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Elephind.com contains 674,752 items from Farmer And Settler, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE FIGHT FOR HOMES. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

THE FIGHT FOR HOMES. By H. S. No man has any strong objection to a fair fight, and is always willing to give the spoils to the winner; but an en counter in which one combatant has both hands tied behind his back and a band age over both eyes, whilst the other has the free use of both hands and eyes, of British fair play. This introductory sentence shews ex actly the conditions under which the bona fide settler and the pastoralist have met in the struggle for the public estate, which is the birthright of every soul in the colony. Perhaps, at first, it was na tural that the man in occupation should resent what he took to be a trespass on his domain, and no one could object to the use of any legitimate means against the incursion of the settler; but it was neither honest, legitimate, nor fair to barter with the public estate in the man ner, unfortunately, many pastoralists have. The evidence which has been given before the Royal Commission now sitting to en quire into the lands adminis...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GENTLEMAN'S HACKNEY. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

A GENTLEMAN'S HACKNEY. By Frank McCaffrey. No animal in the use of mankind is more often discussed in the columns of the press and elsewhere than our saddle horses and how to breed them ; yet, no system, so far the writer knows, has ever been perfected by which a gentleman's hackney can be bred with 'any degree of certainty. In fact, so much uncertainty hangs around the many theories in vogue for raising hackney-getting stock that many intelligent stock-raisers seem to lnnlc imnn tlir- nrnrlnrlirm nf n lncrii-ri ;--;-; hackney as a sort of accident of birth more than anything else. More especially is- this conclusion forced on one's mind after having spent years in striving to perpetuate any given system which might be suggested. ?It has been stated by an ancient autho rity that probably the most renowned ? horse that ever existed was Bucephalus, the celebrated charger of Alexander the Great. This famous charger was a pie bald, white colored, with' large deep bay spots. He was bough...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
(Per favor of the Editor of "The Farmer and Settler.") . [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

(Per favor of the Editor of 'The Farmer and Settler.') . Sir, — Your correspondent 'Cypher' gives a partial history of Federation, and it is important that partisans should not be allowed to make 'The Farmer and Settler' a vehicle' of any misrepresenta tion. The history of Federation was some thing quite different to his version, and was as follows : — The agitation com menced in Sydney, the late Sir Henry Parkes being its advocate ; ' after him, Mr. Barton (now Sir Edmund'). After much argument, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia commenced to con sider it, to meet about it, and so forth. New South Wales did not tell the other colonies, 'We must have the Federal city.' Western Australia and Queens land were reluctant to join. Now, 'Sir, 'Cypher' wants to make' your readers believe that it was Sydney that was making the sacrifice all the time for the common weal, that, in fact, they were advocating a thing for their., own injury, and for their neighbours' good. In due course the...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"CYPHER'S" PARTIAL HISTORY REFUTED. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

'CYPHER'S' PARTIAL HISTORY REFUTED. 'Truth, ever faithful since the world began, The foe of the tyrant and the friend of man.'

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN THE CARCOAR DISTRICT. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

-? '» ^fr ^ » «» ?» 4- '«* ^ IN THE CARCOAR DISTRICT. At the last meeting of the Pastures Board, the inspector's report showed that rabbits were still very numerous, par ticularly on holdings where very little poisoning had been carried out. He had been compelled to warn no fewer than 44 landholders. wini rererence 10 a sianaaru wue netting, the following resolution was adopted : — 'This board adheres to its pre vious view that the best and proper stan dard of wire netting to keep out rabbits is unquestionably that known as ii by 17 by 42, and considers that no certificates of conformity under Section 38 should be granted for any other Nevertheless, it is of opinion that persons desirous of wire netting their holdings for the purpose of checking rabbits, should, if they wish, be supplied by the Government with cheaper grades through the Advances to Settlers' Board, but that in all cases where a hold ing has been fenced with \\ x 17 x 42, the owner or occupier shall be entitled to cl...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ITEMS FROM WARREN. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

ITEMS FROM WARREN. Says the Warren Herald : — The Canonbar P.P. Board has received applications for something like 300 miles of wire netting. Mr. Joseph Green has purchased suffi cient wire netting to enclose the whole of his Wallangambone holding. Wire netting has been delivered for en closing Hon. .H. E. Kater's Yanganbil property, near Warren. The work of en closing will be under the supervision of the manager, Mr. D. Wass. A fumigator, worked by Mr. W. J. Moore, was in operation in the Warren Park on Monday last, for the purpose of 'settling' bunny. The results proved very satisfactory Brer-Rabbit has apparently been get ting same 'hurry up' at B'ullagreen. Mr. E.- C. Welsh this week despatched one ton of rabbit skins from Warren, representing kills from 'Oak Hill.' Mr. William Pearse informs us that in the immediate vicinity of Collie, no less than 130,000 rabbits have been captured recently. He himself accounted for 30,000, and the Rankmore family have despatched no less than ...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN EXPLANATION. To the Editor "The Farmer and Settler. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

AN EXPLANATION. To the Editor 'The Farmer and Settler.'' Sir, — In your issue of the 28th you call attention to the proposal of an American firm to supply 'low-down' harvesters to sell in Australia at ,650. This information will be misleading to your reade/rs unless they are well in formed that the reaper and binder used in Australia is known as a harvester in Ame rica. It is verv evident that the before mentioned offer refers to ' the ordinary reaper and binder, an entirely different machine to the stripper-harvester. Our farmers are not looking for a 'low- down' stripper-harvester, but one that is adapted to strip crops from six inches to six feet in height. Their requirements in this respect are already well catered for by local manufacturers, who have in vented the machine and pioneered the trade without any free grant or bonus from the Government, as asked for by the American .firm. — Yours truly, (For the Meadowbank Manufacturing Company) E. TRIGG, General Manager.

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENCOURAGING THE SETTLER. OFFICIOUS OFFICIAL ZEAL. To the Editor "The Farmer and Settler.'1 [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

ENCOURAGING THE SETTLER. OFFICIOUS OFFICIAL ZEAL. To the Editor 'The Farmer and Settler.1' Shy— I am only' a poor struggling little 'cocky,' with a freehold, of 136 , acres' fronting a large creek, and all cleared. The Government rabbits from .adjoining reserves have been my curse, having had the best of my crops for years. However, by scraping and pvncn ing, I managed to save enough to wire net the place. Wanting posts to fence ,creek off, and Government rabbits with it, I got two licenses at 5s. and enough posts (100) from two (tdead' trees: I thought I was entitled to the timber gratis, seeing that I had to go to great expense to fence out the Government rabbits, and wrote to' the forester that 1 'expected him to use '.his prerogative a'nd forego the royalty. But no ; he sent an assistant out 'here (thirty miles) in a buggy with a spanking team of -greys to collect the 4s. 6d royalty. Ye Gods ! ? What an object-lesson on economy, and this during the regime of a Reform. Government...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR HORSE COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

OUR HORSE COLUMN. By 'Childe Harold.' The New Zealand bred horse Gold Medallist achieved the greatest honor ever accorded an Australasian horse when last month he was awarded the Kingr's premium of 150 guineas at the Islington (Eng.) Hunters' Show. Gold Medallist was bred by Mr. G. G. Stead, the well known Maoriland racing man, and per formed well in his native land before going to England in 189S. He is now rising 12 years. * * * The French Government give every as sistance and encouragement in the breed ing and racing of thoroughbred stock. The best stallions money can buy the world over are at the service of owners of mares at a nominal fee. A reduction of 50 per cent, on the ordinary fares by rail is allowed for the carriage of racing stock and mares going to and from the stud, and the privilege is allowed of de spatching boxes by express and special trains. * * * The old-time studs of draught stock in New South Wales are pretty well broken up, but the high prices which are give...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WEEDING OUT. To the Editor "The Farmer and Settler." [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

WEEDING OUT. To the Editor 'The Farmer and Settler.'' Sir, — Mr. Trefle no doubt feels amused at the uncalled-for attacks made against him by 'The Farmer and Settler' news paper and the Association generally. One article said he has found his level at last. So say I. He is evidently too good a man to be wasting his time and ability with such a .concern as the Farm ers' and Settlers' Association, as it is a known fact that all the good that has been achieved by the Association has been brought about by the patriotism and ability of a few of the Laborites connect ed with the Association — viz., Tom Brown, J.- L. Trefle, etc., etc. Mr. Brown delivered the opening address at Wagga at the first Conference of the Association. That was a masterpiece of. eloquence, such as we cannot hear from the Jackin the-box orators and \vould-be squatters connected with the F. and S. Association now. I am a member of the Association, and I feel sure it would not last a year only for the branches doing l...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DAIRYMAN. OUR DAIRY LANDS—THEIR RENTAL VALUES. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

THE DAIRYMAN. By Frank McCaffrey. OUR DAIRY LANDS— THEIR RENTAL VALUES. If we take, for example, a tenant dairy farmer who has leased ioo acres of land, valued at ,£20 per acre, on a 5 per cent, rent basis, the rental value is £1 per acre per year. When our dairying- lands were new and -the pastures rich in grass production, these prices could be paid easily, and the tenant farmer was then 1 « n nrtci firvw tr\ nliro ouro^r o cum . rvr money over and above his requirements to purchase a farm of his -own at the end of probably a ten years' lease. ' At that time many of our dairymen paid for their farms from the returns of pigs, calves, and poultry alone. ? * * * In those days 100 acres of land would keep all the year round 40 milch cows, besides other animals of the farm. Those dairy cows would produce from butter alone at least £10 each per month for the whole year. To-day 100 acres of land will barely keep 30 cows all the year round, and it will be found difficult to extract £S per...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COMPARATIVE VALUE OF DAIRY COWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

COMPARATIVE VALUE OF DAIRY COWS. A contemporary says' that 'According to an eminent authority many farmers over-estimate the real value of larg-e cows, and*, as a rule, under-estimate the value of a small cow giving. a light flow of milk rich in butter fat.' ' A statement of this kind brings us at (once into the arena of the battle of the breeds, and therefore our comparisons should be based as near as possible on practical ex perience. ''.''? 1 ' . . ? * * * Our contemporary says: — 'In. enter ing the dairy farm at the State farm there are in the first row two cows stand ing side by side. One weighs 1,300 and the other 875 lbs/' Now it is' necessary to state here from' experience that No. 1 is a beef cow pure and simple, and No. - 2 not too far removed from what is called a general purpose cow, as 600 or 700 lbs. 1 is- a big- weight indeed for a dairy cow of any 'breed. ', We 'will, however, pass ? that point over without further comment, and debate the question on the general basi...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

Deniliquin P. and A. Society has given notice of the following resolution dealing with additional subsidy : — 'That the re cent circular from the Director of Agri culture dealing with additional subsidy to be paid to Agricultural, Pastoral, and Horticultural Societies is considered a re striction rather than an encouragement to the present sphere of usefulness of these societies. Clause 1 practically (de- ? mands that each society shall become a model farm. Clause 2 forms it into a de- { bating society. In Clause 3 dairying is ? confined to a few centres ; but it is prac- ? tically unknown in the large centres of the State known as 'Riverina.' Clause 4 is asking the society to usurp the func tions of the British Government in rela tion to the Shires. . . . Where the prizes are given by the Government, in stead of the societies being1 put to the great expense of arranging for the use of bulls and stallions. Under these circum stances the Deniliquin P. and A. Society moves that the Go...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE VICTORIAN YEAR BOOK OF AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

~^^^r ^^^r~^^r -^^r ^^^- ~^^ -^^ -^^r -^^ — ^^ THE VICTORIAN YEAR BOOK OF AGRICULTURE. From the Victorian Director of Agricul ture we have received a copy of the ' 'Year-Book of Agriculture,' issued by the Department for 1905. The work' is the first of its kind issued by the Gov ernment of the sister State, and a similar volume is to be issued each year. For reference purposes it should prove most valuable to the 'man on the land' in Aus tralia, as every subject likely to be of , '? practical interest to him is dealt with by experts. The present volume has educa tive articles on the following subjects:— Agricultural High Schools, Soils of Vic toria, Closer Settlement Studies, St. John's Wort, Irrigation on the Farm, Farm Homestead, . Artificial . Manures, Wheat, The Potato, Maize, Tobacco, Viti- , culture, Feeding of Farm Animals and £jt Modern Silage Methods, The Horse, Mule ^ Breeding, Dairy Farming, and Poultry, most of which have already- appeared in' the 'Journal of Agriculture...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AUSTRALIA'S FIRST SETTLER. A LEAF FROM EARLY COLONIAL HISTORY. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

AUSTRALIA'S FIRST SETTLER. A LEAF FROM EARLY COLONIAL HISTORY. By Charles White, author of 'Early Con vict Days,' etc. The first man to sow grain in Aus tralia, and the first to receive a grant of land and occupy and work it, was James Ruse, who came out to the colony — then only known as 'Botany Bay' — with the other convicts in the first fleet under Gov ernor rhillip in 17BS. Ruse had been convicted at Bodmin, and sentenced to seven years' transporta tion in 1782, so that when he landed here he had but a short time to serve. He had been a farmer in the Old Country, and he was doubtless counted in- amongst Gov ernor Phillip's convict charges on that very account, as also were other of the prisoners having practical knowledge of agriculture. The British authorities saw that the new land in the south would need such men if the settlement to be formed there was to become self-supporting, and they made choice from the prisoners in the hulks on the Thames of those best fitted for the 'e...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
P. & A. SOCIETIES' UNION CONFERENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

P. & A. SOCIETIES' UNION CONFERENCE. The following delegates have been ap- . pointed to attend the Pastoral and Agri- J cultural Societies' Union Conference at ' 1 Royal Chambers, on nth and 12th inst., I opening at 8 o'clock p.m. : — Gundagai. — James Mclnerney, Moreton Park S., Gundagai. Cootamundra.— T. Williams, G.-T. Att wood, James Roberts. m Singleton. — Hy. Tourke, Chestnut, Sin- 1 gleton. 1 Manildra.— T. H. Watson. _J I Narandera. — A. W. Austin. I Nimitybelle District Farmers' Union. — fl O. E. Silk. I Cooma. — J. C. Ryrie. I Bathurst. — W. L. Suttor, Eurowa, Bath- I urst; H. W. Webb, Bathurst. I Deniliquin. — R. H. Landale. 1 Orange. — W. Tanner. U Cobar.— Phillip Oakden, 'Lerida Stat- [I tion,' Cobar. - M Warialda. — Richard Capel, Gournama, w, Warialda. ? JL Hawkesbury District Agricultural So- jm ciety.— B. Hall, M.P., A. Tuckerman. m Albury.— Charles L. Griffith, Albury. ? If Berry. — Henry D. Morton, Coolangatta. Wk Yass.— W. Thomson, Yass. . M Dubbo.— F. Mac...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOUBLING THE PRODUCT. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

DOUBLING THE PRODUCT. He who brings forth two blades of grass where but one grew before per forms a greater service for humanity than he who builds a city. There is nothing new in this thought, for it has often been stated in similar words, but it will serve as a text in this as well as in the orig inal form. Causing two blades of grass to grow instead of one is doubling' the product, and if that can be done by the intelligent application to the soil of the fertilizer which the grass needs for its highest development, by a similar process all plants can be made to double their product, not only of leaves, but of seed and fruit with but little more labour and expense than their mere cultivation with out the use of fertilizers. To double the production of grain and grass renders easy the doubling of the output of live stock and poultry, and also by increasing the yield, the quality of the product is greatly improved, and the ground is ben efited by the unused fertilizing ingred ients,...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SUPERIOR ARTICLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

THE SUPERIOR ARTICLE. Emerson says : — Nature makes fifty poor melons for one that is good/ and shakes down a tree full of gnarled, wormy, unripe crabs before you can fine a dozen dessert apples; and she scatters nations of naked Indians and nations of clothed Christians, with two or three very good heads among them. Na ture works very hard, and only hits the white once in a million throws. In man kind she is contented if she yields one master in a century. The more difficul tj there is in creating good men, the more they are used when they come.

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE IMPORTANCE OF LUNG-ROOM IN DAIRY CATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

THE IMPORTANCE OF LUNG ROOM IN DAIRY CATTLE. The bovine lung possesses an enor mous amount of respiratory surface, every sing-le point of which vast surface is in constant and immediate contact with the atmosphere inspired. Let us then con sider the quantity of air which is being daily presented to this surface. It will, of course, vary according- to age, consti tution, and system of g-aining- a liveli hood. The quantity of air received by cattle at an ordinary inspiration without any effort at all and under excessive exer tion may vary very considerably ; therefore, the calculation is a little too difficult for the writer to take in hand at present. It would, however, be of inter est to know the amount, as on the amount of air received into the lungs of a dairy animal depends the constitutional vigor of the offspring, the length of life o.f the animal itself, and the producing qualities - are also considerably influenced, by the lung- power of the animal. * * * . With many dairy ca...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LACK OF HUMUS IN OUR SOILS. [Newspaper Article] — The Farmer and Settler — 4 April 1906

THE LACK OF HUMUS IN OUR SOILS. Mr. Potts, Principal of the Hawkes bury Agricultural College, is reported to have recently said that our soils require more humus. Dr. Maxwell, of Queens land, said the very same thing to the canegrowers of that State five years ago. How, may I be permitted to ask/ is this humus to be returned to the soil of this country? What will it cost the farmers per acre to carry out the experiment? These are important questions. * * * I am not in a position to say 'whether ever Dr. Maxwell has demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Queensland cane grower that: such a thing can be done profitably or not. Mr. Potts says : 'We require to establish a system of rotation by which we continually feed the soil with humus.' * * * Now, humus as we understand it com prises that part of the soil on which the axemen stood when brushing down the. vines and undergrowth of the scrub lands of this country thirty, fifty, or seventy years ago. It was composed of de cayed vegetab...

Publication Title: Farmer And Settler, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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