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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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TREE CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

TREE CULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ARTIFICIAL FOREST CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

ARTIFICIAL FOREST CULTURE. In the Premium List of the State Agricultural Society for 1871 a premium of 50 dollars was offered for the largest quantity of useful forest trees planted during the year. At the meeting of the Board of Agriculture, held on the Oth inst., this premium was awarded to James T. Stratton, of Alameda county. There were three applicants for the premium—Mr. Stratton, and E. T. Aiken and Thomas Edwards, of Sacramento county. The contest was considerably spirited, and has excited a good deal of interest. The subject being new in the State and of so much general importance we give below the statement of each applicant made in writing to the Board. They will be found to contain many valuable hints in regard to the cultivation of artificial forests. Mr. Stratton proved that he had planted during the year, on 68% acres of land, in one tract, 80,000 blue gum trees {euculuptus glubulus) and 8,000 red gum trees, and that all were in a healthy, growing condition. The follo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SETTING TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

SETTING TREES. Written for the Rural Pdehh by Rustic. My father always set trees with a pole 16 feet long, and a small cord 80 or 90 feet long; but he did'nt always get the trees exactly straight until a neighbor told him of the following plan that he had tried for sometime. To get trees in perfectly straight rows, where you have no lines as a guide, get a surveyor or some other person who understands the business, to start your lines and set your pegs. The cost will be but a trifle, and the satisfaction in looking at your trees afterward will more than pay. Have as many pegs as you mean to set trees, about 20 inches long and all the same size, if possible. Willow sprouts, an inch thick, with the bark off, are good. In order to get the trees exactly where, you set the pegs, take a straight stick, six or eight feet long, with a notch around it in the middle and four flat pegs and you are ready for operation. Now put down your eight-foot stick, on any side, with the notch against the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TREE PLANTING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

TREE PLANTING. The Prairie Farmer very justly commends the spirit that has seized the farmers of Illinois, to plant forest trees. It is clearly a Provindential instinct, for it has swept the country like an epidemic. Every one asks: "How many trees have you planted this year V" Not one in a hundred answers "None." At every agricultural meeting members vie with each other in reporting the largest number and the greatest variety set out. They are mostly from seed, and usually eight feet apart, to be thinned out as they expand in dimensions. Every one speaks of the increased retentiveness of the soil for moisture, within the influence of their protection. Especially they attest their sheltering effect against the dessicating and disagreeable winds that are the great objection to life on the treeless prairies. They report a notable improvement in health—less ague and rheumatism, and less catarrhal disturbance. A few years ago, some leaders of the movement planted trees as wind-brakes to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

New Zealand Flax in Nevada.—Mr. O. Hyde writes as follows: —In the article on New Zealand Flax, your correspondent mentions having heard of its being known in Nevada. Such is the fact. While prospecting along the Shell Creek range of mountains, about fifty miles east of Hamilton, I got off my horse to examine large bunches of grass, the body of which, near the ground, were matted together in regular tow heads. The fibres were so strong that it was difficult to break the smallest thread, and I remarked to my companions that it would make excellent rope, or in the rough, roots and all, good ]>aper stock. The Indians have used it to make lines and thread. It grew on the immediate low land between the meadow wire grass and the sage bush, and there were patches of several acres in extent. "Wild Game. —Lake Merrit, in Oakland, promises to become a favorite breeding place for wild water fowl, by reason of the restrictions placed upon shooting in that vicinity. After coming to ma...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"CAST THY BREAD UPON THE WATERS AND IT SHALL RETURN UNTO THEE AFTER MANY DAYS." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

"CAST THY BREAD UPON THE WATERS AND IT SHALL RETURN UNTO THEE AFTER MANY DAYS." A STORY BY NELL VAN. [Written for the Press.] In the attic of a dilapidated dwelling, on Mulberry street, in the city of New York, there once lived a little girl named Kitty Dorr. Her farther was a ship carpenter, and had for a number of years supported his family comfortably; but being disabled by an accident, he fell into indecent habits, among dissolute companions, and failed to obtain steady employment. His wife, finding it necessary to do something for the support of the family, applied for sewing at the ready-made clothing stores where she was abundantly supplied with work for which she was poorly paid. Early and late the ambitious woman worked while little Kitty did what she could to help, wondering why "Papa" staid away from home so late and seemed so cross when he did come. As time wore on, the mother grew paler and thinner from loss of rest and anxiety of mind; the voice grew feeble and her eye...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SOUNDS OF INDUSTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

SOUNDS OF INDUSTRY. BY MKS. F. D. GAGE. I Love the clanging of the hammer, The whirring of the plane, The crashing of the busy saw, The creaking of the crane; The ringing of the anvil, The grating of the drill, The clatt'ring of the turning lathe, The whirring of the mill; The clipping of the tailor's sheers, The driving of the awl: These sounds of active industry, I love —I love them all. For they tell my listening spirit Of the earnestness of life, How much of all its pleasure Cometh of toil and strife; Not the toil or strife which fainteth And murnmreth by the way; Not the toil or strife which groaneth Beneath h tyrant's sway: Hut the toil that ever springeth From a free and willing heart, The strife that ever brlngeth To the toiler, nobler part. O, there's joy and good in labor, If we labor but aright, Giving vigor to the day-time And sweeter sleep at night; A good that bringeth pleasure E'en to the toiling hours, For duty cheers the spirit As the dew revives the flowers; Giving...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GIRLS AND MATRIMONY [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

GIRLS AND MATRIMONY "Mintwood" in her last conwrtadon in Moore's Rural New Yorker, gives the following sensible advice to girls:—How you who are soon to be married, fret and worry over your wedding outfit I How you toil all the day with needle and sewing machine, and' lie awake nights planning and arranging shapes and trimmings! How you are occupied with these really trifling matters up to the verge of your wedding hour, so that as brides you are worn out, nervous, and weak from overwork. Your strength of body and mind has been lavished on dry goods, as if your lovers eared a straw for them in comparison with you, yourselves, which you have so abused by neglect. A neat and fully respectable outfit, of course, is desirable'; but great quantities of elaborate garments are entirely unnecessary. A girl who always keeps her wardrobe in good condition is as well prepared to marry, so far as such things are concerned, as she is to remain unmarried. She needs no more clothing as a wife, tha...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eating Without Appetite. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Eating Without Appetite. It is wrong to eat without appetite, for it shows there is no gastric juice in the stomach, and that nature does not need food, and there not being any fluid to receive and act upon it, it would remain there to putrefy—the very thought of which should be sufficient to deter any man from eating without an a2>petite for the remainder of his life. If a topic is taken to whet the appetite, it is a mistaken course; for its only result is to cause one to eat more, when already an amount has been eaten beyond what the gastric juice supplied has been able to prepare. The object to be obtained is a larger supply of gastric juice, not of a larger supply of food; and whatever fails to accomplish that essential object fails to have any efficiency toward the cure of dyspeptic disease; and as the formation of gastric juice directly proportioned to the wear and waste of the system, which it is to be the means of supplying, and this wear and waste can only take p...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Domestic Receipts. Liquid Blueing.—To one part of Prussian blue add gradually two parts of concentrated muriatic acid. Let the paste stand for twenty-four hours, then add nine parts of water, and bottle it. The solution of indigo in sulphuric acid is also used for the same purpose. To prepare it, pulverize one ounce of pure indigo, and add it by degrees to four and a half ounces of concentrated sulphuric acid, mixing it well by stirring with a glass rod. If desired, the acid may afterwards be neutralized with carbonate of potash. Yeast. —The following is recommended by first-rate authority as a method of making good yeast, that will keep for weeks, even in hot weather:—On Monday morning put two ounces of best bale hops into a gallon and a pint of cold water, boil half an hour, strain hot, and dissolve two ounces of finest table salt and half a pound of sugar in the liquor; when cooled to new milk warmth, put one pound of sifted flour into a large basin, make a well in the center of ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Mechanical Hints. To Revive the Color of Faded Black Cloth or Leather. —Take of the best quality of blue galls, four ounces; of logwood, clean sulphate of iron (copperas), clean iron filings and sumac leaves, each one ounce; put the galls, logwood and sumac berries into one quart of the best white wine vinegar, and heat to nearly the boiling point in a sand bath, then add the iron filings and copperas; digest for twen-ty-four hours, and strain for use. Apply with a sponge. Furniture Oil. —To one quart of linseed oil add one ounce of bruised alkanet root, and boil them together in a glazed earthen vessel until the color is extracted from the root; then cool, and strain for use. Wood Preservative. —In the Ammlesdc Genie Civile, Dr. Reinsah gives the following directions for rendering wood difficult of combustion and preserving it underground. "The wood, unplaned, is to be placed for twenty-four hours in a liquid composed of one part of concentrated silicate of potassa and three of pur...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Life Thoughts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Life Thoughts. An old dog cannot alter his way of barking. . A deceitful man is more hurtful than open war. A nod from a lord is a breakfast for a fool. He that fears you present, will hate you absent. It is more easy to praise poverty than to bear it. A penny worth of mirth is worth a pound of sorrow. Grieving for misfortunes is adding gall to wormwood. Hold your little twinkling light boldly and honestly; then God will pour in the oil, and make it a blazing torch. Always laugh when you can—it is a cheap medicine. Mirthfulness is a philosophy not well understood. It is the sunny side of existence. Be not affronted at a jest. If one toss salt at thee, thou wilt receive no harm unless thou hast sore places. Would a man frequently calculate his income and expenditure, he would escape many a bitter reflection; for lie must be lost to every generous feeling of pride and honorable principle who wantonly incurs debt which he knows he can not discharge. Kind Words ! they are blessed things...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sometime. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Sometime. It is a sweet, sweet song warbled to and fro among the topmost boughs of the heart, and filling the whole air with such joy and gladness as the songs of the birds do when the summer morning comes out of darkness, and day is born on the mountains. We have all possessions in the futue, which we call "sometime." Beautiful flowers and singing birds are there, only our hands seldom grasp the one, or our ears hear the other. But oh, reader, be of good cheer. For all the good there is a golden " sometime" when the hills and valleys of time are all passed; Avhen the wear and fever, the disappointment and sorrow of life are over; then there is the place and rest appointed of God. Oh, homestead ! over whose roof fall no shadows or even clouds, and over the threshold the voice of sorrow is never heard; built upon the etei-nal hills, and standing with the spires and pinnacles of celestial beauty among the palm trees of the city on high, those who love God shall rest under thy shadows,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanics' Institute. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Mechanics' Institute. The quarterly report (for December, January and February) of the President, Mr. Hallidie, shows on the whole a favorable and progressive condition of affairs. The financial status is better, for although the balance on hand, $604.33, does not seem large, yet during the last three months over $500 have been paid out for the coming Industrial Fair, and, what is particularly gratifying, $3,000 have been paid on account of the indebtedness of the society, reducing it to $37,000. Moreover, the building has been painted and otherwise improved. During the quarter 97 members joined the Institute. While a few leave each month, the average gain monthly is 30. Many valuable documents have been presented and 254 books purchased. The lectures, commenced in the preceeding quarter by the Mechanic Arts College of the University of Csl., are still in progress, and students and visitors show no lack of interest, there being many applications to fill any vacancies which occur. Th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A FEW WORDS TO THE UNEMPLOYED. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

A FEW WORDS TO THE UNEMPLOYED. Editors Press.—lt is with feelings of regret, I read in the daily papers that there is no improvement in the condition of the working men in our city. Work is scarce, and many families are feeling the pinching of hard times, while hundreds are daily pacing the streets in an unsuccessful search for employment. Now I hold that any person who can advance anything in the shape of a practical idea, towards the amelioration of this state of things, owes a duty to his fellow man, that he has no right to neglect, and therefore I pen this article, assuring all interested that I state nothing but facts, which I am ready and willing at all times to substantiate. About four months ago, after laying idle for over two months, seeking employment at my trade in this city, without success; dispirited and sick, both mind and body, I resolved in my own mind to stait into the country, and work at anything I could get to do. One thing was certain, if I went away, there was...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HUMOROUS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

HUMOROUS. A Breaking wave is the only thing in nature that is the most beautiful at the moment of its dissolution. •'Woman is a delusion, madam !" exclaimed a crusty old batchelor to a Witty young lady. "And man is always hugging some delusion or other," was the quick piyBoston girls refuse to eat corn starch pudding, lest it might impart stiffness to their manners. When is a chimney like a chicken V When it is a little foul. A man who says he will subscribe anon, very often proves to be a non-subscriber. Theke is a man in town so knowing, that people who don't know their own minds, come to him for information on the subject. The vain man idolizes his own person, and here he is wrong; but he cannot bear his own company, and here he is right. A seobet is my slave as long as I keep it under; a secret is my master the moment it escapes from me. Love is better than a pair of spectacles to make everything seem greater which is seen through it. What is the difference between a man who kee...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE TWO VERSIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

THE TWO VERSIONS. An early morning adventure appeared to and was described by its hero as follows: "I rose with the glorious sun, with my friend and host, and sullied out for an early sail on the lake. Every drop of dew on the grass, or tree or flower, was a sparkling gem 'of purest ray serene.' The air itself was an elixir, and the music of the early birds, with the soft fluttering of leafy boughs, was suggestive of the perfect harmonics of a sinless sphere. Too much entranced to be thoughtful or prudent, we embarked in a frail skiff which betrayed our confidence, and left us struggling amid the waves. We breasted them with " hearts of controversy," and reaching the shore, returned to our home before we were fairly missed, dripping like water gods." Hia wife was less poetic: "It was the most ridiculous adventure; they went out half dressed, without hats or coats, as if they had been scai-ed from home by a nightmare; and put off, like a couple of dunces, in an old boat that leaked w...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Meteorological Observations. At Sachamf.nto, Oat,., BY THOR. M. LOOAN, M. D. Permanent Secretary of State Board of Health. Lat. 38° 3141" N., Lonjf. 12I C29'44"W. Hifjhtat Levee above iiuan low tide, at San Francisco, 74 feet, flight oj' lower surface of mercury, HI fe<t. The amount of cloudiness in de-ignatrd liv figures, 10 licinK entire cloudiness; 5, half cloudiness; 0, entire clearness; and intermediate numberß in proportion. Tlie force of the wind is also registered in tile same manmr; 0 being a calm, 1 a very lik'h. breeze, mill IU a hurricane. The means are derived from three daily rcadniKH at 7 A. M., 'I v. M.. and 9 P. M., in uniformity with the arrangements of the Smithsonian Institute. Rkmarks.—Saturday, March 4.—Ah shown in our wind column, March came in "like a lion," with a strong northwest wind, oaualng the evaporation of more rain in one day than fell during any rainy day of the season. With the exception of thin one day, the weather has been genial, and ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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