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Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 428 items from Australian Producer's Home Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DAIRY DOTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

DAIRY DOTS. It doesn't take long to clean up the niilkin'g yard, and the time is well spout. Swine fever has been extirpated ill Denmark, aud the disease is uow un known there. Keep the cows iu health. This way profits are increased and possible losses minimised. Good feeding adds to the value of the cow. as it does k- (Suit of every animal on tlie farm. There is no dilliculty in managing the separator; an intelligent child can learn to handle oue in a few days. Milk microbes thrive and multiply at blood beat; they are killed when the milk Is heated to boiling. it will pay K- have a handsepara tor where there are only a few cows; it will earn its cost in no time. Experiments have demonstrated that calves fed on eodliver oil instead of milk have done better than the milk-fed. Do not keep tilie cow whose milk Is only up to the value of skim when it is submitted to the test of tlie sepa rator. Ordinary cream from the separa tor tests to about per cent, o? . butter fat, which some runs ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HANDS ACROSS THE SEAS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

HANDS ACROSS THE SEAS. ' In a recent issue of the ' 'Federal Magazine.' which is a monthly pub lication issued by the League of the Emj'ire. from Loudon, there appears the following letter, written by a Scottish girl to her Australian oom rade : — ' Dear Friend. — 1 am going to tell you about Kirkwall, which i.s situ ated at the head of a fine bay. The occupations of the Orkneys, ot which mv home, Kirkwall. is the chief town, are fishing, sheep and horse roaring, cultivation of oats, barley and potat,-es. The majority of tho women are splendid knitters. Kirk waLl i.s becoming a popular holiday resort. In the summer time a gre^it many people visit it to see the St. Magnus Cathedral and other his torical buildings. There are few tret\s in Kirkwall, and what there are never grow higher than loft, or 20ft. But there Ls one in the centre of Albert-street, which Ls called the 'Big Tree,' because it stands alone. On entering the town a stranger Ls suriirised at the ancient appearanoe of Br...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN OLD-TIME PORKER. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

AN OLD-TIME PORKER. (An American Yarn.) Embedded in a matrix of sand stone iu north-western Nebraska there was recently uncovered a huge skeleton which the zoologists uf the Nebraska University declare to be t.he skeleton of an aboriginal beg that wallowed in the central marsh es possibly 100,000 years ag:- or 1, 000,000 years ago — the zoologists are disposed to allow themselves con siderable leeway in the matter of dates. Hut if they are right in I their conclusion that this prehistoric j hog would have weighed UIXJ'J I pounds on the hoof, there is no j avoiding the inference that the most thoroughbred porker now developing high-priced hams iu the state of Ne braska is a degenerate. A hog that stood ten feet high at the shoulders and iluul tusks like the horns of a Texas steer and was iu groAvlli like a full-grown elephant would certain ly make a sweep of the blue ribbons if lie could only be sent the rounds '.if the modern agricultural fairs. If, as the Nebraska scientists be lie...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KIPLING TO A SCHOOL-GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

KIPLING TO A .SCHOOL-GIRL. Nannie Peck, a little girl who lives in Washington, wrote a letter ad dressed. ?'?Rudya.rd Kipling, Eng land,' and got an answer from the well-known litterateur. Nannie is twelve years old. and a great ad mirer of Kipling. She noticed with alarm one day that liLs books tliat she had read were outnumbering those she had nor. It occurred to her that in a little while she would have read all of Mr. Kipling's books, so she wrote the author a letter ex I're.ising her fear, and asking him not to sto|.' writing. Kipling's letter runs : — 'My Dear .\I:*- Nannie Peck. — Thank you very much for vour let ter (undated) from Washington, and for the nice things you write about my books. That i.s just the right way to write to an author. Some people have a lot of what they call reservations' and 'limi rations' and 'points of difference.' and other un interesting things, but I rejoice to see you haven'.t. I hope you will have a happy -time as you grow up, and find a great...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MILK RECORDS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

MILK RECORDS. There Is a great tendency to de velop the keeping of milk records, and many farmers are doing tills work uow who hooted the idea a few years ago. The question has been asked if a good milk record Increa ses tho market value of an animal or its progeny, and the answer may be given that It does not, the mar ket, or the farmers of tliat district, must he a long way behind the lauil-rt. vii lliu Hive Vl 11, H l'W-V Ulill can be guaranteed to yield, say, 700 gallons of milk iu twelve months will fetch more than oue that yields only MHO- Nobody sells a cow of the former kind, however. Hut? they sell thi1 calves or lieirers from them, aud these actually do fetch enhanc ed values when the performances of the parents are known. For in stance, a yearling bull calf, worth in a certain northern market alwut £7 in the ordinary way, rose to f-S in an opeu auction when it was known that Ills mother yielded over 1000 gallons of milk annually, and his sire was also of a milking strain....

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN GOOD SPIRITS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

IN GOOD SPIRITS. . S An Irishman who was repairing a ' vat at a distillery fell into it. Being liulf full of whisky, lie was nearly drowned, and was rescued with great j difficulty. The foreman came' upon the scene f ju.st after, and seeing Pat's clothes all dripping, said — ''That was a narrow escape, Pat, I mo bhoy.' I 'Ay. indeed, your honour,' said I Pat, ''but I should have died in goctl spirits any way 1' fii

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DAIRY. COMPULSORY GRADING. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

. TH Ej DAIRY, ^ kpf COMPULSORY GRADING. F & New Zealand knows all about [ compulsory grading aud anything it [ lias to say on tlie subject is of great i Interest and possible help to tin. At 1 the recent Dairy Factory Managers' Conference, held at Wellington, Now Zealand, one of tlio most Instructive papers was rend by Mr. T. Quirk, of Koninl, one of the acknowledged successful men iu dairy farming. a sixteen years' test. Compulsory grading of butter In New Zealand. Mr. (Juirlc pointed out. Itiis been fully tested during a period of sixteen years. It is quite a com mon practice for parties of factory managers to visit tlie grading stores wiieu large lines of t'.lieir produce are passing through. They grade along witth the experts, under a sys tem of hidden marks, which prevents any possibility of identifying the produce during tlie time that grad ing is iu progress. The education obtained in his way is invaluable, and the result sometimes takes the conceit out of a manager,...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MOTHER'S LOVE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

A MOTHER'S LOVE. Oh, somehow, the primal pis-ion ,| Of the soul has waxed and waned, ; And much has been lost in vigour I And much in mildness gained, ! But ever through all the ages, j Since the world from chaos came, Unchanging and true and fervent, A mother's love's the same. j Men love with a calmer fervour j In an intellectual way, j And the mate tiioy choose is colder : Than upon that early day ' When Adam and Eve were happy ; We offer no praise, no blame, But somehow we're glad forever! A mother's love's the same. She goes through the death-dark val ley That one may have boon of life, And her.s is a constant vigil Through years that are danger rife. Forever till death shall part them, Whatever Its pomp or shame, Her baby is hers, un-altered, And a mother's love's the same.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

MOBIIIT OH' TJSIE1 HaA-Mrs^ILI j LIQUID MOLASSES forms at once the best and most nutritious food for Horses, Cows, Calves Shpen I am he Pio-cnnrl I Poultry. It only requires mixing with Hay, Strtuv, Chaff, Husks, Bran, Pollard, Wheat, Oats, Maize 'or damaged foods and the 1 outlay is trifling compared with results, being obtained daily by all classes of men on the Land. . b I Write for instructive pamphlet and price which will be sent, post free, by — . | Molasses Fodder Co., j

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

Ms°. FARMER '' ? . . g You could not possibly have anything1 better than a \ i| :*-:J for drivingf your SEPARATOR or any other class ) | of machinery on a Farm. Tlie FERRO -s n°t only ' |? ,,j the SIMPLEST and MOST RELIABLE Engine on = | | j the market ; but it is Half the Frice of other ? |j Engines of similar power. There are more FERRO ' 1 Engines sold than any other make of Engine IN I - v_ THE WORLD. } There must be a reason- for this. I ©vor 1000 are in use In Australia.'? Send for Cataloguo. ft SOLE AGENTS— | : HALL E10S.9 51 & S3 Druiti St. j I SYDNEY (near Town Hall) j

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHEEP AND TOBACCO. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

SHEEP AND TOBACCO. The 'American Sheepbreeder'' re- ; oords : — 'Trainloads of tobacco are now ; being fed to sheep and lambs. lt^-s ? no longer, 'Will tobacco prevent or . cure stoma-sh worms and is it safe I to feed it? Let tho educators and the experimentalists say t\\ hat they will, the tobacco treatment is 'doing the work' all over tlus land. Tobac co, dither in the proprietary medi cines and foods or fed alone with sa.lt, is saving hundreds of thou sands of lambs and that means the salvation of thousands of ttockmcyi who had almost given up in despair their fight against the stomach and intestinal pasts. Don't be a.fvaid of tobacco. l^eed it three times a week. Give it to your horses and colts and your hogs. If they are wormy or out of condition, you will noto * a radical change in three weeks.' A sheep is rarely valuable enough to keep after it is six years old. Fatten and sell it.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

RELIABLE FRUIT TREES— Plant Now Our treeB are olean, healthy and vigorous and guaranteed tiue to name. Apples, PersiimuoiiH, Nectarines, Cherries, Quinces, Peaches, Pears, Apricots, Plums, all at 1/- each. 10/- per doz. Figs, 1/- each 9/-doz., Grapes 6d. each 4/- per doz. &e. tipeei.il quotes for larger quantities, also Ornamental Shade. Shelter and Flowering Trees and Shrubs, Hedge Plants, Roses, etc., etc. Everything in plants at lowest price for top quality. Catalogue gratis aud post free. J. MILLIGAN & Co7, sTqueen victoria markets ? ESTABLISHED i883. ? ~ SYDNEY. —

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WARDING OFF SHEEP DISEASES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

WAR DI.VG OFF SHE LP DISK AS EH. Few flock owners realise the dan ger involved in permitting sheep to pasture where they can drink out of stagnant pools. No other one place about the average farm is more filthy with deadly germ diseases than small depressions containing water which has no inlet or outlet. During a wet season there is increased danger, especi.ii II v if the land is somewhat rolling. It is a common practice . among flock owners to allow their ! sheep to pasture on low, wet land I where the water level is very near i the surface. While sheep are very J particular relative to the kind of food they consume they will readily drink, when thirsty, from stagnant pools and become infested with the deadly stomach worm. Sheep should always be pastured on upland free from small depressions where water can accumulate and become stag nant. It is a great deal easier to ward off an attack of internal dis eases than administer a treatment. . Keeping the ewes in good flesh condition d...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

] TGfll iliT BHSUIMB6E I J against CROP FAILURE is that 8 ,| Wonderful Combination — GOOD Jf CULTIVATION and ? 1 - mm mm rcPiy i - lllllilLu w ilLiulyill® j Read the RECORDS in our new pamphlet. | SMMJS¥, LIMITS© | 279 GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY i * ? ? . .... j., ? It j hi .. ? ? in i I Ui i i

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FROM AN AMERICAN PAPER. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

FROM AX AMERICAN' PAPER. The largest sheep owners in the world are Scotchman, and contrary to the popular idea that all the biggest things in sheep and wool are found in Australia, the largest sheep ranch is not in that English colony nor in Argentine, but in Chili, and is managed and controlled by Scotch men — two 'canny Scots' — and they have tho job of looking after 2,500, 000 head of the woolly tribe that range over_ 2,4Q0..000 acres of land. Yon find a country where the Scotch man isn't a prominent figure in the sheep world and you will have to visit some other planet.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BY THE WAY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

BY THE WAY. Sow a small amount of the best seed obtainable per acre. Learn to take advantage of soil conditions. Learn that cultivation conserves moisture. Do good and thorough work; it _ will pay. Learn by the experience of others: take some good farm papers. * Learn to rotate your crops nrnl keep everlasting at it, and success is assured. Retili.se there i.s always a ready market for first-class stock and that . scrubs don't pay. Make up your mind what you ? intend to do, make your plans ac cordingly, and carry out your ideas. Do not forget that to raise crops and feed them successfully requires brains as well as muscle. Do not forget that farmers are realising that there is much more in being an up-to-date farmer than most of us used to think. Don't overseod. Don't sow broadcast. Don't forget to harrow the weeds as soon as they appear. Don't plough when your soil is wet. Don't harrow or cultivate your land when it is wot. Don't use poor seed and exj oct good results. Don't sow gr...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

NOTES A sound fleece and healthy flceco go together. Care and pampering are entirely different things. Those who keep mixed flocks of sheep cannot expect top prices for their wool clip, i A healthy growing condition of the system is shown by a bright oily con dition of the fleece. A gcod flock of sheep makes an nual payments of both interest and principal on tho capital invested. Never buy a ram for a breeder, wh ose ewe is scanty on the belly and legs. He should be well covered and the 'iietce ^Jioiild be uniform. One ladvxpafcag© with ewe is tlie shrinkage is not serious a loss as with many other of our farm pro ducts. A sheep that is in good condition for growing a healthy fleece has a double value to the farmer who then caters for the butcher and tho cloth merchant. Sheep aire a value instead of a de triment to the farm and pastures. They eat plants, weeds, etc., which other stock refuse/thus acting as primer. The sheep that ane culled out to be nwrketed should be put on good pa...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLEAN ORCHARD CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

CLEAN ORCHARD CULTURE. j ''Clean culture in the orchard, sup plemented by cover crops during the latter part of the year, is coming in to more general use,' said Professor H. A. Huster, before the Indiana Horticultural Society. 'The effect of fhe clean culture is to render the soil-nitrogen available more rap-idlv than the mineral ingredients. Hence alio tendency of trees to make too nilK.1, „mn.4l, ? .1 .... ) l l.' ? 1 wi --i wu anu lonage aim to come into bearing late. Where leguminous crops are used for cover this effect is oven more marked. The growth of legumes 01: weeds at the time the fruit is making its most rapid growth deprives the trees of needed minerals at .the most critical time. The whole tendency of the methods of orchard management most frequently advocated i.s to furnish nitrogen in excess of the proper amounts of minerals. Ordinarily, fruit trees require plant food in the following proportions : Nitrogen. 100 ; phosphoric acid, 27 ; potash. 114. Different kinds o...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOLASSES OFFER. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

MOLASSES OFFER, Attention is aeked to a special 11 da-s cut-price offer, of the Fiji Molasses company, which appears on page 10.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IS IT WORTH WHILE? [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 23 August 1910

IS IT WORTH WHILE? Is it worth while that we jostle a brother, Bearing his load 011 the rough road of life? Is it worth while that we jeer at each other Iu blackness of heart ?— (that wo war to tl.e knife? God pity us all in our pitiful strife ! | God pity us all as we jostle each 1 other ; God pardon us for tl.e triumphs we feel When a fellow goes down ; poor heartbroken brother Pierced to tho heart — words are keener than steel, And mightier far for woe or 'for weal. Were it not well in this brief little journey, On over tho Isthmus, down into the Ude. We give him a fish instead of a serpent, Ere folding the hands to be and abide, For ever and aye, in dust at his side? Look at the roses saluting each other ; Look at the herds all at pence on the plain; Man, and man only, makes war 011 his brother, , And dotes in 'his heart on his peril and pain, ShamcMl by the rrutea that go down on the plain. Is it worth while that we battle to - humble Some poor fellow traveller down In the dust...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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