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Elephind.com contains 3,586 items from Hawkesbury Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SOME WARNINGS FOR GIRLS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

SOME WARNINGS FOR GIRLS. A man will not necessarily be a good hus- band because be has good tailor   Or because he has a handsome face and a fine moustache. Or because he is a favourite with other girls. Or because he is well to do. Or because he dances well. Or because he is your last chance Or your first. Printed in New South Wales.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS. Is is unquestionable that our Christmas festival is of Pagan origin; that it ia the sur- vival of sun-worship-one form of that great and universal phallic creed which would seem to be as old and as ubiquitous as mankind. Who can say for how many thousands, or scores of thousands, of years the souls of men   were moved to hope and joy by the return of the sun to vivify and bless the earth? The end of the winter solstice was a period of expectancy and promise, celebrated by joy- ful feasting, curious customs, and appropri- ate worship, and the first day of every week was dedicated hy our Anglo-Saxon ancestors to the solar deity. Christianity appropriated the Pagan festivals to its own cult with as few innovations as possible so as not to shock too rudely the conservative susceptibilities of its converts. And thus the time of year of the universal Saturnalia was fixed upon as the precise period of the birth of Christ, the spiritual Son-" the Sun of right...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RUTH AND THE GANDER. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

RUTH AND THE GANDER Ruth Leslie and her mother lived in a little cottage on the border of the moor. Mrs. Leslie kept a flock of geese, and it was Ruth's duty to drive them out on the moor in the morning, and drive them home again in the evening. The leader of the flock was an old gander, who would attack anybody and perhaps do them some harm, if they teased him. Now, Ruth was always delighted to be able to tease anybody, and her mother had great difficulty in preventing a battle between Ruth and the gander. Ruth was always one of the gander's greatest enemies. One morning she got up in a very bad humour, and when she went downstairs she began by teasing the cat. Her mother saw what was coming, and after breakfast she told Ruth to be sure and not tease the gander. Ruth's reply ww, " I shall tease him if I want to." So off she started. When they were out of sight of the cottage. Ruth began teasing the gander by rushing back- wards and forwards in front of him, and impeding his progres...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INSTANCES OF ANIMAL REASONING. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

INSTANCES OF ANIMAL REASONING.         In an interesting article in the current num- ber of the " Land Magazine," Mr. A. Smith, in replying to a previous paper on the sub- ject of the reasoning power of animals, ex- presses the opinion that not only the higher members of the animal world, but all living organisms, have in addition to their natural instincts a greater or less amount of reasoning power, which they bring into use as occasion requires. In support of this theory the writer gives the following instances of special sagacity: When I was a boy, about ten years of age, my father had a very fast mare which became touched in her wind. Her oats and chaff were therefore given damped. A tank also was always kept full of water in her stall, and I have repeatedly seen this mare pull the hay from her rack and dip it in the water be- fore eating it. As a matter-of-fact, the mare never ate any hay without dipping it in the water. Ther...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN AUDACIOUS M.P [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

AN AUDACIOUS M.P. Sir Boyle Roche bad au excellent memory; so good, indeed, as to give rise to the belief that his speeches were written for him by abler hands, and got by heart by Sir Boyle. On one occasion (says the " Cornhill Maga- zine ") he illustrated the accuracy of his memory and the audacity of his character at the expense of a brother member. Mr. Serjeant Stanley, anxious to produce an eifect in an important debate, had been at the pains to reduce his speech to writing. Unluckily for himself, the Serjeant happened to drop his manuscript in the coffee room, and walked back to the House unconscious of his loss. Sir Boyle Roche, picking up the document, speedily made himself master of its contents, and,rising at the first opportun- ity, delivered the speech almost verbatim, in   the hearing of its dismayed and astonished autbor. Sir Boyle's apology, when he had finished, only added insult to injury. " Here my dear Stanley is your speech again, and I thank you ver...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JACK FROST ANIMUS CROWBAR. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

JACK FROST AND HIS CROWBAR He was a pinched little fellow in a frosty jacket, and from his pointed little chin ran down a long, pointed icicle, like a fashion- ably trained whisker. Under his arm he bore a quaint little painting outfit, while his right hand grasped a tiny crowbar. It was his first visit of the season, and in his little wallet tucked in his frozen jacket he carried his visiting cards. I took a peep at one where he stopped to leave it and it read: Prof. Jacob Frost, 375a, Snappy-street, Icicle Town, North Pole. The little fellow's sharp eyes twinkled with fun, as he left his card on the window, for it was at a wood-covered house, where he had just played one of his pranks on the in- mates. Peeping in at the window and finding them all asleep, he made several frosty faces at them, and then flying upon the clapboards of the house he prised at them with his crow- bar till they flew back with such a crack that the fat, drowsy man within stopped in the middle of a snore to...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SPECIAL SCOTCH. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

SPECIAL SCOTCH. Scene-Provision Shop in Glasgow. Woman, familiarly to Peter, the principal salesman: Ha pennyworth o' saut, Peter. Peter hands her a halfpennyworth of salt- petre. ' Woman: Di ye ca' that ha'pennyworth of saut ? Peter: Ye said sautpetre. There have been many attempted explana -   tions of the word " Jubilee." One of tbe most recent is that suggested in the course of a conversation between two Scotch fish wives, one of them said to the other, " Eh,   wumman, can ye tell me what a jublee is, for I hear a' the folk speakin' about it?"   ' Ou, ay," replied the other, I can tell ye that ; ye see when a man and wumman hae been marrit for five and twenty year, that's a siller weddin' ; and when .they've been marnt for fifty years that's a gooden wed- din'; but when the man's dead, that's a jublee." The late Rev. Hugh Stowell Brown once wrote : " To-day I met a Scotchman who     very kindly and without solicita...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A JUDICIAL MAN A DOC COMBAT. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

A JUDICIAL MAN A DOG COMBAT. On the 8th October, 1361, there took place on the Island of Notre Dame, Paris, a com- bat which both illustrates strikingly the maxims and ideas prevalent in that age. and is perhaps the most singular instance on re-   cord of the appeals to " the judgment of God " in criminal cases. M. Aubry de Montdidier, a French gentle- man, when travelling through the Forest of Bondy, was murdered and buried at the foot of a tree. His dog remained for several days beside his grave, and only left the spot when urged by hunger. The faithful animal proceeded to Paris, and presented himself at the house of an intimate friend of his mas- ter's, making the most piteous howliugs to announce the loss which he had sustained. After being supplied with food be renewed his lamentations, moved towards the door, looked round to see whether he was followed, and returning to his master's friend laid hold of him by the coat, as if to signify that he should come along wi...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ESSAY ON MAN. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

AN ESSAY ON MAN Man that is born of a woman is few of days and full of microbes. The moment he hits the earth he starts for the grave, and the longer he travels the faster he goes. His visible reward for long days of labour, and nights of walking the floor with a teething baby is an epitaph he can't read and a tomb- stone he doesn't want. In the first of the seven ages of man he's licked, in the last he's neglected, and in all the others he's a target for the lying, meddlesome mischief maker-a woman who won't tend to her own business. If he does not marry his first love he'll always wish he had, and if he does he'll always wish he hadn't. Yet no man ever follows freedom's flag for patriotism (and a pension) with half the enthusiasm that he will trail the red, white, and blue that con- stitutes the banner of female beauty. He will brave the lion in his den. face the boom- ing cannon, tread the ocean foam beneath his feet, and yet will tremble like a half- frozen, egg-sucking duck whe...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUEER TRINKETS WORN BY WOMEN [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

QUEER TRINKETS WORN BY WOMEN   " Women are traditionally supposed to be allowed to wear what they will, and accord- ingly they sometimes wear the most extra- ordinary things. ln my business," said a prominent West-end jeweller to a contribu- tor, "yon see how eccentric some women can be. The usual things we sell in the way of brooches, bracelets, etc, are quite too con- ventional, and if an article isn't odd, un- familiar, or outre, then there is no sale for it. " One of the oddest bracelets I have ever made was that for an American lady, whose husband had succumbed to the bite of a rattlesnake. The venomous reptile was cap- tured and killed. The lady decided to have the snake's skin made into bracelets, with a silver setting. These I prepared, and now she may be occasionally seen in society with the identical bracelets on her arm. The eyes of the rattlesnake are diamonds, each of which is worth £500, while the tail is simi- larly decorated with the precioun stone. " Be...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VEGETABLES IN GOOD QUEEN BESS'S TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

VEGETABLES IN GOOD QUEEN BESS'S TIME. Speaking of the neglect-into which some of   the vegetables had fallen under the early   Tudor kings, Harrison says, in striking con- trast is his own day, where " their use is not only resumed among the poor commons, I mean of melons, pumpkins, gourds, cucum- bers, radishes, skirets, parsnips, carrots, cabbages, navews, turnips, and all kinds of salad herbs, but also fed upon as dainty dishes at the table of delicate merchants, gentlemen, and the nobility, who make their provision yearly for new seeds out of strange countries, from whence they hare them abundantly." And then he vents his dis- pleasure upon those venturesome people who, not satisfied with this abundance, add to their dishes mushrooms and veranges. Even with, his long list, Harrison misses several important vegetables. Beans, for instance, were common; and we are told by one writer that the Bristol merchants used to buy up large quantities of them " as f...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PROFITABLE MARKET. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

A PROFITABLE MARKET.     Nothing; is lost in a good market, as the   following story shows:-A young man, brought up in the city of London to the business of an undertaker, went to Jamaica. Business flourished, and he wrote to his father to send him, with a quantity of black   and grey cloth, twenty gross of black Tacks.   Unfortunately, he had omitted the top to   his T, and the order stood twenty gross of   black Jacks.   His correspondent, on receiving the letter,   recollected a man, near Fleet Market, who   made quart and pint tin pots, ornamented with paintings, and which were called black Jacks, and to him he gave the order for the twenty gross. The undertaker rec ived them with other   consignments,and was astonished at the mis- take. A friend offered consolation by pur- chasing the whole at the invoice price. His   friend...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FIRST CHRISTMAS CARDS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

THE FIRST CHRISTMAS CARDS. Before the Christmas card was modestly ushered into the world, the greetings of the season were written to dear and distant friends on old-world notepaper with pinked out edges-the kind which is now in favour with sentimental servant girls-and,to render the kind wishes appropriate, a little robin was printed at the top of the paper, sur- rounded by a wreath of holly and a suitable word of greeting. It may be surmised that the inventor of the Christmas card in England, Sir Henry Cole (then Mr. Cole), found that he had too many letters to write at the festive season, for in 1846 he suggested that Mr. J. C. Horsley, R.A., should design a card, with appropriate greeting, which should be sent round to all his circle, the primary idea being to make the memento of the season significant of Christmas jollification. Rather more than a year earlier a similar idea, but not so feliciously executed, had been carried out by a Scotch engraver. His card showed a laughing ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRE-NUPTIAL CHATTER. THE SCHOOL TEACHER. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 6 October 1899

PRE-NUPTIAL CHATTER. THE SCHOOL TEACHER,   Surely ne'er so sweet a creature (Slight in form and fair in feature) As my prim and pretty teacher Has this world produced before. And when first I had the pleasure. Strolling in the hour of leisure. To behold the dainty treasure. Cupid's arrow smote me sore. How to get an introduction To this vendor of instruction I contrived without a ruction With her people or with mine. Then in walks, just after school-time. Or in evening's sweet and cool time We discovered how to fool time Fast away-'twas bliss divine! Happy scholars who may listen. And may see her dark eyss glisten, You've the teacher I should christen Best and fairest maid of all. When on me her eyes are beaming. With a love so tender gleaming. Life is joyous in our dreaming Paradise without a fall ! But in class, with manner stately. She, as one who's " laced " most straitly. Lectures how to act sedately Quite a Puritan is she. But my prim and proper preacher Leaves th...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WALKING ROUND THE WORLD. A Long Stroll. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

WALKING ROUND THE WORLD. A Long Stroll. Mr. George M. Schilling, who has undertakes the formidable task of walking round the world, called in at the ADVOCATE office on Thursday after- noon last, after completing .about 13,000 miles of the journey. Schilling has for many years enjoyed the title of champion long distance walket' of the United States, tte is a perfect model of an athlete^ and a magnificent specimen of manhood, although mis- fortune has robbed him of one of his arms, which he lost when only nine years of age, being caught in a ma- chine in an ase factory at Pittsburg, the limb being torn off at the shoulder. He started on his " stroll " from New York on August 3rd, 1897, without ' money or clothes, being attired in a newspaper suit. Should he be success- ful in his trip he will receive 5,000 dollars on his return to New York, but he is not to beg, borrow, or spend money during his travels, and must j return with 5,000 dollars in his posses : sion. His only companion is ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To Whom It May Concern. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

To Whom It May Concerti. , Here are a few "junks " of wisdom you will do well to store up in the cells of your honeycomb brain ior future use: The man whom nobody hears of-is the one who has a morbid business-; there, are " cobwebs on his shelves, and moss on his doorstep ! VTlie man who is never forgotten is the man who keeps his wares before the public. He ¡Sets t7ie tracie while the other fellow snores I He wins trade. He makes money. Why 2 Because he advertises, and therefore cannot be forgotten But ié's an curt to advertise properly. If yon don't have striking creations, you might jnst as well pitch your dollars into the Hawkesbury. The public wiil not look at your ad. unless it's *? catchy " ; therefore, advertise on the principle of how Goodt not how Cheap Two facts, specially manufactured for this festive season :-The business man who nses Printers' Ink may go on a vacation because he can spare the money. The other fellow may take a spell because he j can spare the time. See...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NORTH RICHMOND. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

- NORTH RICHMOND. A very pleasant gathering took place at the Wesleyan Schoolroom at North Bichmond on Monday evening last, when the members of the Y.M.M.I. Society and their friends, numbering between sixty and seventy, met for their quarterly social. A very interesting programme was arranged,, and thoroughly appreciated by all dulged in during the evemng.~~TKisj Society, although not very large, meets I regularly every week and forms a very happy family. Following was the programme given :-" The Village, Festival,''by the orchestra, composed of Misses Boughton (piano¡ nnbTviolín}¿ Mr. Wood (violin) and Mr. Boughton (bass) ; solo. " I dreamed a" dream," Miss Booth; solo, "The nightless land," Miss Mathieson; Selections on Mr. Middleton's phonograph ; solo, " Home they brought the warrior dead." Miss Myra Mathieson; solo, "¿E dream of thee," Miss Winter; duet, "The Gipsy," Misses Mathieson; song, "The Gas," Mr. Spain; solo, " Sunshine and rain," Miss Turner ; Selections on the phono...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Miss Birdle Kildulf's Birthday Party. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

Miss Birdie Hildulfs Birthday Party. One of the most pleasant gatherings of the i season was held at the Union Hall, George ; street, Windsor, on Wednesday evening last, the occasion being a birthday party given by Sliss Birdie Kilduf! to a host of friends. The hall was beautifully decorated with ferns, palms, ornamental trees, lanterns, life bouya, and flags, artistically arranged, this, the work of Mr, J. O'Brien, proved he is possessed of no small amount of skill as a decorator. We have never seen the hall looking so pretty as on this occasion. At an early hour ia the evening those guests who had received invita- tions commenced to arrive on the scene. At 8.30. Miss Birdie Kilduff attired in a pretty white silk dress with salin trimmings, and opera hood to match, escorted by Mr. Colonel Mayne, pat in an appearance, they were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Hayna and Mr. and Mrs. Kilduff The ball was shortly after set rolling. In nearly every instance those who had received invitation...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOCIAL. WEDDING. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

SOCIAL WEDDING. At the St, Peter's Church, Richmond, on Wednesday last, Miss Blanche Sly, daughter of Mr. W. Sly, of Richmond, and Mr. Henry Powell, of Richmond Bottoms, were united, in holy matrimony. The Rev. J» Howell* Price performed the ceremony, and the church was crowded with friends. The bride was attired in a very becoming dress of grey glace silk, richly embroidered with steel triming on grey chiffon, and white tucked yoke of silk and chiffon, with a very pretty grey hat, trimmed with grey and white chiffon and gay tips. She carried a handsome shower bouquet of white cania* tiona and ferns, and wore a neat brooch of diamonds and sapphires, the gift of the bridegroom. The chief bridesmaid was Miss Jessie Sly, attired in a very pretty' cos- tume of cream silk lustre, trimmed with satin and rich guipure lace, with hat of pale helitrope shade, trimmed with chiffon and hydrange. She also carried a handsame bouquet, and wore a gold cable bangle, the gift of the bridegroom. The b...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Late Mr. Aquilla Hagger. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 13 October 1899

The Late Mr. Aquilla Hagger. The funeral of the late Mr. Aquilla Hagger, whose death was referred to in our last issue, took place on Friday- afternoon last from his son's residence in North-street. The cortege was a very representative Ohe, most of the leading townspeople being in attendance. The pall-bearers were Messrs. John Dickson, J. J. Fitzpatrick, J. T. Bowthorn and John Moore. The coffin* which was of polished cedar mounted with silver, was covered with wreaths. The inter- ment took place at St. Matthew's Church of England Cemetery, the Bev. S. G. Fielding conducting the funeral service. Mr. T. Collison carried out the duties of undertaker. The deceased was 60 years of age, and for the greater period of that time had resided in Windsor. He arrived in the colony in the s.s. Speedy about 41 years ago, and went to work for the late Mr. John Wood (Mrs. W. Gosper's father), after which he started farming and dairying in the Peninsula on his own account. He had been a tenant of M...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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