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Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 9. Prospects. That hop-picking machine, if it realizes, and will do the woik of twenty-five men, will go far toward solving the labor ques tion in the irrigated region. In the Yakima valley, probably as a type of other sections, cheap labor for the hop harvest is a real necessity. Yet the com ing of hundreds and thousands of poor folk from the sound cities is hardly a blessing to the country, and the short season of employment and the long dis tance to travel makes the opportunity but a moderate benefit to those employed. It is claimed that the new machine will save four cents a pound to the grower. We warrant it a welcome on the Yakima —if it will do the work. It seems likely, judging from the tone of the newspapers of the state, that no state fair will be held in Oregon in 1894. If so this is Washington's opportunity to capture a lift from the outside, and extra inducements should ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

2 $3,000. Certainly a very moderate outlay for so important an industry. There Should be no difficulty whatever in get tidg stock subscribed for a company with two or three times as much capital. The committee in charge will proceed imme diately to secure pledges from fruit men and farmers for supplies of such a char acter that the cannery and evaparator may be kept in operation throughout the entire season from May (strawberry time) to December, after which the starch fac tory department, if money is raised to establish that also, might go to work on the potato crop and so keep the works in operation the whole year around. Walla Walla has "taken the bull by the horns," or, as an hibernian would have it, proposes to kill the insects before they are born. The folks down there have instituted a firey boycott against all fruit trees brought from east of the Rocky mountains. Hold on, gentlemen! Look out that you don't cut yourselves off from the opportunity of enriching lines of val uab...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

been buying many boxes at 75 cents. With the better prices at eastern and southeastern points it looks as though buying and shipping Yakima apples would prove a paying business just now. It should cost no more, or very little more, to ship to Denver, Omaha and Kan sas City from North Yakima and other points along this portion of the N. P. line, than from Baker City. Wet Wheat Rates. The Northern Pacific directory has noti fied the traffic department that the 18fc rate on wet wheat from the Palouse coun try, which was to expire on the 17th, has been extended to April 15, which will be welcome news to holders who have been unable so far to get their product to the de pots. North Yakima Lumber Market. The stocks of lumber on hand at the North Yakima yards are not large but sufficient o meet the demand as new shipments are arriving daily from the Sound region. We quote the following as the retail rates. Rough and sized, per M $ 13 00 No. 2 flooring and rustic.... 16 00 No. 1 flooring an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

4 THE INTERVIEWER. C. P. Wilcox Tells Ranch Readers How to Make a Lawn—Preparing Ground, Dyk ing. Flooding, Seeding, Mowing—Judge Stout Teaches Tenderfeet to Sprout Sweet Potatoes-Two Most Useful In terviews. I was looking over Old Sagebrush's "Wayside Notes" this morning and no ticed his very pertinent remarks about the home surroundings, and the thought occurred to me that "How to Make a Lawn" would be a very useful item for this department of The Ranch. In one of my walks about town I had noticed on the bench west of the city a lawn of re markable beauty and perfection ; at least, though brown and sere at this date, I could imagine its perfection and beauty when spring time revives the latent life of the sward. Enquiry revealed that the place is owned by President C. P. Wilcox of the Yakima County horticultural society and I lost no time in seeking him out and gleaning his method of lawn cre ating. Mr. Wilcox, said the scribe, when did you begin making your magnificent lawn? The ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

To Start an Early Garden. It is high time that seeds for the early vegetables were in the ground. A tight board fence running east and west will force the season by two weeks or irore for things planted on its south side. But for tiie tender species, like tomatoes, melons, cucumbers, peppers, egg plant, etc., as well as the flowering plant?, more shelter is needed. Early cabbages must also be included in the list. As a cheap and easy way, we quote Ira W. Adams' method from the Pacific Rural Tress: "Take a drj'-goods box, three or four feet long, two feet wide and two feet or more in depth. A much larger one can be used if neces sary. Into this I put fresh horse man ure, and straw that has been used for bedding, and tramp it down occasionally as solid as possible, until it is within four inches from the top. Over this 1 scatter a little clean straw. I then use small boxes, three inches deep, and fill them nearly full with nicely prepared soil, and after sowing my seed, place each box...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

6 DAIRY TIPS. A creamery should not be started until 300 cows are guaranteed. Stunting the calf's growth is running into debt for the future. No calf should be raised for dairy pur poses from a cow of weak constitution or one with organic disease. You can prevent a cow's kicking by buckling a strap tightly around the body just forward of the udder. Uncleanliness in milking, not cooling the milk quickly after milking, bad fod der, bad air in stables and disease in cows are causes of tainted milk. Jersey cows surprised their owners, even, in the cheese test at Chicago, in that they produced the largest product in competition with the Guernseys and Shorthorns. CREAMERY NEWS. Whatcom county proposes to have sev eral separators in operation this year. Elberton farmers had pledged 300 cows ten days ago, and it was claimed that twice as many could be secured easily. Perhaps the way of ways to embark in the creamery business is for several local ities each to have a separator and unite in t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

THE PROFESSORS TALK. The Pullman Agricultural college pro fessors conducted a farmers' institute at Guy, on March 10. The opening address was made by President Bryan. Professor Elton Fulmer spoke on sugar beet culture, Miss Annie Howard read a paper on "A Garden of Annuals," and Professor Charles V. Piper addressed the meeting on grain smuts. On the same day an institute was held at Mosco, the seat of the Idaho Agricultural college. Professor Aldrich read a paper on spraying, and Professor Henderson on our forestry. Sj great has been the demand for the recent college bulletin on modes of destroying the ground squirrel from farm ers in "the southern part of Idaho that it is estimated that a thousand additional copies would hardly supply it. ■ , f% ■ Gold ana Silver Walehes, Rle/eles, At I Ufinn Tricycles, UiiiisßudM»tols,(;ar*t HI -—- ril.H Bugirles,WaKoiis,Carrlase»,Kufe* f fit 4 I I IUU Sleigh., Harness, Cart lops, Skids, Sewing Machines, Aceordeons, Organs, Pianos, Cider Mills, Ca...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

8 THE RANCH a Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It. Prick —$1.00 a year, in advance. WOHTH —Two gold dollars. Conducted by K. B. Lin by. Managing Editor, W. W. Cobmtt. EDITOKIAL OFFICKS: NOKTII YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. BUBINISB offices: North Yakima, cor. Second and Chestnut sts Seattle, Room 7. Hiuckley Block. Taeoma. 1118, Pacific Avenue. Don't forget that experimental plat of sugar beets. Send to Prof. Elton Fulmer, Pullman, Wash., for the seeds. They will be sent you free of charge with full instructions for planting and care of the crop. Upon these tests will depend the location of a factory in your midst. This applies not only to the Yakima country, but also to every farm ing community in the state of Washington. RANCH SMALL TALK. Why not ask all of your neighbors to try a two-bit subscripticn (3 months) to The RANCH ? Will you get up the club ? Fast walking horses will of course be down for goodly premium at the state fair. They are a heap more important than trotters to th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

WAYSIDE NOTES. Duck-Foot Jealousy-Alfalfa Called "Bum Clover"—Old Brindle's Testimony—The Garden Seen From the Kitchen Win dow—Mrs. S. B. R. and Her Brood to Have First Consideration—Doctor's Sa lutes Better Than His Visits—Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Bad Paving for Death to Walk on. By nu Old Sugebrush Rooster. I was taking in the Sound country the other week and stopped a day in one of the most famous grazing and dairy valleys of that portion of the state. My chance acquaintance, you see I always manage to get a "note" out of about every wayside man I meet, was a great stickler for the clover and timothy of his valley, and he told noe of some wonderful yields of mead ows and pastures. Four to five tons of hay per acre, and cows standing in the pastures as thick as hay cocks in the meadows; milk flowing like water in our garden laterals, and cream thick, sweet and rich as taffy at a "candy pull." I mildly hinted at our ten-ton alfalfa as be ing a pretty good thing to have around a ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

1 O Potato growers in the east have reduced the work on the potato crop to a nice degree. For many years, planting hy machinery was a difficult problem. But some years ago it was successfully solved by the invention and perfection of the ASPINWALL POTATO PLANTER, of which in operation we give an illustration above. We know this machine well by reputation, and it is a practical success. On the smooth and light soils of irrigated lands, it would be a great aid in putting in the big acreage. The Pacific coast agents for this planter are the Frank Brothers' Implement Co.. of Portland, and we understand that John Sawbridge, of North Yakima, will have it in stock. YAKIMA COUNTY HORTICULTURAL SO- CIETY. At the Horticultural society meeting last Saturday interest centered chiefly in the discussion of a proposition by Mr. Scudder to establish a cannery for utiliz ing the surplus fruits and vegetables of the section tributary to North Yakima. It was proposed also to start in connection with i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

POULTRY RANCH. LOur Poultry Editor is Harry 11. Collier, No. 9">o 0 St.. Tacoma. Address him on all Poultry matters. 1 "We care nothing for the man who can furnish egt?s only when any fool can fur nish them —when uncared-for liens have a mind to lay them. We are looking for the man who can send us ejrgs when his neighbors' hens are frozen up." Rather a rough way of putting it, perhaps, but that's what a Portlaud merchant said to a newspaper man. POULTRY POINTS. A dark nest in a dry house, away from much noise, is where the hens you set should be quartered to be most successful in their hatching. Seclusion is most de sired. Chop up several ouions two or three times a week, throwing the pieces to them raw. It acts as a stimulant to the blood and an appetizer to a sluggish fowl. Try it now while the season of spring weather approaches. It is never wise to catch any fowl in your flock during the day, as it frightens the entire flock and makes them very shy and afraid of any one who a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

12 LITTLE BOY. Imm jest cum back from Jones,' An' my old eyes are dim With tears, for I wuz present W'eu death cum after Jim; Ycr know he had the fever, An' how the doctor said He never could recover- Yes, Marthy, Jim is dead. W'eu I K»t thar his mother Wuz kiieeliiT by his side. An' both her ban's held his v. She watched his face an' cried; A dimly burnin' caudle Throwed light about the room An' all wuz still exceptiu' Her wails of grief au' gloom. The preacher an' the uabers Stood weepin' 'roun the bed, An' Bill, the poor boy's father, Iv sorrer hung his head. His heart wuz almost broken, 'Twuz bleediu' sore an' sad. It wuz the hour o' partiu' Wi' the only child he had. His mother riz an' kissed him, Iyocked in her warm embrace, She moaned: "Oh! kiss me; kiss me. An' tears fell on his face; He oped his eyes an' whispered, His face put on er smile: "Ise doiu' ter heaven, mamma, Oo turn up after 'while." The preacher sed: "God saycth, 'Ter all of seteh ez he, " -You suffer little ch...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

china, old-fashioned silver and tapestry, showed that Keziah had, as she said, 'blue blood" in her veins. Once every year, Florinda told me, her niothar showed her these precious relics. The rest of the time the parlor door was kept locked, except on special occasions. Now came the mo3t welcome sound we had heard during our visit—the dinner bell. Were we asleep or dreaming, or had time begun to go backward? The desert was be fore us, served before the meat. I suppose our looks betrayed our surprise, for Mrs. Flint said, "I suppose your mother has her hearty victuals first, but we always eat our pie or pudding before our meat." Later we heard her say to mother: "You would find it more economical to serve your pudding first, for it takes the appetite for meat away." For days after the visit I dreamed of ancient maidens and solemn sermona, min gled with shuddering recollections of "Ja cob's bone." One night great excitement prevailed at the Flint farm. The great barn was on fire. The f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

'4 A SINGULAR HORSE STORY. A correspondent of the Chicago Inter- Ocean, now traveling in the Argentine Republic, closed a recent letter on the pastoral industry of that country with the following remarkable story or tradition that Is implicitly believed by the natives: About 40 miles above Buenos Ayres, there is a large green island in the La Plata, which in colonial days was the horse ranch of some wealthy nabob. The animals finally became so numerous that there was not enough grass to feed them properly; and as there was no demand for their export, the owner determined to reduce their number in a most barbarous way, viz.: by setting the grass on fire during the dry season ; the result of this method of reducing stock was a little more complete than he anticipated, and every horse on the island was burned to death, except a few that ran into the mighty river which hemmed them in and were drowned. Afterward the stench was so unbeara ble tnat for many weeks navigation on the La Plata...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

AMOUNT OF WATER NEEDED. Major Powell's statement that 24 inches of rainfall or irrigation water are neces sary to rase two tons of hay to the acre, is vigorously opposed by a correspondent of the Pacific Rural Press, who writes that his Los Angeles ranch, not irrigated, gets only 9 inches of rainfall, yet pro duces IJ4 tons of hay per acre. He well says that 24 inches must be distributed through the year more than is usual to prevent harmful washing of the soil. On the Yakima the Sunnyside canal supplies 24 inches, but it is bound to be at least double the amount requisite for any crops yet grown there. We would like to hear from Ranch readers on this point. BEN FRANKLIN'S. The man who lives only for himself ia engaged in very small business. Truth never dodges no matter who shoots. No man who needs a monument ever ought to have one. —Hawthorne. It won't do any good to paint the pump if there is poison in the water. Have you ever observed that we pay much more attention to a wise pa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 March 1894

16 Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands. Ist. There is, on account of the great growth of the country tributary to Prosser Falls, a demand for a distributing point. It is the outfitting point for the great Sunuyside country, that is now being irrigated by the N. P. Co., of which Paul Schulze is president. This canal is CO miles long, of which 42 miles are now completed. This canal is 30 feet wide on the bottom and carries 050 cubic feet of water per second of time. When fully com pleted it will irrigate 70,000 acres of land. 2d. Prosser Falls is the starting point of the great Yakima and Columbia system of canals that w ill irrigate "5,000 acres, throwing open to settlement a magnificent country. This canal is partially completed and work is being done at the present time. 3d. Prosser Falls is the outfitting point for the great Horse Heaven wheat district, comprising 400,000 acres, of which only 10,003 are now cultivated, but. later will support many thousand people. ~ , 4th. Prossei Falls...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR * YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 10. PROSPECTS. The Navajo Indiana of New Mexico own a million or more of sheep, and in the serenity of a thousand years on the oldest and safest homestead on the conti nent, look upon the Americano's haste to disperse his flocks as their golden oppor tunity. As a result the wise Navajos are swapping off horses for sheep in a fash ion that would make a Maine Yankee turn greaser to get a whack at such trades. But the Navajos will come out ahead. Sheep will pay best in the long run, and the country may hope for a greater supply in the future of the gen uine Navajo blankets, by all odds the finest product of the blanket loom known in any country. Sheep meu will do well to go slow on selling out, for a while at least, till the recovery begins. * * * The Yakima dairymen's meeting, sug gested by The Raxcii for next Saturday, as preliminary to a permanent organiza tion, has met with instant ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

2 and left a pretty open field to the fruU pests and diseases. The Oregonlan'l ml vice to get together and fix up a law that will bold, and that can be enforced, is sound. The matter of fruit pest sup pression is just as vital in Washington as in Oregon. No one seems to question the vitality of the present law that we know of. Here the point is: Will the people see that it is enforced before the orchards are so beset with insect foes that sup pression is next thing to Impoulb'e. This spring should tell the story as to whether our inspectors are in earnest in the work they have accepted or not. The case is one requiring activity and deter mination. * * Miss Aunie Howard, the charming ami able woman who so pleased her audience at the fruit growers' convention at Spo kane, and who doubtless is a successful teacher in her work tit the Washing Agri cultural Colletre, writes TriE Ranch that she is greatly interested in the State fair and is ready to take a hand iv promoting Its success. S...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

RANCH STORIES. EVEN READY. The Yakima real estate fiend is un doubtedly one of God's greatest creations. It would not be amiss to class him as the eighth wonder of the world. He is a good, bright talker with tongue set on a swivel and is always ready with an an swer to any question put by a prospective purchaser. Sometimes, however, his re plies are not always correct, although the intentions may be the best, as the follow ing will show. Not long since one of the "eighth won ders" from the lower valley, was showing an unsophisticated gentleman from the interior west what a truly wonderful sec tion we resided in, and striving assidu ously to convince the man of lowa that to enjoy life as it should be the simple exchange of a few of his eastern shekels for a ten-acre tiact of sage find sand would accomplish the desired rest.l. A team was procured and during their rambles they yisited several places near Zillah where the earth brought forth fruit trees in great abundance. At the last r...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 March 1894

4 WHAT TO SPRAY WITH. There are so many inquiries as to the composition of a spraying mixture that we again publish the formula for the "lime, sulphur and salt" solution, which has be come recognized as the standard mixture for winter use on all fruit trees. This is effective against the San Jose scale, wooly aphis, codlin moth and all other eggs of harmful insects found on the trees at this season of the year. Follow ing is the formula adopted by the state board of horticulture: Unslacked iime 40 pounds. Sulphur 20 pounds. Stock salt l 5 pounds. Water to make 60 gallons. Directions. —Place ten pounds of lime and twenty pounds of sulphur in a boiler with twenty gallons of water, and boil over a brisk fire for not less than one hour and a half, or until the sulphur is thoroughly dissolved. When this takes place the mi.xtuie will be of an amber color. Next place in a cask thirty pounds of unslacked lime, pouring over it enough hot water to thoroughly slack it, and while it is boilinir...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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