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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

j^^^BWBIIIBBH^Bjj^^H . .' '■ -V,-, "■ - ■ Nineteenth Year PROSPECTS. Judging by the attendance at the fairs this year, I am of the opinion that the farming population of the state has increased nearly 25 per cent in the last year. Not only were there more people, but the interest in the displays was much greater. The en thusiasm was at its height around the stock pens, showing that there is a very general awakening to the advan tage of pure-bred stock. Only a few years ago, when the higher types of pure-bred stock were first exhibited at the fairs, the natives were filled with amazement, the contrast was so great with the ordinary mixed stock of the country. Whenever anyone plucked up the courage to inquire as to prices, the figures named gave a startling shock. A few of the more progres sive ones who dared to purchase were set down as foolhardy, who would soon regret their extravagance. * * * A marked change has taken place among our farmers during the last few years. The progressi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

ft ALFALFA CULTURE. AddKM l>y Thomas .T. Bttphawon, nt tlio Annual Coin out ion of Hit- California Slate Dairymen's Association. As the feed for my cows consists almost entirely of alfalfa, I think it will be well at this time to tell how I mow this feed. First, as to the time of sowing, 1 have had the best success by sowing the seed during the month of March. Next, the preparation of the ground: Taking an old alfalfa field that needs re-sowing, I do not plow the land, for the reason that the plow cuts off the crown of the plant, and a new shoot or plant very seldom, if ever, starts up from the root again. But take the crown or head of the plant and bury it in the ground and it will throw out new roots and new shoots, and make a vigorous plant. Instead of the plow, I use the right lap disc, putting four horses on a disc that cuts about twen ty-four inches, the four discs being set six inches apart. I cut the ground one way, cutting about four inches deep, setting the disc at a sl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

I Ttf RA^£hl A-J»ijw^w,n^s^?wH»wiHn«ftt»»WtsT-. i With which Is consolidated The Washington Farmer, S. 1 The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FREEMAN, • - Editor and Manager. Editorial Offices: - - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander A Co., 521 First Aye Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscrip tions. Good commission and salaries paid. ■The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot Hud it on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

4 HEAP TALK. Then is a duel to the death on be tween BIWOOd Mead and George H. Maxwell. It is over irrigation. One is a United States officer, Mr. Mead being chief of irrigation investigations of the Interior Department, while the latter until the last irrigation con gress was president of the National Irrigation Association. Mead asserts that Maxwell acted in bad faith, and accused him of oppos ing the national irrigation act. Ho claims that Maxwell is actuated by personal animosity, and attacked the department because possibly of "sour grapes," and both men mix up over land leases and tchnical things hard for one not acquainted with the facts to understand. As likely one or both of the principals will attend the Oregon Irrigation Convention, it as sumes greater interest. Whatever the points of difference, the following language, expressed by Mr. Mead in an open letter to the delegates, and just issued, is plain enough to be understood. It says: "Judging from the fervor with which ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

in the trough with enough of the so lution to keep it covered for at least one and a half and better two hours. Shovel it out and dry it. "Oats cannot be treated loose, for they will float. Put the oats in the trough in half-filled sacks, churning each sack up and down to be sure that every grain is thoroughly wetted. Let them remain covered with the solution for one and a half or better two hours. Lift them out and spread the oats out to dry."—Pullman Herald. THT MAIL ORDER TRADE. The National Agricultural Press League, comprising the publishers of all the important farm papers in America, held its annual meeting in Minneapolis October 15 and 16. The editor of the Northwestern Agricul turist, P. V. Collins, of Minneapolis, was president of the League, and in preparing the program, was fortunate in inducing Mr. S. L. Ingram, the head of the reorganized firm known as the T. M. Roberts Supply Company, of Minneapolis, to appear before tue put>- Ushers and discuss the advantages of f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

6_ STARTING AN ORCHARD. The orchard is not receiving the at tention that it really should from the average farmers. They think the work is going to be overdone, but this is a Wrong idea. The Consumption of ap ples is increasing faster than the sup ply. Good Baldwins will never go beg ging for a market. First, let us start the orchard; many farmers will put out an orchard of fine trees and then leave them to shift for themselves and then look for a bounti ful return. But this method will not do for the first 12 or 14 years at least, as that period is the most critical period of a tree's existence. Trees are very much like animals, let them once get stunted and they never fully recover from it. Selecting the ground. To get the best flavored Baldwins we need a moist, cool, deep soil, the deeper the better. The best possible preparation that can be given is to thoroughly rot the old sward and fertilize until a good start of red clover can be se cured, seed down to cats as a cover crop f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

H. I. WEINSTEIN & CO. H. I. Weinstein has bought from the Meadowbrook Company the butter, cheese and egg business conducted by that company at 907-9 Western ave nue, and including the two creameries, one of which is operated in connec tion with its Seattle headquarters, and the other at Yakima. The Meadowbrook Company contin ues, owning the magnificent 1,200-acre farm at Snoqualmie. C. H. Hamilton will devote his attention to the man agement thereof. W. B. Shaw is heav ily interested in this farm, and Mr. Weinstein retains a one-third interest. Mr. Weinstein has been a member of the Meadowbrook Company since its organization a year ago. He under stands every feature of the dairy pro duce business thoroughly, and has learned the particular requirements of this field. He has ample financial cap ital, we are informed. Mr. Weinstein has an abiding faith in the future of Seattle. He has en gaged in this business because of such faith, and believes that it offers splen did opportuniti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

8_ CREAMERY OPERATOR'S VIEWS. Editor of the Ranch: T have read with great interest the communica tion of your subscriber of Redmond, Wash, on page 3 of your last issue. First I thought, it is useless to write anything on that subject, but thinking the matter over more care fully, I decided to write the truth and nothing but the truth about the con ditions of creameries in our state. We all know that truth hurts the most, and we also know that bare facts and nothing but bare facts are carefully withheld from the public and it is still more wonderful how some people styling themselves business men do not dare or are unable to face bare facts. I will endeavor to analyze the true condition of the creameries and dai ries in this state, regardless of whether I hurt the creamery manager (I am one myself) or the dairy farmer. Let me say right here: the business conditions of many of our creameries are rotten and so are many of our dai ries. To remedy any evil we must know first the cause. T...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

COULDN'T SELL OLEO. Dairy Commissioner Bailey, of Ore gon, was called on one day last week by a representative of Swift & Co. The trust has some accomplished jol liers employed on the road, and this was one of the best. He handed it to Bailey in large chunks. After spinning a few yarns, reviewing the political situation, inquiring solicitously after the state of Bailey's health he announced that he had come to Ore gon to sell oleomargarine. "Sell all you can," said Bailey, free and easy-like. "Only mind you keep within the state law. Here's a copy. Take it along." The genial representative avowed his honorable company wouldn't think of violating the law. He just called around to confer with the commission er as a matter of courtesy. Was so glad he had no objections to his doing a little oleo biz. "Wet day, isn't it? Have a cigar." Next day the genial representative of the trust came back. "Sell any oleo?" inquired Bailey. "Not a d —d pound." "What's the trouble?" "Trouble? Why t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

xo THE GRAZING LAW HELD TO BE CONSTITUTIONAL. Much diversity of opinion has existed among the cattle and sheep men as to the constitutionality of the law regulat ing grazing upon the reserves. The fol lowing opinion rendered by Judge Beat ty, in the circut court of the Northern District of California in the case of the United States of America vs. August Dasterveguesit, will be read with in- terest: "The government seeks to restrain the defendants from pasturing their sheep upon certain public lands desig nated by the president as the -'Stanis laus Forest Reservation,' The act of congress, approved June 4th, 1897 (3i stats, 35), authorized the secretary of the interior, in his superintendence of all forest reservations, to 'Make such rules and regulations and establish such service as will insure the objects of such reservation, namely to regulate their occupancy and use and to pre serve the forest thereon from destruc tion. "In pursuance of such authority the secretary prohibited t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

rules are valid. This difference of view, it may be suggested, invites a review by the circuit court of appeals. "Defendants also claim that by long use they are entitled to pasturage up on these lands, and cite Buford vs. Houtz, 133 U. S. 320 in support of such claim. That case only says on page 326, that unenclosed lands of the government may be used for pas turage by the people, when 'No act of the government forbids their use.' In the present case the government has forbidden their use. Moreover as laches cannot be invoked against the government, long use by the defend ants gave them no title. This defense is not tenable." PAULHAMUS' POULTRY FARM. The poultry farm of W. H. Paulha mus, in Pierce county, Washington, is one of the most perfect of its kind in the Northwest. It is stocked with Brown Leghorn and Barred Plymouth Rock chickens and geese, ducks and pigeons. The runs are large and in clude a big raspberry field in which the fowls roam and eat grass, weeds and bugs. Modern...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

IS FROM GRAIN FARMING TO LIVE STOCK. Sooner or later every farmer in the West who is growing grain will have to consider the question of how he had best get over to live stock farming. He may not like it, but he will have to come to it. People do not like wrin kles, nor crow's feet, nor stiff joints, nor gray hair, but they may as well take them philosophically. All these will come. They will grow old, and they may as well grow old gracefully as not. So the grain farmer may as well conclude to quit farming or have his land decrease in fertility and hence in value, or learn to become a live stock farmer, or, we should rather say, to learn mixed or diversified farm ing. Why? Because no land on the face of the earth, except perhaps in coun tries like Egypt, fertilized by the an nual overflow, will retain available fer tility always under a system of all grain farming, whether it be wheat, corn, flax, oats, barley, or any possible combination of them. We say "avail able" fertility. He c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

BREEDING FOR SPRING PIGS. John M. Jamison. The greater part of the hogs pro duced are spring farrowed. Still, much more is being thought of the fall pig, and many are farrowed during the summer months, and a lew breeders are willing to have pigs farrowed dur ing the winter. The all year demand on the market is gradually changing the old customs. Later on so much attention will not be given to the time when pigs are farrowed, but more care will be given to looking after them and making hogs of them. The spring month most desirable in which to have pigs farrowed depends on how the farmer is fixed to care for them. March is the favorite month, yet many are lost in March —probably more than in any other month in the year—be cause the farmers are not in shape to give them proper care. Some farmers breed for March, when they know they are not fixed to care for the pigs; but they hope to be and fail, the pigs also proving to be a failure. Many breed for March, hoping the weather will be pl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

'4 **^ 4l2»^B^^^B^^ <^B? ««2^ <^B^ «^B^ «^B^ «IB^ «^B^ «^L^ «^L^ I^^fc l^^k !^^!^^ !^^^ l^^fcl^^fc I^^^ I^^^ *^k*^^ iff "__*** >*'•*' fl P\^l <-*wf-vl Butter and Cheese I /ft I IS BBM^ V^ Bran V %■*<« I in Which Moulton's Cadillac Salt \j/ §^ —-Zj^Mßb^^^ Was used, have taken the following prizes: \'§ 5 nj r^ LJ CZ™ #V l\/g Second grand prize in gathered cream yj'f (jf\ s^ 3^ll Vy I *^-»»l»l class, National Butter-Makers' Convention, yiy /ft /£^|§lllltJ| o c-na El* ATn r* a^ Lincoln Neb 1900. f|> 53i— r^A\lx/\ I V_/ rv^l? ..Nebraska cup for highest entry from \|/ §*"< * Bi f^ w\r4 <-%, v+4 s~\-F First, Minnesota State Fair, 1900. is /ft (IP^L '5^»JT| OXaMUar QOT First and Second, Nebraska State Fair, /S % I "th© \A/Orld FirSt and Swee Pstakes' Illinois State Fair, JK h\ (!• H|pa First, Missouri State Fair, 1901. }X §*! Hi,'vk First, Wisconsin State Fair, 1901. JK —^s^'^B Iwf m First, Wisconsin. State Fair, igoi. W A :iisl B&J^v DISBROW CHURNS . First and S...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

ALFALFA CULTURE. (Continued from Page Two.) cows become cloyed and refuse to eat the green feed. A change then be comes necessary, and it is here that I use the barley hay that is grown on the high land, and also the barley hay that is grown with the first crop of newly-grown alfalfa. Barley hay fed alone is a very poor milk-producing food, but fed in connection with fresh alfalfa, it answers a very good pur pose. Wheat, barley or oat straw would answer as well as barley hay. A continual diet of the fresh green food alone makes the bowels too loose, causing scours. Feeding the cows for two or three days on the freshly-made hay, of which I have already spoken, will correct this, but usually it is only necessary that the cows have the bar ley hay in small quantities, with the green feed, and the trouble will be prevented. The cows will eat the dry hay or stray with relish; their system seems to need it. Precautions. There are two things to which I wish to call your attention. The firs...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 November 1902

i 6 jjfv Why don't you send to 111 . . £Uu,£ogardus«(a 1 W For the finest SEED catalog ever printed in the West. Its. a It V . money-saving book for the farmer who buys. llf Eggs are high. Now is the tinie^, , -<^'^.., ..,,jj a i| r %,. ISL to Use Midland Poultry Food^^^^^^^^p iyS*|k The only Scientifically Prepared and * Properly Balanced Ration for Poultry. . ■■*»** • | - MIDLAND BRANDS. •.offl' 2° I DdTllllS © liOIHIHIIiy S fir- KOW-KURF I * —Nursery Chick Food. % M'•• 1 ANIMAI UCIIC Ilk IXV^*'' rwrvCi *l 2 —Growing Chick Food. ' . «•' i . ■ AIiIItIAL IrltALo l|§L FILLS THE j||P* 3 —Fattening- Chick Food. ; i^?B wn RFFF Stf*BAP 'Iffk UDDER 4—^SS and Feather Producing Food. J^ : : ■ tHiIL 5 —Nursery Duckling Food. M i {■ will make hens lay —not by "dosing" them isHi^H • *c«6s»lr ,- • r~> • -I-. !i • ■ -r« j ;. . H whh drugs, but by eivinc' them the lliw *sJBr 6—Growing Duckling Food. ;;40 1 proper material 7 from which to --w 7 — Fattening Duckling and Goose Food. » ;■ ■ mak...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

I SSESE^ ==^^^^B =~^^^^^^ ~■- ' ? ' 'y^^^~Z^^^^^^^^^^B "^^^^3m ~ H Nineteenth Year PROSPECTS. Portland is counting on the forth coming legislative session of Wash ington state making an appropriation of about a quarter of a million dollars for the Lewis and Clark Exposition to be held in that city in 1905. A gang of web-footers will be sent up to Olympia to exert themselves in be half of the measure. The appeal will be made on the ground that it will be an affair in which the whole North west will be alike benefited. We are next door to Oregon and it's the neighborly thing to do, will be urged. This is all very well, but The Ranch doesn't believe the results will be worth the expenditure. It would be of undoubted advantage if such an exposition would draw one hund red thousand people or more from the east especially to attend it —but it won't. If a thousand people come out from the east to see the Lewis and Clark exposition, it will exceed our expectations. * * * The people are stal...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

a Observations In Washington. [Hnyseecl Jr., In lSiivdors" Gazette. J To The Gazette.—A few days ago 1 met three Indiana farmers on a train that was speeding westward across one of the wheat-growing sections of Washington and nearing their jour ney's end. It was a repe.-iion of an old story; the boys were about grown, the old farm was too small, a little money in the bank, high-priced land at home and then the trip to the far West to look for cheaper land and a new home. "I was just thinking," re marked one of them, "that I would go back home and tell mother we would settle down and stay where we are, that we have a better country right tnere at home than 1 ever thought we had before." Then as he looked from the car-window at the buildings on a wheat ranch without a shrub or a tree in sight he continued: "If I should bring mother out to this country I wonder how she would get along in the summer time without the shade from her big maple tree." So it is with some of us; as soon as we...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

r tfE RANCh with which is consolidated I he Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the Btate Live Stock Breeders' Associ ation. MILLER FREEMAN, - Editor and Manager. Editorial Offices: - - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 621 First Aye Subscription (in advance) $1.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot Utid It on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must have both name and address, and all a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 December 1902

4 The Brightest Spot on the Map I r.v De Win c. Brttt, editor <>( Chetan l.fMll.'l-. | There is a Biblical saying. that "The first shall be the last, and the last first." That, in the judgment of the writer, will apply preeminently— particularly the latter clause — to the lake Chelan country. Here is a Wonderland section, rich in every thing that goes to make prosperity ;ind to build up commercial centers; and yet, up to quite recently, it has liteially been "out of sight."' There are doubtless many dwellers in your own metropolis who have never even heard of the largest lake in the State, and but few who could tell you any thing of its marvelous attractions and resources. Lake Chelan, whose outlet is 40 miles from the nearest railroad point, at Wenatchee, boasts of possessing scenic attractions that cannot, be ex celled on the globe, and the most even temperature and beautiful clim ate in America, and it is undoubtedly destined to become one of the most noted and popular plea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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