay tritrtijx floating in the breeze; his conical glazed hut M Jnuatl.v on a ~.;M->Lapcd head, covered with luxuriant i curly huir; his gruceful > ..t. , /t. f<>n with its buttons of silver; and the tine-plaited carrtitu beneath ; his /'-'■.• of velvet, slashed at the sides, and open below the knees, disI playing the snow-white cu'z'-n*s: mounted on a splendid I saddle, with his ritttii looped gracefully over the jxtnimel, ' be is equally ready fer display or duty ; a tight or a fandang.' Thus attired. \v is the object of envy to the men, of admiration to the women. With all the boldness of spirit of the mountaineer, he prefers to urge his charger over the plain*, rtlher than endure the pedestrian...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemical Analysis OF THE WATER OF NEW ALMADEN SPRINGS, BY THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Chemical Analysis OF THE WATER OF NEW ALMADEN SPRINGS, BY THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY. This select body of eminent Pathologians assembled on Sunday evening, according to notification, at their Chemi-co-laboritorial vaults, for the purpose of analysing, and testing the medical properties of the above uumcd valuable water, and comparing it with that of other celebrated Springs. The Society was called to order by the President, with the accustomed invocation to Bachus, to which the menihsM gave audible gustatory responsives. Afterwards, with his usual inclination to the upright, he proceeded to state the general objects of the Society, and the special intention of the evening's convocation, as follows: Gentlemen : -Since your elective fruuehisc first recognized iv sat the taste and ability to preside over your deliberations, I have never before' been called upon to present you with a subject so foreign to my qualifications, and. judging from my joist experience and limited powers of obser...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
When Newspapers Please. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

When Newspapers Please. The London Leader— one <>f the most piquant journals that reach us from across the great " herring pond —thus felicitously explains the secret of newspaper popularity : " It may be very wi»e to see both sides of a question and to be less anxious about what can be said for you; but the fact is, that the object of most men in buying a newspaper is to enjoy the statement of their own inarticulate notious in the 'shape of artistical development and expression. A reader never so thoroughly enjoys a paper as when he can say, ' That is exactly what 1 have said myself;' and he always tries to buy that paper which can give to his own opinions an air of the greatest point and wisdom. It is looking into a mirror which tells him, not the superficial aspect, so inadequate to the expression of his real beauty and dignity, but that inner truth which is a more perfect portrait of the whole man; a mirror which makes Simpson sec with his own eyes the Socr...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE DIGGER INDIAN. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

THE DIGGER INDIAN. A person accustomed to such delineations of the character of the " uoble savage" as are found in Metam<>ra and the History of King Philip, might be slightly disappointed by his actual experience of the Digger. Personal beauty is not one of the Digger's characteristics, and for bravery and nobility of character and bearing he is not remarkable. Coarse features, black matted hair, a clumsy form, and an abundant accompaniment of dirt, make up the total of his physical attributes. In dress be is not particular—any kind will do. Wearing apparel is yet considered an innovation, and its use has become by no | means universal. When, however, a Digger Indian is induced to adapt himself to the use of this concomitant of civilized life, he insists on indulging in it to the fullest possible extent. Thus, if cue of our heroes becomes possessed of enough clothing to be termed by theatrical courtesy a " wardrobe," he never for a moment parts wth it, but wea...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PUBLIC SCHOOL FESTIVAL. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

PUBLIC SCHOOL FESTIVAL. The celcbratiou of the Public Schools in San Francisco, of which the above is an accurate view, took place on the evening of April 29tb, at Musical Hall, in Bush Street.— The ceremonies were very interesting, over twelve hun- dred persons being in attendance, full half of whom were children. No gladder sight could be witnessed by the wanderer from home and family, or by those whose dear ones were among the happy throng, than the joyous faces of these little innocents, as they frolicked around the May-pole, and vied with each other in their enjoyment of the recreation the occasion offered.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sports of the Surf. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Sports of the Surf. A lady correspondent of the Washington Union, who has been " going down to the sea" at Cape Island, gives the following description of the aquatic enjoyments of the place: v The attendant upon the bath was taking a prominent part in the conversation, as usual, while immediately behind her crouched her daughter, a negro girl of twelve or thirteen years of age, laughing, and rolling the whites of her eyes in extasy at all that was going forward. Beside a large tub of waiter in the centre of the floor, knelt or sat several ladies just from the surf, in all the various stages of disrobing, each intent upon her own arrangement, and utterly regardless of what was passing around her.— Others were preparing for the bath, laving aside their dresses, or rather suffering them to be laid aside for them by their maids; while the latest comers were removing tlieir shawls and bonnets, and exchanging greetings with iheir acquaintances. For the first few moments we were deafened ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
WRECK OF THE CLIPPER SHIP GOLDEN FLEECE. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

WRECK OF THE CLIPPER SHIP GOLDEN FLEECE. The clipper ship Golden Fleece struck a rock near Fort Point at the entrance of the harbor of San Francisco, on the afternoon of April 22d, and in a few days went to pieces. Soon after the disaster, the wreck was sold for $2600. She was bound to Manila, and was a new vessel. Various reasons were assigned for the dis- aster; but it was probably owing to the Iee-mainbraces having been let go before the order was given, causing the ship to miss stays.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hew a Fellow brought in the Returns. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 1 December 1854

Hew a Fellow brought in the Returns. In a county near by, an election was held lor the (ffioe of High Sheriff. Tfiree popular candidatis were in the field, and their chance of success were about equal. Never, it is said, did the yeomanry of that county enter more boldly into a political contest than on thia occasion. Thousands'upon thousands of dollars hud been staked upon the result, aud this ci rcunis tancc, pel hups, lent much to the enthusiasm manifested by the people. On the morning of the election, runners provided with fleet horses, were dispatched to all the different polls of the county, who were to bring in the returns to the county seat—a hotel which was the head quarters of the three parties. We will pass over the many exciting and amusing occurrences of the day, and recur to the closing scene of the night. The returns were all in, with the exception of one township, and the contest thus far so close, the disparity between the highest and lowest candidates was less lliai...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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