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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Important from California -- SO,OOO Troops offered tl»e Kovernment—The First Detachment Under General Sumner Ordered to Texas. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Important from California -- SO,OOO Troops offered tl»e Kovernment—The First Detachment Under General Sumner Ordered to Texas. We learn last evening from reliable sources, that the State of California has offered the government 50,000 troops, and that the War Department has accepted them. The first order from the War Department went out last night by the Pony Express. It directs four regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, to proceed to Western Texas. It is stated in official quarters that the 50,000 men will reach the Misssssippi Valley within lorty days.—[Missouri Dem. Aug. 15. 8@™ FOKTRESS MONKOF., Aug. 18.—Gen. Wool assumed command at Old Point this morning. Lieut. C. C. Churchill is acting Adjutant Geneial. The presence ot General W«ol is already having a good effect upon the troops. The volunteer regiments are fast receiving their new uniforms, and their condition is in every respect improving.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Feeling of Security In Washington-Senator Wilson Connected wllhtten. McClellan'* Staff. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Feeling of Security In Washington-Senator Wilson Connected wllhtten. McClellan'* Staff. W ASHINGTON, August 22.—A feeling of security pervades our entire community both it) social and business relations. The reports, therefore, that ourcitizensare panic struck, and men, women and children fleeing from thecity, are positively untrue. Some apprehensions existed several days ago, but this was soon quieted by the measures ot the Administration to guard against all possible contingencies. The feints of the rebels on the line of the Potomac are now better understood, and military men whose opinions are entitled to great respect, say that even wilh the ordiuary dependence on raw troops, thej would desire nothing better than for Johnson or Beauregard to attempt that part of the rebel programme which contemplates an advance on Washington-It is reasonably suspected in as reliable quarters, that this rallying cryis adopted to sustain the flagging spirits of the rebel troops, whose ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest from Gen. Siegel's Command. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Latest from Gen. Siegel's Command. ST. LOUIS , August 20.—Gen. Siegel and Major Conant and several other officers, arrived from Rolla last night. The train also brought a large number of the wounded belonging to the different regiments engaged in the late battle near Springfield, who were conveyed to the hospitals or taken in charge by friends and relatives.— Captain Maunce was ordered this morning to proceed to Springfield under a flag of truce, with a guard and ambulances, to bring in Captain Cavander, Corporal Conart, and the body of Gen. Lyon.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Rebel Project for Attacking Washington. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Rebel Project for Attacking Washington. You were advised last week that a movement of a rebel force from the east em shore of Virginia into Maryland was on foot This manoeuvre of the enemy begins to assume formidable proportions and considerable importance. It is ascertained that instead ot being intended merely to arouse the rebels iu Maryland, and sustain its disunion Legislature in enforcing an ordinance of secession, it is designed to co-operate in the attack upon thecity ot Washington, by seizing the railroads and canals and cutting off coniuiucalion, between Philadelphia and Baltimore, simultaneously with the-attack on Washington under Beauregard and Johnston. The plan is well matured. The lower part of the Deleware is filled with rebels. There are companies of rebels already organized and armed there, as well as in the lower counties of the Eastern shores of Maryland. Rebels from all the other parts of Maryland have been recently flooding that section. Numbers have ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
General* [lo»eeranz and Lee. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

General* [lo»eeranz and Lee. The alarmed condition of the public mind regarding .Western Virginia, as reflected through the newspapers and by persons arriving from Ohio, prompts me, continues this correspondent, to recur to our condition. 1 therefore reiterate that, as tar as I am able to form an opinion upon a knowledge of the substantial facts involved, oui columns are slowly pushing forward with feelings tit coo^dence, and that with ordinary prudence and fair conduct, the campaign will prove eminently successful, 'lhe Union people of Virginia are needlessly alarmed at the approach of Lee. His name seems to inspire them wilh disagreeable forebodings, and causes them to magnify his army and exaggerate his reputation. On lhe other hand their acquaintance wilh Gen. Rosecranz is limited, and they are not therefore inspired with reasonable confidence in his military ability. Regular army officers, acquainted with both, regard Rosecranz superior to the rebel leader in most ot the ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
News from Gen. Banks' Army. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

News from Gen. Banks' Army. A letter from Sandy Hook, dated Baltimore, August 10, 1861, says :—"A gentleman from Martinsburg yesterday reports small parties of irregular rebel cavalry scouting that section of the country, and daily firing upon our pickets and Union fugitives as well as paying frequent visits to the town. Yesterday a party appioached to within two miles of Harper's Feiry, fire"d upon our pickets and retreated. Last night it is reported a party of one hundred and thirty rebel cavalry captured three men of our Second cavalry picket, stationed just outside ot Harper's Ferry. The camps remain very quiet. All appear to have perfect confidence in ^Gen. Banks and staff, as well as the brigade officers.— Parties trom Winchester report only foor thousand militia rendezvoused there for the purpose of being drilled and disciplined. The same authority states that there are two regiments of regulars at Lovettsville, about eight miles distant. EF*Our wounded at Springfield...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Recruiting Business. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Recruiting Business. Misrepresentations and false inducements, held out at the time ot enlistment, are often the primary causes of insubordination among the volunteers. This should be avoided, and a plain statement of what each man must expect when he becomes a soldier substituted. We notice that some of the placards and advertisements calling for volunteers in the various regiments announce that those who have already been in the service rective a bounty irorn the Government of thirty dollars as a reward for re-enlisting. This is not the case, and the fact should be-known by all discharged volunteers, in order to avoid future trouble. Such a law was passed by Congress, but it was subsequently repealed, and in lieu thereof the pay of all noncommissioned officers and privates was increased two dollars a month, and all soldiers who receive an honorable discharge will be entitled to one hundred dollars as a reward for faithful services, or if killed in the battle or die befor...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Western Virginia. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Western Virginia. The Clarksburg correspondent of the Cincinnati Times thus sums up.lhe beneficial influence ot the war upon Western Virginia : "God tempers the wind to the shorn lambs," is a Bible truth. Western Virginia h;is been "shorn" in a moderate degree, but the "wind" of war lias been "tempered" with glory. It has been sown broadcast. Compared with the past tor nearly half a hundred yeiirs, it is a land flowing with milk and honey. Men who never yet saw enough ot American gold to delect the bogus from the genuine, jingle the bright eagles in their pockets with becoming pride and self-reliance. Never before have they been so prosperous. Cattle, which they were obliged to drive and ship long distances to market, are sold at their own doors. Provisions that were caned over mountain toads, and sold at a fraction above their cost, are taken at exnorbitant prices, and paid for in yellow gold. Fields have been occupied as encampments and fences burned to cook the supper of th...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Capitalists and the President. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Capitalists and the President. At the close ot the late session, in New York, of the Bank officers of the cities of New York, Boston and Philadelphia, and after they had perfected the negotiation whereby they placed fifty million dollars in the hands of the Government for the prosecution of the war, the following resolution was adopted, and sent to Washington: Resolved , That this meeting, in assuming, 'he grave responsibility of furnishing means to sustain the Government in this important crisis, beg leave respectfully to express to the President of the United States us confident expectation that the Government will, without respect to party or personal considerations, so conduct iu affairs in every department of administration, as to insure vigor, integrity, economy and efficiency to the triumphant termination of the war.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Burning ot Hampton.^ZW& [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The Burning ot Hampton.^ZW& Army officers who have long bean ac- I quainted with General "Magruder believe j that the burning of Hampton was ordered ! by him in a drunken frolic. He was al- I ways a hard drinker, and the taste has ! grown upon him since he beeame a rebel. < The attempt to attribute the rebel's dese- I cration of the Episcopal church at Centre- j ville to the National troops has reminded ; officers that one of the Fairfax churches ! was found, on the entrance of our corps, j to have evidently been used for barracks. The floor was knee-deep in straw, and i there were abundant signs of occupation by soldiers. t -

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Jeff. Davis on the Union. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Jeff. Davis on the Union. "This great country will continue united. Trifling politicians in the South or in the North, or in the West may talk otherwise, but it will be of no avail. They are like the musquitoes around the ox ; they annoy, but they cannot wound, and never kill." These were the words of Jeff. Davis, in an address, July 4th, 1801—and Gen. Scott proposes to show him that he was correct.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Garibaldi. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Garibaldi. A. letter from Turin, dated July 31, states that Garibaldi h%s no intention of coming hither,to take part in the battles for Freedom and the Union. But he wishes to organize a national subscription in Italy, as a tribute from one free nation to another—a return, in effect, for the liberality displayed by our citizens in the Italian war of 1859. _^ PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 22.—ED. CHRONICLE:—The "Christian Observer," the only rebel sympathizing journal in Philadelphia, was seized and stopped to-day by United States Marshal MUward.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
For the Blockade. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

For the Blockade. Thirteen vessels, seven of them steamers, carrying 2,000 men, are expected home within forty or fifty days, and will be added to the blockading force. The Brazil squadron, the frigate Congress and another is expected daily. The African squadron, three vessels, one the Mohican, equal to the Iroquois, should be here early in September. The China squadron a month later.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The American Question. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

The American Question. The Paris correspondent of the London Post—the government organ—asserts that the cabinets of England and France had become convinced that a serious conflict would take place in America, and that consequently they had entered into an active correspondence relative to the arrangement of a united plan of action, both by sea and land, towards this country. The writer adds that there was no doubt but a perfect understanding would be arrived at between the two Powers.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
From the London News. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

From the London News. "The defeat of the North shuts the door to compromise or to acquiesence on any terms ihe South can offer. The Union is bounc to conquer now. The spirit of New England and the Northwest will rise to the occasion ; and we of the old race, tried and strengthened by many reverses, shall not be surprised if our kinsmen never rest until they have turned defeat into victory." We hope so.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Sad News ffron the Choctaw Dli»8lona. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Sad News ffron the Choctaw Dli»8lona. We have seldom had to repott more discouraging news than is here given concerning the missions among the Choctaw Indians. The suspension of the mission school was mentioned in our last number as probable; this, we now learn, has taken place. Over four hundred interesting childien and young persons, lately enjoying the best kind of Christian instruction, are now deprived of this great advantage. Besides this, many of the missionary laborers have been compelled to leave the Indian country; some of them were ordered to leave by self-appointed "Vigilance Committees." consisting chiefly of lawless persons from Texas, joined by some ot the Indians.—Home and Foreign Record.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Secessionist Loses a Legacy. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

A Secessionist Loses a Legacy. Henry King, a wealthy resident of Allentown, Pa., died a few weeks since, leaving an estate valued at $300,000. He died childless. He was a brother of T. Butler King, one of the Commissioners of the Confederate States, now in Europe.— Mr. King had made a will, leaving half of his properly to his wife and the other half to his brother; but, a few weeks before his death, exasperated at the secession sentiments of his brother, he made a new will, leaving most of his property lo his wife, and to charitable purposes.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Singular Wound. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

A Singular Wound. The surgeon ot the hospital at Alexandria reports a singular case of suffering under his charge. A private, engaged in the battle at Bull Run, had a cannon ball pass his face without touching him. He felt a strong concussion of the air on his face as it whistled past; but, regaining his equilibrium, he continued in his place until after'the engagement, suffering severely however, wilh pain. His cheek soon presented a swolen appearance; with increase of pain. He was conveyed to the hospital and put under proper treatment, but the surgeons have had great difficulty in preventing mortification of the pins affected. Expeiienced army officers state that deaths frequently occur from balls passing without striking the victim.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Rozecraus said to be in Danger. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Rozecraus said to be in Danger. •Senator C'arlile, who has just arrived in Washington from Western Virginia, states that the rebel forces, under Lee had crossed Cheat river in two bodies, five thousand by the road from Staunton, and another body by the road from Lewisburg.— They were within fifteen miles of Gen. llozecraus' position, near Cheat Mountain Pass, which commands the two roads. It is reported, says a telegram to yester* day's Herald, by passengers arrived today from the west, by way of Harper's Ferry, that General Rozecrans .J with a small command, is in a precarious position in a mountain gap in the neighborhood of Big Spring, and that a rebel force had cut him off from water.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Why Gen. Iijon was not Re-Enforced. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

Why Gen. Iijon was not Re-Enforced. The St. Louis Democrat, in an article bearing testimony to the activity and energy of Gen. Fremont, says: That the army in the Southwest was not sooner re-enforced, we understand to be in no respect owing to any failure on the part of the Major-General commanding. Gen. Lyon's situation was fully laid before the War Department at Washington, and additional regiments were asked for. So few were the regiments at his disposal, that Gen. Fremont was compelled lo dispatch them all to important points that would otherwise he unprotected. In respect to this matter, however, a full investigation appears to be demanded by '.he country, and is certainly required in justice te all parties concerned.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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