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Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 11,830 items from Brunswick & Coburg Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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No Damage Done. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

No Damage Done. In a Tennessee backwoods lived a farmer who, although hlie had never seen a railroad, yet had his opinion of them and the mischief which he understood they might cause. Ac cording to his notion a train was as much to be dreaded as a cyclone itself. Great, then, was his consterna tion upon learning that a right of way for a railroadl was wanted through his farm. He swore " by hickory" that no money could buy it. Finally, land enough for the purpose was secured and the road built. The day the lirst train -was to pass,: the neighbours. knowing of t he old fellow's opposition, persuaded him, neverthele.s. to go with them to see it. As the train disappear ed someone said: "You see, Bill, it didn't hurt ann thing, after all." 1ill was surprised, but hated to abandon his contention that a train would ruin things. "Wal, yaas," he said: "I reckon that ye mIought say so, but. ye see. the gosh-dlurned thing come thrum here endw?lys. .Ef it. het come side ways "it would ha' bust...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why Some Dreams are Really Healthy. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Why Some Dreams are Really Healthy. - 4------ IFreud, tile great German neuro logist, who has put our dreamns to a scientific test and told us the mean ing of thiem, (de, ares that our cus Lonliry phrase of "Good-night, andt pleasant dlreams" hans a deeper sig niincanice than most of us realise. lie says that in wishing a friend plea sant dreams we are wishing himn good health, for certain dreams are healthy. A sleep with pleasant dreams is more beneficial, according to Freudl, than a dreamless sleep. Of course, a sleep with bad dreams, nightmares, and the like is by no means restful, or healthful, but a night of fairly . good slumber, interspersed with a few dreams of a decidedly pleasant nature is really restful and, being extremely restful, is heathful. Nearly every one, according'to this authority, feels rather tdull upon awakening front a solid, dreamnless sleep, aind frequently is so dull he does inot feel dlisplosed to performii his usual good dlay's work, ibut to a waken aft...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CLEAN OUT THE MENTAL COBWEBS. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

CLEAN OUT THE MENTAL COB WEBS. Sam Walter Foss uses rhyme. to read farmers a very useful lesson, and one that should be heeded more than it is-: .. "Yes, clean yer house, and clean yer shed, And clean yer barn in ev'ry part: But brush the cobwebs from yer head, And sweep the snowbanks from yer heart. Yes, when spring cleanin' comes around Bring forth the duster and the broom, But rake yer foggy notions down, And sweep yer dusty soul of gloom." "Hoard's Dairymanl" In Italy marriage brokers are a regular institution. They have' poc ket-books filled with the names of marriageable maidens in various ranks of life, and go about trying to arrange matches. When they are suc cessful they receive a commission, and very likely something extra as a voluntary gift from their customer, One advantage of being a farmer is that it enables one to wear his old clothes without feeling ashamed of himself.--Florida Times-Union. Poultry Note :--Don't hang on to the old hens; get rid of them. Near the doo...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Famous Fashions from Mistakes. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Famous Fashions from Mistakes. One of the Kings of France came to the throne a child of ten; he wore his hair in long ringlets all about his head. ninmmediately the men and i women of the Court did likewise, and 'it becamei thle natio)n i ide craze. This semie monoarch was bald at .thirty, and, heing a lover .of thing"s bgatutifil and feminine, or idered he labl,,rate "xig which was lakien up and revelled in during ma ox reigns. The feather boa oricinated less than twenty year. ago in conser vative Ilosto n. In an idle moment an apprentice in a milliner's shop sewedl the discarded bits and ends lof poor ptlllliles tgell her, and strung thrint abu ti her neck. The other girls lauighest ait the trimniig the head of tho lepart ment declared tient pre' t . am1 the oriler was gixin that no cait-. ys in the forii <of lbnes I,- throin in the waste balPki'. All tI rts ,f the plumes Iwere kelt, sewed ol to ;a ribbiton, oAtl the ,itire r!thing curlel. long rihibon loot s ie-ing liu...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CZAR'S FIRST RIDE IN LIFT. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

iThe Czar ulsed a lift for the firstl time in his life while he was in Ber lin for the wedding festivities. iHe called at one of the leading hotels on the day of his arrival to con gratulate Prince and Princess Hlenryv of Prussia on their silver-wedding anniversary. King George and Queen Mary arrived at the hotel at the same time. After being greeted by Prince Henry in the hoiol'lobby, the Czar was shown to the lift in order to reach the State apart ments on the first floor. IHe hesi tated for a nionicnt, and then, after King George and Queen Mary ton tered, he followed *thenlm. .The Czar expressed great satisfaction with this mode of asceut, and asked Induy questions about the lift. No lifts are allowced in any of the Tm peli i. phlaces in liussia, owing to the fear of an\ Anarchist plot. A. newly-mRarried pair had escaped frbom their demonstrative friends and were on the way to the statiou when the carriage stopped. The bridegroomn looked out of the win dow impatiently. . "What's ...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Good Test. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

A Good Test. l)oi Pe[dro. who was for so mnany years lmperor of Brazil, once gave audienlce to ta youn enOgicneer, who, game to - show himll a new .ap pliance for stopping railway en gines. The Emperor Was pleased nith the ilea. "The day after to-morrow," said lie. "have your engine ready. \e will have it coupled to my saloon carriage and start. When going at full speed I will give the signal to stop, and then we shal see how yolr ilCivention \works." At the appointed tine lDoln t'idro entcered his canrriage, the young in enitor min ited hlis engine, anil theln on they slxI for several u~iles. There came no signal, and the endi ncer began to fear that the Em peror had fallen asleep. Shiden1ty the engine came to a shlrlu culrve roundl the edge of a cliP. when, to his horrnr. on the track directly aheadi of themt tlm en gineer saw a huge boontler. Ile hadt jIust sull'cient presence of mind to tuliii the crunk of the brake, and pull the engine up within a coiupile of yarlds of tihe fat...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. SUB-SOILING WITH EXPLOSIVES. SOME PRACTICAL HINTS ON THEIR USE. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

S THE FARM. SUB-SOILING WITH EXPLOSIVC'FS. SOME PRACTICAL HINTS ON THEIR USE. It is well to realise that land is bought or leased according to its surface measurement, . and if we can succeed in making the under-soils contribute a share towards the pro duction of better crops, we are add ing to the producing area of our farms in the most economical way possible. Land is getting very dear on the surface, and to get the best possible returns per acre we must, on all our stiffer soils or those! un derlaid by "hard-pan." break up the sub-soils to allow the roots of the plants a full range for root growth. Farming by dynamite has caught on in the United States, and is spread ing throughout Canada and Mexico like a prairie fire. It seems a strange way of making the ground bring forth its produce in plenty, but there is no getting away from the fact that it acts. Doubtless the man who tried the trick first and met with success was quite in the dark as to why it suc ceeded. It is a moot poi...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CROP ROTATION OF PERMANENT BENEFIT. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

CROP ROTATION OF PERMANENT BENEFIT. R. C. Doneghue, Prof. of Agronomy, North Dakota Agricultural College. While all the causes of low yields of the small grains cannot be remov ed, practically all that are of imme diate importance can be -controlled in large measure by a well-planned system of crop rotation. When crops are grown in rotation and proper tillage methods are followed, they will suffer less from dry weather than when they are grown continuously. Crop rotation is usually of more im portance than the methods of tillage used in this respect, although both are important. In most rotations more roughage is produced than can be disposed of by the work stock on the farm. Hence, more animals must be kept and more manure produced to return to the land to keep up the supply of organic matter. The organ ic matter in the soil may also be maintained by growing grasses and legumes, (clover, lucerne, peas), in the rotation. Inasmuch as not enough. manure can be produced on a farm to ke...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. A BAFFLED IMPOSTOR, OR, THE HEIR TO A DUKEDON: A HUGE PERSONATION FRAUD. PART 8. CHAPTER XI. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

ALL RIGHTS RESERVEM). A Bi.P r- MaLr z DRy L L, t' - 1 OR.-- . THE HEIR TO A DUKEDOM : A HUGE PERSONATION FRAUD. By S. W. Hopkins, Author of "On Four Brass Plates," etc., etc. PART S. CHAPTER XI. Lord Chester, formerly known as Gerald Lovering, and 'once an inmate for thirty days of .the New York Penitefitiary under the name of renry Barnes, lounged in his luxuri ous rooms in the Albany, listlessly trying to -pass a rainy afternoor without the bother of going out ir the storm.. It was weary work, foi Lord Chester missed 'the companion ship that makes a rainy day often the most enjoyable to a man whc reads. Lord Chester knew nothing of books. He cared nothing' for them. Give him the real thing-life in all its rosy voluptuousness ; the club. the .drive,. the gaming table, or the sweet hour with some temporary charmer. These . were the elements that made Lord Chester's life a merry ..one;, made it worth living, in fact. 'Can't. stand it :much longer," he said to himself. "Wonder if Bra...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sunday Observance in Germany. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Sunday Observance in Germany. In termin i, iuiniu is not a day - 1(t1 'CiOt , trn.l, attrl.th i elit . sport, and t heattr t-goitng. Take. for in Atnnce, the olenirt, of shops on Sunday. A\t the present time shops mlay he oleieclt froml eibht till ten on Stn ilax . orni ais and from twelve tillt wo. The- muust-he shut irolr ten till itnaeitx.e, as these aIre the hours of ii'ie. ' s-oi ice. They imist he shut a ftt'e t v , si that em ploees Itiiav ha\e on!e afternlion a week foit rest. It is !liow pro posed to perItlil Sunly <Ia ,Peiiner only froti S till Ii am:., thus len, then ing the free time of shopi assist A-\1 cafs, resta uant-at b1eerhoeuses. ette. l a? lie opten all all an.id alt niight . You utat inr t hay a pair of 1oot s e Oxtept lt w?en oi t'ht arutd ten., tilt ,i wl 'tux i as micth leer as to, like stl einu ysc ir-self with in tie walls of a p' lic-- 'us even' ihen tIhe churcth ell- are tcaliing you to soern ite. At tie I,'eseitt ne ti nl!a" buty a ,utinlty i...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Customs in Regard to Bowing. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Customs in Regard to Bowing. -----+---- (By Mrs. FRANK LEAIINEIID.) One of the tests of good breeding, training, and culture is in the matn ner in which a bow or salutation of recognition is made. A brusque, abrupt mannier is rude. A very effusive mlannler and a low bow are worse. TFhe correct salutation is between the two extremes. Although according to circumstan ces, a how may be cordial, frichd ly, formal. slight, tldeferential or familiar. it muust be nlrde. A person who has bIeen introduced is entitled to recognition. An important rule about bowing is that a man must wait for a lady to recognise him. Between friends the act of bowing is almost simul taneous, but it is the privilege of a woman to take the initiative by being the first to bow. As has been said, an introduction entitles every one to a bow. ')nly , for very grave reasons woulld anyone ever give a direct "cut,"' when the claimu an introdluction impuoses has been absolutely forfeited. I11 a case lwhere t hlere has b...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Infinities or Eternity. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

The infinities or Eternity. (By EDIOAR LUCIEN LAIKIN.) "Can there be two kinds of infini ties, or two infinite spaces ?" The writer of this question must decide. -. The nearest star is dis tant 25,000,000,000;000 .miles. .Go, to the star antd let each unit repre selit one nlile; then the distance rep resented by a line of ones,: 5 .trit lion 'miles long, subilergecs all hu man powers of.imaginatio,. liut write a row of 2"222"2)'2.. 23 trillion nmiles lone', Iher, the number of miles reprerrited" wt:ld-he .twice as great. Then write a, rnl" of 9.9999?. . equally as long, and the distance expressed p ould be nine times as great us that reprenllted b)f thie ones. uit no huaman bra'lirl coi think of the distance expressed by the ones. Let the first row of figures extend 25 trillion, or lifty, or a thousand trillion miles to the east ; then a row could be similarly ext.enledl toward the west Many mnillions of years would be required to write dluring one thonsand "million ways these long ...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
At an Ocean Dance. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

At an Ocean Dance. ,'ew things are more interesting thain a dance on an ocean liner when it is properly and officially or ganised. The promenade deck is at comnparatively commonplace affair Ibecfore. it takes place, but, the cap thin having given his sanction the deck becomes a place oi charm.I The flags of all nations are sull denly displayed in festoon and, bunting form, electric cablIles are run along the rioof and enable the ldeck to be lit up with all sorts of sihadles andl colours. T'I'h purser be comies the Master of the Cerenion ies. The captain and staff join a happy throng, and, by means of an efllicient orchestra, the dancing be comnes very delightful. It is a great event on the best liners, and very popular. All who cani dance, it is needless to s;ay, join in. The ollicinl time for lthe dantce is from 9 p.m. to itL p.m., and th+, only icriti.'ist, tne e ltors is as to its l)re\ itv. This is offton met by Ihe cetltintu anlce of the Ipla..uire unitil laIter than the iflici...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUBSTITUTE FOR A GLASS CUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

SUIISTITUTE F'OR A GLASS CUTTEIR. It sometimes happens that w-hen one has to cut glass a glass cutter is not at hand, or the one in use is worn out. The following will make a good substitute :'Take an old file, break the end and it will be. foundl that one corner will gene rally hliive avery sharp edge, which wili cut glass qiiite as well as atny cutter. Of course it-soon wears down, but it is:n merely necessary to hreak a Rnsmall piece off the file again, and it will be as sharp as before. A potato poultice is a good cure for toothache. Bake three or four dnesicetsled potatoes 1n: their skins, and ?,i'hn done break them into a Oannel :.-bag and hold it to the face while ver hot,

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Discovery by Accident. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Discovery by Accident. About the discovery of oil. in Pa pua anl interesting story went the rounds of the Pr-'ess -a "year or two ngs. A British traveller noticed a taste of wvhant he thought was kerosene oil in his ten, -and rebukedl his native boy for carelessness. The boy protested that he had allowed no oil to get near the kettle in which the water was boiled, aul, en investigating the source from which the water was obtained, his master found a filmn of trldle oil floating on the top, which gave Itheli kerosene taste to the ten. On his return the traveller told the rircumn st ances, and in consequence the dis trict .was exploredl, with the result hat evidetnces of petroleum were found. Early Ilast year a young foreigner Mr. F.elix GrCebin, was sent to P'a !un 1y a London syndicate, and he took with him a portable machine for the purpose of drilling for oil. ie puIt down two wells, andl in tile first of these petroleum was found at a depth of 228ft. A second well gave signs of p...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Interesting Animal. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

An Interesting Animal. --+- It is calculated that one kangaroo cats as miiuch raiss atld consuncles as Imuch toodi geierally tas do five sheep, and consecluentl- he is look edi upon as anl eaelnv ill Queenls land, to he huntedl \with the one idea of exterininating him alt'o gether. In roamlling the woouds there one, is almost -sure to finll i with lmore or less of- these arlilmls. "'hev are usually .foundl sitti ig utpright in circles) of a dozen or lnore, as gra, e astihough enigaged in holding a for tul coiincil." I heir short fore-paws hani lioop before them,. while their restless heals and delicate ears turn hither and thither in watchful care against surprise. \Vhen they are young tlhey- are as playful as kittens. Ev:\en when run niing a w\\- flrm pursuit-a lrocets performned by enOr'itious leaps. often cov'ering ia rod at each ilirigi junlrp -there is il certain air-i grace lant harnnoy of Ianovemcint at tending their niotions. Iitts ;1a1 1 horses hi\-ave more p)ower of endiiu...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Balmoral. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

S Balmoral. , ----+------ Balmoral is a typical Scottish castle, built in the old baronial style. The corridors are lined with stags' heads which ha.ve fallen to the guns of :- the Royal. sportsmen, whose names are placedl beneath the trophies. The pictures in the Castle are chiefly of sporting scenes,~ and Scottish landlscalPes, and the 1.oya-l tartan Iplaid is seen in curtains and upholstery. The Qtueen's priyate roomrs have a boautiful outlook o'er the De.L? Tl'oe wooded hill of (Craig (Gow'an rises at the back of the Castle, andi from its sum mit the honfires blaze to commlnellmor to famlily and nla tionale' eveuts. 'T'he last bonfire was in, honour of the iiing's Corona tion. ('aimrns abound on the hills of Ilalmoral, for throughout the seventy odd years itn which it has been a lIloyal residence, special family event.s have been miarkedl ini this Highland fishion. The idea was originated by tlhe (:airn-a-quheen, or the C.air of ]cienmimbrance, 'some mile and a half on the road ...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Aerial Battleships. GERMANY'S INTEREST IN ZEPPELIN'S IDEAS. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Aerial Battleships. + ------ +- G(-IRMANY'S IN\'EIiEST IN ZEP tPELIN N' IDI'AS. The traitgic wr'eck of the German naval airship Zeppelin L1 calls at tention 'to the remarkable develop ment of this type of airship since ('ount Zeppelin, thirteen years ago, made his lirst successful flights in a rigid dirigible of his own design. The 1,1 was a veritable monster of the air. 11er length was 525ift.. three and a half times the height of the Neton Monumennt in Trafalgar Square. andl her diameter 5Oft. IBut, in spite of her huge size, she could travel faster than an express train. IPropelled by three engines. each of 1,7h.p.. the I.I couli attain a speed of ;fty-two miiles ian hour. rise to a height of one mile. and could actual ly carry a weight of seven tons over and above her engines, cars, and fittings. In aiddition to a crew of twenty imen, the LI carried four imachine guns., and was l~o fitted with a wireless telegraphy installation cap abl' of sending meIssages 350 miles. h)'er Il1....

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Deep—Very Deep. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Deep-Very Deep. ------ +- + Tn Couunty Sligo there is a small lake renowned for its fabulous depth. .A professor happened to be in that part of Ireland during the summer, and started out oneIdaiy for a ramble among tile mountains, accompanied by a native guide. As they climb ed, Pat asked him if he would like to see this lake, '"for it's no bottom at all, sorr.' "But how do you know that, Pat ?" asked the professor. "Well. sorr, I'll tell ye. Me own cousin was showin' the pond to a gentleman one day, sorr, -and he loolkedi, incredulois like, just as voa do, aiid ino cousin couldn't stand it for hinm to doubt his weord,. sorr, and sc he said, ' Begorra, 1'11 pro\e the truth of me words,' and off wish his clothes and in he j'mnped." The professor's face wore ani ainuse(l and qui.zzical expression "Yes, sorr, ini he jumped, and didn't corme up again, at all,. at all." "But," said the Drofeissor, ;I don't" see your cousin piroved- his pointi by recklessly . lrownizg, himself"'' "Sure, s...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Handy for Camper. SIMPLE SLEEPING CONVENIENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Brunswick & Coburg Leader — 9 January 1914

Handy for Camper. -+ SIMPIT- SL1 1 PING( CON VENI ENtCE. A piece of canvas, coarse, unbleach ed sheeting, a bIlanket, or any c:ther piece of material, and 75ft. of strong s'sh cord., are all the mnaterials necessary to create this camper's equipment. No sewing is required, and . the outtit can be erected in a few minutes. It is light and-ctn be carried anywhere. Select two trees, or t wo poles, andl tie thp end of the rope to one of' these: then run the rope around t.he other three times. draw it inaut and run the end bhack tI the bIrst support and fasten it. T'hus t~wo, paraillel cords at ant d(esired height will be formed between the two supports. Spread out tihe cloth on the ground under the two ropes so that the side of the material to form the inniier Ipart of the hamimock is ulppernmost. iift one silde of the material, and place the edge over one A quickly constructod Stretcher, of the cords far enough to overlap about one-third the entire length of the material. Lift the oppo...

Publication Title: Brunswick & Coburg Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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