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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LAW DEPARTMENT. MOOT COURT REPORTS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 November 1877

LAW DEPARTMENT. MOOT COURT REPORTS. MOOT COURT, I CASE 3. | RING ag'st RAILROAD COMPANY. The plaintiff, in the summer of 1876, was a workman in the employ of a contractor engaged by the defendants to perform certain work on a wall on their line ot railway in a dark tunnel. Trains were passing the place every ten minutes, and the line being there on a curve, the workmen could not know of the approach of a train until it was within twenty or thirty yards of them. The space between the rail and the wall on which the workmen stood while working was just sufficient to enable them to keep clear of a train, when aware of its approach. The place was entirely without light, and no one was stationed to give warning of an approaching train. The speed of the trains was not slackened when running near where the men were at work, nor was any signal given by whistling or otherwise. When the plaintiff had been there at work about a fortnight, he was reaching across the rail one day to find a tool, ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 November 1877

SHAVINGS. A CAMBRIDGE (England) theologue, when he told the story of the Good Samaritan, after reciting the benevolent man's promise to the host, " And when I come again I will re-pay thee," wound up with, " This he said, knowing that he should see his face no more." RECITATION in Evidence of Christianity. Prof. — "Mr. N , pass on to the Future Life;" Mr. N , —" Not prepared." AN old negro named Pete was very much troubled about his sins. "O, massa lam such a great sinner!" "But, Pete," said his master, "you are foolish to take it so much to heart." " I know de reason massa," said Pete ; " when you go duck hunting and kill one duck and wound another, don't you run after the wounded duck?" "Yes, Pete", wondering what was coming next. "Well, massa. Dat is de way with you and me; de debbil has got you sure ; but as he am not sure of me, he chases dis child all de time." A VERY Personal Pronoun. —Highlanders have the habit, when talking their English, such as it is, of interjecting the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, DECEMBER ist, 1877. No. 5. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, J. FISCHER, '7B) S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSON S, JR. '79C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79. Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00 Single copies, - - - - - 1 5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

CURRENT TOPICS. SINCE our last issue Harvard has answered though not accepted our challenge, having by their reply reversed our positions with respect to each other; making themselves the challengers and us the challenged party. They say they are willing to row us provided we do not include any members of the Law and Medical schools, except graduates of Columbia, thus reducing our force to about 500 in opposition to their 1000. Very kind of Harvard. Such terms as these would seem to indicate that they did not care to row us, and by these means hoped the challenge would fall. But on the contrary we learn that an informal vote of the boat club showed that the general feeling was in favor of racing. So we should judge that Harvard is perfectly willing to row, provided she caught a tolerably soft thing. We hope our boat club will not grasp anything too readily, and that that pluck which so strongly characterized our crew in former years will not this time force them to accept any terms ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

CORRESPONDENCE. THE STUDY OF HISTORY. Mr. Spectator : WILL you allow me a brief space in your valuable columns to call the attention of all whom it may concern to the present method of teaching history at Columbia? I do not refer to Roman and Grecian history, which the Freshmen and Sophomores formerly recited to Prof. Schmidt, and forgot as soon as it had been-recited, but what I would bring to the notice of your readers is the lact, that the time allowed for the study of Mediaeval and Modern History is altogether too limited. In the brief space of eight months —in about sixty hours, the Sophomores are expected to hear lectures and recite on the whole history of the world from A. D., 500 to the present time —including the all important subject of English History. It is true, Dr. Quackenbos uses this limited time to the very best advantage, and certainly manages to teach more than most other professors would under the circumstances, but this does not abolish the defect. What is neede...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
FOOT BALL. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

FOOT BALL. COLUMBIA VS. STEVENS. T N spite of former protestations to the contrary, we 1 played Stevens once again on Tuesday. Oct. 13th. The weather and ground were both good, and the only draw-back we knew of was the absence of some of our best players. The teams were : Stevens. Forwards-.—Hazard, capt., Rosenberg, Suydam, Burchardt. Half-backs ; Nicholls, Zimmerman, Denton, Dashiell. Backs fMorton, Jardine. Columbia. Forwards; Brower, capt.. Pryor, Ridabock, Livingston, Train. Halt-backs; Conover, Randall, Burton, Brinckerhoff. Backs ; Morgan and Drowne. Stevens winning the toss, chose the goal by the club house, and at 3:30, the ball was set in motion by Brower. It was immediately borne to the enemy s goal, and in the space of ten minutes they were lorced to touch for safety four times. Then Stevens got hold ot the leather, and we in turn, were obliged to touch for safety twice. ' But Randall and Train, through some excellent playing, soon whisked it back again, and Stevens had ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COLLEGE MORALITY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

COLLEGE MORALITY. 11 'Tis the first virtue vices to abhor, And the first wisdom to be fool no more." —Pope. THIS is a season marked by innovations in our college world. Everyone is suggesting some kind of a change, while our respected professors are amused, if not edified. By the numerous barks Against studies and marks, Which the infant SPECTATOR is raising. Perhaps this would be a good time to set the ball rolling in the direction of the character and actions of students themselves. When we consider the hopes and anticipations ol the fond parent in sending his son to college, the high character of the course there pursued, including such studies as the satires of Juvenal and others against vice and corruption, the Christian-like doctrines of Socrates and Plato, Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences ot Natural and Revealed Religion, Cicero on Old Age, Friendship, and Moral Duties, and a score of other works,— all expounded by professors ol noble qualities, —it seems almost incredi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

OUR EXCHANGES. The Bowdoin Orient presents an article on music which does not show an extensive acquaintance with the history of music. Yet it concludes very truly that " Wherever music dwells there dwells with it culture and refinement." The arrangement and general appearance of the paper are all that could be desired. The Galaxy, for December, contains an article entitled " The Truth about the Strike," Which presents quite an exhaustive essay on the Great Strike, by one who has traveled over the ground in person. There is another paper on "The Administration of Abraham Lincoln,'' by Hon. Gideon Welles. Also, "The ThreeStory Story of a Box," by James G. Austin ; " Before the Mirror," by Paul H. Hayne ; " The Youth of Charles Sumner," by Lucy C. White; " Grotesque," a poem, by Emma Lazarus ; " Max and Myself," by Alice Sinslee ; " The Suburbs of London," by Henry James, Jr. ; "A Dream of Anglo-Saxondom," by J. E. Chamberlain ; " The Golden Age," a poem, by William Preston Johnston ;...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

ABOUT COLLEGE. MR. F. A. SCHEMERHORN, '6B, has been elected a member of the Board of Trustees, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. J. W. Beekman. This is a step in the right direction, and we hope that this infusion of new life into the Board will have the / effect of stirring up some of its latent energy. ALL the college catalogues, some fifteen hundred in number, had to be sent back to the printer's, on account of the ludicrous statement that Prof. Burgess was "Professor of History, Political Silence (!) and International Law." AT a recent meeting of the Freshman class, a Sophomore named Hubbard made a long speech, setting forth the various advantages that would accrue from wearing those frightful absurdities, the cap and gown. He ended by gravely recommending the class to patronize a friend of his who is a well-known haberdasher. DR. S., AUSTIN PEARCE, the conductor of the Glee Club, has commenced a course of six lectures on practical harmony. Dr. Pearce is a graduate ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." Editorial Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

IN "THE MINES." Editorial Notes. AFTER many years of patient collecting, a valuable scientific library has been gathered for the School of Mines around a nucleus taken from the college library. It now contains some seven thousand volumes, including full sets of the numerous scientific journals, and proceedings of the various learned bodies, and files of nearly one hundred technical papers are kept for reference. Yet this precious library, which should be of so much aid to the students is practically "regulated out of their reach." The four classes have their time (By-Law 34) occupied in the different laboratores from 10 a. m. to 4p. m. There, work is assigned them, which must be performed. The library (By-Law 26) is open from 9:30 a. m. to 4 p. m. Works which the students need the most, such as expensive Technical Dictionaries, Cyclopaedias, etc., are prohibited from being removed at all. (By-Law 30) Students pursuing post graduate courses are entirely debarred from its privileges, ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst : The trustees, at their autumn meeting, appropriated $5OO for the introduction of gas into the Walker and Williston buildings. The Amherst athletes have been too much occupied with base-ball and foot-ball this autumn to engage in other games. The Student is not sent to THE SPECTATOR with much regularity. Boston University:--The Aggie Base-Ball Nine, unable to find worthy opponents, have suspended operations for the season. The new propagating house is nearly ready for use. At a recent meeting of the Athletics it was voted to have no exhibition this fall, but to give the necessary money to the Ball Association. The "Maine Delegation" in the Law School have organized an association called the Maine Law Students' Club. The junior class, in the School of Oratory, is the largest that ever entered the school, numbering fifty. Bowdoin : The Brown Prize for Extemporaneous English Composition, has, through the generosity of its former donor, been re-established. T...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place at the Academy of Music on Saturday evening, the 24th ult., before a large and select audience. The orchestra is, this year, under the direction of Mr. Thomas, whose leadership will only increase-the high reputation which the Society's qpncerts have hitherto enjoyed. The first concert was a success in every respect. The programme comprised the overture to "Le deux Journees," the Pastoral Symphony of Beethoven, selections from " Manfred," a beautiful suite for the piano and orchestra by Raff, and "Mazeppa," a new symphonic poem by Liszt. Mr. S. B. Mills was the soloist of the evening, and, it is needless to add, played the very difficult " suite " with his usual elegance, force, and precision. The symphony, however, showed the capabilities of the orchestra to the greatest advantage. Nothing could exceed the exquiste rendering of the Andante, which was only equalled by that of the " Invocation of the Alpine ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

THE LIBRARY. HOLIDAY BOOKS. I. THE season of " Merry Christmas " again draws nigh, and the publishers are not slow in reminding the public that "books are the best holiday presents." This fact, usually displayed in capital letters in every book-shop, is certainly a truth. Nothing can be more appropriate for a gift to an educated friend than a choice copy of some standard author, or one of the illustrated holiday volumes which remain an ornament to the shelf or the centre-table throughout the year. It becomes our duty, of course, to call the attention of our peculiar public to the attractions of this year's list of new books, and in doing so, we only regret that our limited space forbids our noticing even the best books at that length which their merits would seem to require. Moreover, in this number, as m our next, we can notice at all only a few of the very best works that the publishers offer. MissS. H. Leggett, 1184 Broadway, has published a volume entitled "Golden Songs of Great...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 December 1877

SHAVINGS. PRESIDENT in Polit. Economy Class—" You know, Mr. S., that there was a fall in the price of whiskey a year or so ago." Mr. S. (anxious to remove suspicion) —"Oh, no, Mr. President! I didn't know anything about it!" SOPH, (howling on lower floor) —" What fellow do those feet, at the top of the stairs, belong to ? " Prof, (from top of stairs)—" Gentlemen, have you forgotten the rules about noises in the halls during recitation hours ? " JUNIOR —" I'll bet you can't-repeat the Lord's Prayer." Soph.—"l'll bet you five dollars I can." Junior—"! take the bet; proceed." Soph.—Now I lay me down to sleep—" Junior —"There, there ! the the money is yours ; 1 didn't think you knew it." PROF, (in Italian class reading Dante) —" We are now fairly in hell,"- Student on back seat (whose mind has been wandering) recovers himself with a start. PROF, in Political Economy—" I know that in the absence of Prof. you have had a—a—" Class — " Soft time." Prof. —" Ye-es." "SAY, what are you paying ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. II NEW YORK, DECEMBER 15th, 1877. No. 6. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLES, '7B, Editor-in-Chief,, J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79. W. B. PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00 Single copies, - - - - - - \ 5 cts. Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

CURRENT TOPICS. ee "jV/TERRY CHRISTMAS," is our salutation to our readers with this number, though the joyful festival, and above all, the enjoyable vacation are distant yet by one week, when this number is published Nevertheless, as usual, the prospective vacation casts its shadow before, consisting in a general impatience with even the best lectures—not to speak of the eternity which seems to be contained in the hours devoted to Greek or antiquities. We do not know whether there is any truth in the oft-repeated statement, that more study is accomplished between October and Christmas than during the rest of the year, but we are strongly inclined to believe that there is. January is notoriously devoted to " cramming," February to the examination and some needed rest, March and April witness a revival, while May finds the Harlem River and the concluding examination struggling with equal powers in the minds of the students. However this may be, and certainly a different plan is pursue...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
FOOT BALL. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

FOOT BALL. YALE VS. PRINCETON. THE long delayed Yale-Princeton loot-ball match, for the college championship, took place at the St. George's Cricket Club grounds, Hoboken, on Saturday Dec. Bth. The day was an excellent due lor the sports and between 2000 and 30 00 spectatois including many ladies, had gathered to witness what promised to be the most important game of the season. As Yale had accepted to all of Princeton's demands, both colleges were represented by teams ot 15 men. By a special agreement before the match, it was resolved to decide the game by goals only, and not to count touchdowns. The teams were as tollows : Yale. Forwards Wurts, Lamb, Harding. O. W. Brown, Camp, Ives, Peters, Smith. Half-backs ;F. W. Brown, Clark, Thompson, Downer. Backs; Baker, (capt)., Waitman, Trumbull. Princeton. Forwards;—Wiley, Enos, Lee, Devereaux, Loney, Clark, Ballard, Stevenson, Bradford. Half-backs ; Dodge, (capt)., McNair, Irving. Backs ; Cutts, Minor, Funkhauser. Princeton won the toss...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE MARKING SYSTEM. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

THE MARKING SYSTEM. CHAPTER 11. " O, ever thus from childhood's hour I've seen my fondest hopes decay ! I never had a dog, nor cow, or Hen, that laid an egg a day, But what was MARKED and tuck away !" "I am shaved, plucked, scaled, pumice-stoned, bedecked, polished up and painted." (Lucilius, Book VII.) IT is with great fear and trembling that the undersigned would respectfully enter again upon the discussion of this momentous problem,—that question on which the happiness of so many millions depends, and which is to stamp its character on future tens of millions. At present the murmurs of an enlightened youth are beginning to reverberate from the Atlantic on the East to the Pacific on the West, and the American Eagle perched on the pinnacle of the North Pole gazes earnestly through the transit at his daughter, Columbia, ever and anon pausing to wipe away a tear, or make allowances for instrumental errors. Methinks as I write, he smiles to cheer me on in my hazardous undertaking. The...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

CORRESPONDENCE. BASE BALL. Mr. Spectator WHILE other colleges have their base-ball nines, and play frequent matches during the spring and fall, Columbia has none. Why is this ? Is not base-ball as pleasant a game as foot-ball ? In my estimation it is more pleasant and better exercise. Foot-ball is a mere matter of wind and skill in dodging. But in base-ball much more skill is needed to bat the ball in the right place, and to throw it to the right man, than is required to dodge a few men in front of you. It requires a greater amount of courage to stand up to the bat than is required for anything in foot-ball. The last game played by a strictly college nine took place on Prospect Park in the spring of '76 against New York University. A year later the Sophomore nine went to New Brunswick, and played a match against Rutgers. Besides these there have been two or three class-matches. What a beggarly array in comparison with other colleges. A few men, principally Juniors, went up to Melros...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 December 1877

OUR EXCHANGES. THE College Echo (C. C. N. Y.) is generally a good and sensible paper. The more are we astonished at the nonsense contained in the Exchange columns of the November number. In a notice of I HE SPECTATOR we are told, to our astonishment, that " the splitting of the Senior class of Columbia into two opposing factions, each claiming to be the true class, has evidently given birth to this new journal." This will be news to the founders of our journal, a majority of whom are not members of the class at all. Furthermore we flatter ourselves, that our first number gave no uncertain sound as to our position in " class politics." We are somewhat astonished that the " SPECTATOR" should be looked upon as belonging to the feminine gender, but our Echo friends speak of it as " she." In conclusion we are asked "How long has Columbia been a University?" If our friends will look into a good cyclopaedia, they will find that Columbia was chartered as a university in May, 1784, about a h...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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