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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 ity, retirement, silonco, occupation; this is the program drawn up by Saint Ber edict for all those who have enrolled themsolvos under his standard. Piety which requires that wo servo God with all the tender affection and confidence of a son for the best of Fathers. Piety which requires that we spend long hours in holy commun ion with the Author of our days. Piety which closes our oars against all vain discourses which Saint Paul demands that wo may ho free to converse with heaven. "Ut nostra convcrsatio in cozlis sit." The child of St. Bonedict must livts with God under a superior a superior who is God's representative, conse quently there can be no more individual liberty or independence. He must no more think, wish, judge, save and ex cept after and according to the will expressed or understood of his superior. It matters little whethor his superior be a man of ordinary or extraordinary virtue; whether he be learned or unlet tered, refined or vulgar. Under...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. at the side of the corpse. This was the origin of the present "Officium Defunctorum," the "Office for the dead." But what is the "Office for the Dead?" Thus many of our readers may well inquire, since the office is for the greatest part, unknown to the faithful. Former ly, especially in the first centuries of Christianity it was not so. At that time the laity wore familiar with the psalms the chief part of the Office in fact, knew them largely by Heart. St. Jerome testifies to this fact with regard to the faithful living in and around Bethlehem: "Whithersoever you turn', you hear the husbandman at his plow chanting the divine praises. ' The harvester, laboring in the sweat of his brow is cheered by singing the psalms and the vino grower, trimming the branches with his sickle, repeats the hymns of David. Such are the songs heard in this country. They are the joy of the shepherd and the implements of agriculture. In those days the "Divine Office" was chanted ei...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 of pious sentoncos, antiphons, vorsiclos and responses, mostly taken from the Sacred Scriptures, of prayers and re ligious hymns. It' is divided into various parts, called hours, because they are assigned to different hours of the day, so that the entire day and night and all time is hallowod by this prayer. The first division is into the Office of the day and the Office of the night or the diurnal and nocturnal office. The further division of these parts is govern ed by the ancient method of reckoning the hours of the day. In tho first centuries of Christianity it was custom ary to reckon the day from sunriso to sunset. Tho hour from six to seven was the first hour, 9 o'clock the third hour, midday the sixth and 3 o'clock the ninth hour of the day. Thus the parts of the diurnal Office were named after these hours: "Prime, Tierce, Sext, Non," which signify in English, "First, Third, Sixth and Ninth." The night was divided by tho ancients after the military cu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1893

84. TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. them 0 Lord and let perpetual light shine upon them." A further characteristic feature to this Office is the manner in which the suppliant impersonates the holy souls; they borrow his tongue and voice and through him and with him they appeal to the merciful God; even the readings are in the form of such intercessory prayer, much more the constant con cluding prayer: "Eternal rest, etc., the versicles and responses, and the orations." "Wo shall give special at tention however to this feature, when we come to explain the individual parts. The Office for the Dead dates its ori gin from the most ancient times of the Church. Durandus, whose work on the "Divine Office" is a standard for all times, is of the opinion that it was in troduced even by the apostles. "When and how often is the Office for the Dead to be said? The Church remembers the holy souls in every Mass and in every "hour" of the divine office. She has assigned the place of honor in holy Mass to the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VI. JANUARY 1894. No. 1. CHRISTHAS DAY. Lot this day sec nil wrongs forgiven, Let peace sit crowned in every heart, Let bitter words be left unsaid, Let each one take his brother's part; Let sad lips learn to smile A day is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! Let rich and poor together meet, While words of kindness fill the air. Let love spread roses ii) the way, Though winter reignoth everywhere. Let us know naught of craft or guile, A day is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! Let us help each with loving care, Our brother on the way to heaven, Let's lay aside all selfishness. Let pride from every heart be driven, Let Christmas Day bring many a smile. A day is such a little while! Of all days, this is the shortest! A Simple Act That Foretold the Greatness of Three Hen. In Paris, in 1841, on a cold, foggy Christmas evo, a street violinist, old and shabby, was making his wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of his plan, Charles said : "Wo will finish with the trio from 'William Toll.'" The trio began. The old musician, who had all this time stood motionless, suddenly drew himself up to his full height, seized his stick and began beating time with such masterly precision that the young singers gather ed fresh inspiration and fairly electrified their hearers. Charles was kept busy picking up the coins. The crowd dispersed slowly when the concert was over, and the old man, in a voice that trembled, exclaimed: "Tell me your names, that my daughter may remember you in her prayers." ''My name is Faith," said the first artist. "And mine is Hope," said the second. "Then I am Charity," added the third, bringing up the hat, which was overflowing with money. The old man told them he was Chappner, once leader of the orchestra in Stras bourg, whore "William Tell" was often given. He blessed the three young students and wound up his grateful speech with the words: "I predict tha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. victims. Confiding them to the care of tho old men of their tribe, thoy walked away, humming the refrain of one of their death-songs, which was suggested by the feast that awaited them. Tho vigilant guardians smoked and chatted of their feats in the chase and on tho hattlefiold, ever and anon casting angry glances toward the gentle cap tives. At length, thinking the maidens asleep, thoy gave themselves up to a profound repose. The prisoners, after hours of fervent prayer, and by recall ing the lessons of faith they had learned from the Blackrobo, had succeeded in resigning themselves to their awful fate. "Our death may convert our father," suggested Snowflake. "And if Redfeather learns the Black robe's prayer and is baptized, our whole nation will embrace the Christian faith. The afllicted Mother stood at the foot of tho cross; we are her children, and must try to imitate her," murmured Wildbird. With words like these the two prison ers encouraged each other, an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I more, thou must forgive. The Grout Spirit is the spirit of peace, unci will bo deaf to my supplication if thou dost cherish anger in thy inmost heart." "Father, I believt, and we swear to abide by thy words." "Chief, I trust thou art sincere that no lie lurks in thy heart. May the Great Spirit be merciful to thee and grant thy petition." In the grey of the early morning Father de Smet was standing at the altar, but before beginning the holy sacrifice of the Mass, ho informed the Rev. Fathers and Brothers of the danger to which the young Christian disciples were exposed, and explained what a loss the lives of these exemplary maidens would be to their little mission. He also told them of Redfeather's solemn promise to influence his nation to embrace the true faith. Then all present renewed their fervent prayers that God would show his power, and promote His own greater glory by deli vering the captives. Meantime the two maidens were a prey to involuntary dread o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the Blackfoet, and were returning homo with their mother, Ray-of-Morning. Snowflako and Wildbird were soon in the embrace of their overjoyed father, and all the followers of the Blackrobes knelt to bless and thank the Great Spirit. Before the end of the moon of August, the men and women of- the fierce Dako tas had gathered around the mission house in circular rows of wigwams. With solemn faces they listened to the truths and precepts of the Gospel as explained by the Jesuits. To forgive their enemies was indeed a hard lesson to poor children of nature, whilst to re turn good for evil seemed to them impossible. But God's mercy is all sullicient, and it was so abundantly bestowed that on the recurring feast of St. Michael, in honor of the deliverer of the doves of their fold, nearly all were made? children of the Great Spirit by the saving waters of baptism. But, 0 my God! I wish tho most Thut my poor heart may bo A homo all holy for each Host That comes in love t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, U J There are no tears like a mother's tears, nothing to so restrain a mind wandering into evil paths. The man who looks back ovor his childhood and youth, regrets nothing so much as that ho brought tears of sorrow and sadness to a fond mother's eyes. Every tear a mother sheds over a wayward child is recorded in the great book, and he shall answer for it. INDIANS IN THE BOY'S TOWN. If they could, the boys would rather have been Indians than anything else, but as there was really no hope of this whatever, they were willing to be settlers, and fight the Indians. They had rather a mixed mind about them in the meantime, but perhaps they were not unlike other idolators in both fearing and adoring their idols; per haps they came pretty near being Indi ans in that, and certainly they came nearer than they . knew. The boys lived in the desire, if not the hope, of some time seeing an Indian, and they made the most of the Indians in the circus, whom they knew to be just...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. HANS AND FRITZ. I Inns and Frit- were two Deutshers who lived side by side, Remote from the world, its deceit and itn pride; With their pretzels and beer their spare moments were spent, And the fruits of their labor were peace and content Hans purchased a borne of a neighbor one day, And lacking a part of the Geldm they say -Made a call upon Fritz to solicit a loan To help him to pay for his beautiful roan. Fritz kindly consented the money to lend, And gave the required amount to his friend; Komarking, his own simple language to quote "Berhaps it vas potter vo make us a note," The note was drawn up in their primitive way 'I, Hans, gets from Fritz feefty tollars to-day;" "When the question arose, the note being made, "Vieh von holds dot baper until it vas baid?" ' You geops dot," says Fritz, "und den you vill know You owes me dot money." Says Hans, "dot ish so; Dot makes me remempers J haf dot to bay, Und 1 prings you dor note und dor money some day." A month had...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and swindle the whole proceeding has been." It is expected that the Kickapoo Reservation will be opened early this coming spring. It is a body of land of some two hundred thousand (200,000) acres, 25,000 of which, or thereabout, is to be alloted to t'ho Indians; the rest to be sold to the whites at the price of thirty-two or thirty-five cents an acre (if we are well informed). This extra ordinary cheap bargain, coupled with the fact that the Kickapoo country is simply a magnificent park, a .land far better than any of the Cherokee strip, is sure to bring about a greater compe tition, a larger crowd proportionately, a more eager run, and a greater amount of fraud than was .witnessed at the opening of the strip. There is a sad and suspicious feature about the whole transaction by which this land became the property of the United States. The Kansas City Star, a paper very little in sympathy with the Indians, gives the following account of the whole affair: "In th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9 noticed in the group a young squaw of about twenty-four years of age, who was horriblv disfigured. Tier nose had been entirely cut off. I thought at first that the poor creature had met with some sad accident, fallen victim to some loathsome disease, or that she had been stung by some venomous insect, scor pion, tarantula, or other; and expressed my opinion to the agent's wife. But she laughed heartily at my simplicity. "Oh, no!" she said, "it "was no disease that deprived this woman of her nose, nor was it the sting of a scorpion, or of n tarantula, it was something else that brought her to grief;" and then she explained to me that it was the custom in the Comanche nation that every woman who proved herself unfaithful to her husband had this kind of punishment inflicted on her. "This is the case of the young squaw," she added. "Her husband found her in fault, and, to punish her, used his right and cut off her nose. As long as she lives she will remember her f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

10 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. versos and disappointments, it is true, frequently teach the American this dis cipline of respect and obedience, but it is then regarded as a hard lesson and it is one that is usually learned with much bitterness of feeling. The major ity of young Americans know nothing of respect for authority. But, however, this may be in secular things, the Catholic, the American Catholic, as well as others, is held to respect the authority of the Church and to obey it. To most men it is not any easy task to lead a virtuous life. The world is very attractive and good natured, and not at all exacting. But the Catholic in his baptism has re nounced the world, and has given himself to the Church of Christ. The Church seems very unreasonable at times. There are certain secret so cieties, for example, which offer ex cellent advantages to those who join Ihem pleasant acquaintance, fancy ceremonies, business connections, and the like. And yet .the Church says: "No; you must not j...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 cede with the king in bohalf of the colonics. He was not successful, and had begun to despair. One morning he was sitting in the waiting room of the king's palace, looking downhearted and forsaken, for he had received a letter from Washington, saying if Franco did not send over her army, the cause must fail, for his troops were commencing to mutiny, and he could not raise funds to pay them; they had no rations and their feet were on the ground and cut and bleeding from the cold. Franklin, looking down-cast and woe-begone, was revolving Washington's last official let ter in his philosophical mind, when he was aroused from his melancholy stupor by a voice calling: "Mr. Franklin! Oh, Mr. Franklin!" Franklin jumped up. It was the Pope's nuncio, who con tinued: "I have good news for you. I have just got the promise of the king to send over a French army and navy to aid your countrymen." Franklin, much astonished, clasped the hand of the nuncio. "Oh!" he said, " co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

jdt IS THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TMq Indian jXdVoCate Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give n history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, n history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Tost Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Approved iiy Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCIIAERT, Vicar Apostolic ok Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Subscriptions W Cents per Year. Slnylc Copies 15 Cents. JANUARY 1894. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. To all its readers the Indian Advo cate wishes a Happy New Year. Hap piness ! can there bo such a tiling on ear...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. IS More than two thousand American Indians were received into the Catholic Church last year. On the third Sunday of Advent, Rev. Reynolds was raised to the sublime dig nity of the priesthood by the Rt. Rev. Vicar Apostolic of the Indian Territory. During the Russian fetes at Paris, a cuirassier was unhorsed in the Place des Invalidcs and severely injured. Car dinal Richard, the Archbishop of Paris, who was passing, stopped his carriage, helped to lift the wounded man, and gave him his own vehicle to take him to the hospital. No wonder there were cries of "Long live the Cardinal!" Some years ago, there appeared a car toon in which Bismarck was represented at the door of St. Peter's, a rope tied around the cross upon the dome, and the Iron Chancellor pulling on it with all his might. Satan appeared on the scene and asked Bismarck what he was trying to do. "I am trying to pull down the Cross and upset this Church," replied Bismarck. "I wish you luck with your work,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. mental rubbish be pushed out of place. It is better, as many parents have learned by sad experience, to keep a boy and a boy's friends under your eyes, than to care for parlcr carpets and such like. If it is a question between mere decoration and the boy's presence at home after dark, give the parlor carpet to the poor. This radical measure, however, is not in all cases necessary; boys and their chums arc not so very dreadful when you under stand them, and they have been known to amuse themselves without chipping the marble-topped table or using the mirrors for foot-balls. By all means, keep the children at home these winter nights, and bind them together with the Rosary. What we need above all things in this country is family union, family life. Given cheerful, Christian homes, and there need be no fear for the future of the Church in the United States. How few fathers are really heads of their families nowadays ? Children are often so many creatures to be fe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. IS an entertainment for your friends, not to exceed your means. 7. Ilavo the courage to do without that which you do not need, however much your eyes may covet it. 8. Have the courage to acknowledge your ignorance, rather than to seek knowledge under false pretenses. 9. Have the courage to speck to a friend in" a seedy coat, even though you are in company with a rich friend, and richly attired. 10. Have the courage to speak your mind when it is necessary that you should do so, and to hold your tongue when it is prudent for you to do so. 11. Have the courage to show your respect for honesty, in whatever guise it appears, and your contempt for dis honesty and duplicity, by whomsoever exhibited. 12. Have the courage to cut the most agreeable acquaintance you have when you are convinced that he lacks principle; a friend should bear with a friend's infirmities, but not with his vices. 4 Thousand and One Objections to Secret Societies." This is the title of a now, pop...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1894

16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. concluded; but when his father learned that I was financially ruined, he oppos ed the match. My daughter was both pious and dignified, but her father's penetrating eye could not fail to observe that she was sorely grieved. My wife showed greater courage (as a rule, though they appear weak, women bear trouble with more fortitude than men). However, though she tried hard to conceal her sorrow, she went to consult a fortune-teller.' ' ''Excuse me, did your wife tell you what the mountebank said?" "The fellow said nothing but non sense. The only real thing in the whole affair was the ten-franc fee. "I disposed of my shares in the bank, and was going to pay up, when one evening a priest entered the office, and asked to speak to me. 'Haye you not lost some money?' he inquired. 'Yes,' I replied, trembling nervously; 'on the fifth of last month, between twelve and four o'clock in the after noon, I lost, or rather forgot somewhere ten bank-notes, each of a thousand fr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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