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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

ft 21 ' ' OUR NASCENT ALUMNATE. Those who are familiar with St. Benedict's Iyife, writ ten by Pope St. Gregory the Great, and with the Rule of the Holy Patriarch, are well aware that from the very be ginning of the Benedictine Order the saintly founder ad mitted in his Monastery of Monte Cassino young boys, whom their parents offered or confided to him to have them instructed in the various sciences, clerical and secular, as well as in the Monastic virtues.. St. Benedict did not, in deed, originate the cloistral schools, but he truly organized them on a firm and solid basis, as he did the religious life in the west. Who has not heard or read of the boys Maurus and Placidus, the sons of two Roman Patricians, Esty chins and Lestullus, whom their fathers presented to St. Benedict, the former when he was only fourteen, and the latter seven years of age? These two boys became after wards Benedictine Monks, the first propogators and, with St. Benedict himself, the great glory of the great...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

y 'ffiFWfl iw " '""TTf -w- 22 schools, or again scholasticates, jumorates, etc., etc. The atmosphere of the world is not congenial to the development of clerical and religious vocations, and frequently stifles and destroys the tender shoots which Almighty God had destined to grow into vigorous plants of His chosen vineyard. Ex perience and history prove that the most useful and capable members of religious communities have come forth from these Monastic schools. In 1892 an apostolic school was established at Sacred Heart Mission, and it gave to the Abbey some candidates who today are zealous priests and promising clerics of the order. But it gradually declined and was abandoned. During .the recent visitation of the Abbey and its dependent Missions by Rt. Rev. Abbot Leander, O. B., noticing the vast field of labor open before the Missionaries of Oklahoma and Indian Territories, and the scarcity of vocations, he urged upon the Fathers the necessity of reopening such a school, and the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

fa 23 earnestness and a good will, well worthy of the first flowers of this new institution, similar in this respect, that in their nascent condition act more powerfully than at any other time. May they all persevere, may their number rapidly increase, and may God bless a work undertaken for His sole glory, according to the Benedictine Motto, inscribed on the title page of the Indian Advocate: U. I. O. G. D., that God may be glorified in all things. LOCALS. The annual Retreat for the religious of Sacred Heart Abbey be gan Sunday, Nov. 26fch, and closed Sunday, Dec. 3rd. Friday, Dec. 8, feast of the Immaculate Conception, Rt. Rev. Bishop Meershaert laid hands in ordination on five of our ecclesiastical students : Fr. Maurus M. Fuerstenberg, O. S. B. and Fr. Timothy A. Murphy, O. S. B. were ordained sub-deacons. Fr. Gregory Gerrer, O. k S. B., deacon; RR. FF. Joachim Dougherty, O. S. B., and Ildephonse Elissalde, O. S. B., were raisen to the Holy Priesthood- The ceremo ny took place d...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

24 l short but very enjoyable entertainment, was given by tlie pupils of St. f Elizabeth's Convent. The Advocate extends congratulations, and i wishes the young Levites God's choicest blessings on their future career as ministers of Christ and dispensers of His mysteries. Frank Clayton, a student of Sacred Heart College, made his first h communion Sunday, December 17th. Very Eev. Dom Leo, O. S. 13., Prior of Sacred Heart, and Rev. D. Gratain, O. S. B , are at present in California, visiting their friends and countrymen in that state. Christmas examinations were held at Sacred Heart College from Monday, December 11th, to Saturday December 16th. The terminal results are given on page 25. Christmas recess began December 21st to end Wednesday, Janu ary 3d, 1900. Most students went home to spend their holidays. Sunday, December 10th, Rev. Dom Idlephonse, O. S. B., recently ordained, celebrated solemnly his first Mass at Sacred Heart Church, Oklahoma Territory. Deacon, Fr. Gregory, O. S. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

25 this report, he may hold the shingle, and we will cheerfully fire off the cannon. They say that the late Vice-President Hobart started in life with but $2.50 in his pocket. "Tata!" exclaimed some one. "I started in life without even a pocket." An old man who had been badly hurt in a railway accident was advised to sue the company for damages. "Nay! nay!" said he "I have had enough damages; I will just sue them for repairs " "The truth always pays in the end," is an old saying, and that is probably why there is so little of it told at the beginning of business transactions. A Frenchman, learning the English language, complained of the irregularity of the verb "to go," which, in the present tense, some wag had written out for him as follows: "I go; thou starts; he de parts; we lay tracks; you cut sticks; they obsquatulate or skedaddle." . A tired man who lays abed in the morning is not attired man. . 'ROW, OF HONOR, CHRISTMAS, 1899. Preparatory: C. Master, T. O'Day, Wm. Tender. Jun...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

i 26 BLESSED CASSIAN. In the xui chapter of his Rule St. Benedict prescribes, the Monks after their evening meal, whether dinner, on days of fast, or supper, on other days, shall assemble to gether and one of them shall read the Conferences, or Lives of the Saints or any other book calculated to edify. By the Conferences he alluded to the Conferences called the Collation of Gustitutions of Cassian, which form as the legendary Monastic code in the east and in the west. It must, therefore, be interesting to know who this Cassian is, and the present article is intended to give a short sketch of this celebrated man taken from the most reliable records. According to Germadins, Cassian was by birth a Scyth ian and became a Monk in one of the lauras of Bethlehem. After his long wanderings through the blessed solitudes of the east, he was ordained a Priest by St. John Chrysostom and became a member of the clergy. Exiled with the-Holy Patriarch of Constantinople, he went to Rome to plead the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

0 27 himself, a retired and penitential life. These anacorites, dwelling in separate bands, were for many centuries called Cassianites; their number increased so rapidly that it is said there was more than 5,000 at one time that recognized him as their superior or archimandrite. He made several foundations, around the grotto of St. Braume, at St. Maxi min, on the tomb of St. Mary Magdalene, at St. Zachary.'It was for them that he composed those admirable recitals known as His Conferences. He erected also a Monastery for women that became famous in the annals of the Church of Marseilles, and that in the origin was placed under the patronage of St. Cry. and later under that of the Holy Savior. The first Christians of Marseilles, after the edict of Antoninus, the Pious, enjoining on the governors of the Roman ' provinces to let in peace the followers of Christ, . ' and allowing them the free exercise of their religion, had chosen that retired spot for the place of their assemblies; the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

K 28 tery became in after times the well renowned Abbey of St. Victory, on the ruins of which stands today the Church of Notre Dame de la Garde. Cassian, after having long gov erned his numerous flock with zeal and glory, died in 448. He was buried in the catacombs of his abbatial Church, and his monument, adorned with beautiful sculptures, is pre served in the Borelli museum. His feast is. still kept in the diocese of Marseilles on the 23d of July, It has been ob jected that many of his writings savor of semi-pelagianism, but it must be borne in mind that the Holy Abbot wrote and maintained these false opinions about grace before any doctrinal decision had been promulgated by the infallible magisterium of the Church. Hence the Church has never protested against the local veneration shown to the great Abbot and Monastic Ruler of so many thousand religious who have edified the world by the example of their austeri ties and virtues. ,i , s , t

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

THE s A NDIAN ADVOCA T . JLji H Vol. XII. March, 1900. TO OUR READERS. No. 2. 01 f I HE first number contained a rather considerable amount JLof typographical errors. This was due to the double fact that the printing of the Indian Advocate had been entrusted to entirely new hands, and that they were not as yet fully equipped with the necessary materiel. Under the circumstances, we did the best we could, and we added an extra leaf with the u Errata." The present number is undoubtedly an improvement, in every respect, upon the former. It is the desire of the editors to make gradually the little review as perfect as may be expected, taking into consideration, however, the limited resources now at our disposal and the many obstacles, due to location and dis tance, that hinder our progress. We have received a num ber of letters, encouraging us in our undertaking and ex pressing satisfaction with the newly-adopted form as well as the program announced. Most of our subscribers have re newe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

30 The Indian Advocatk. welfare of the Indian, the diffusion of devotion to St. Bene dict, and zeal for the promotion of God's glory and of Catholic doctrine. Any questions addressed to the Admin istration concerning the Indians, our Institutions, Benedic tine works, houses, missions, &c, in the past or present, shall be carefully examined and fully answered, as soon as practical. We begin also in this issue to add for each month, a short notice of the Benedictine Saints whose feast is celebrated during that month. At the end of the second department will be found the calendar for March and April according to the Order of the Divine Office as recited by the members of the Cassinese Congregation of the Primitive observance and that will be its place in all following numbers. More lengthy biographies of the same Saints or .Blessed will be occasionally given in the last part of the Advocate. Though the first number had 28 pages, it is understood that each number is to contain only ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

The Indian Advocate. 31 v between Indian Territory and Texas on the south. The I population was the.i 68,152, of whom 2,407 were whites; 6,378 colored and 59,367 Indians. The white population was made up, almost entirely, of the agents upon the differ ent reservations, the garrisons at a few military posts, and ' p t employes of the railroads which cross the Territory. The Indians were tribes or parts of tribes (42 in all) which the y United States government has fiom time to time moved 1y, there and placed upon reservations, to the number of 25. ' White men, unless husbands of Indian women, were not allowed to settle within its boundaries, nor were Indians al lowed to go away, except on a pass from the agent of the reservation. The number of Indians in reservations or at ' agencies was 24,967, that of nomadic Indians was about 34,400. For the better understanding of the location of those various tribes we give below a map of the Territory, as constituted before 1889, to which we re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

32 The Indian Advocate. 5,024 square miles in the east-central part, bordering o.n the Cherokees and Choctaws. South-west of the Creeks was tlie small Seminole reservation (5), 586 square miles, and north of this the reservation of the Sac and Fox (6), 750 square miles, including the Otoes, Ottawas and Moko hoka's band. West of the Seminoles was a tract of 900 square miles, upon which were settled the Pottawatomies and Absentee Shawnees (Shawano) (7). The Osage reser vation (8), 2.345 square miles, was west of the Cherokees, bounded north by Kansas and south and west by the Arkan sas river. North-west of the Osages,and bounded north by Kansas and west by Arkansas, was the reservation of the Kaws (9) 156 square miles, to which they were removed from Kansas in 1873. In the south-west, bounded east by the Chickasaws, is the reservation of the Kiowa, Comanche, Apache and Delaware Indians (ro) 4,639 square miles, and north of this the reservation, 6,715 square miles, of the Cheyennes and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

This Indian Advocate. 33 fct The Oklahoma Country was founded on lands sold to the United States in 1866 by the Creeks and Seminoles, for r several millions of dollars, and when in 1884-85 Congress declared these lands open to homestead settlement, it granted to those Indians an additional requital of many millions. GREENWICH, fa 31 3& 3S 3 33 I to be continued. 9? 78 V Puguc Lanos . -CWjRJM-flN-- TNTiia7, "7VTTlhl .."""" ""( ICKKirOKT; bSFfiRE 80V. .H.MisW WHiHJNGTON. Z 15 Vt ! I ' ' j I I Ki MN 5 rffl Si , ,5 1 ' I ! 1 H, I i ,? 1 1 , ?$ , ,J v J 37 , Cherokee ' lw I Au' p ? OvTLtxi Lands. ftj(05ACE5.i ?' V$&22' sm . -v - - -y-SJVr- -J- v$r- h- b I of) )i u3) ' c;fCS' ! ' ! 1 1 I A c l 1 1 - f" " r ""i i " 1 1 1 i 11 1 , ' 11 1 1111 -j 1 1 1 . 1 i U ZZ Zt 20 19 18 17

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

34 The Indian Advocatk. AN ALUMNUS. TN THE first number of the Indtan Advocate for 1 1900, an article was devoted to Our Nascent Alumnate. Since January the number of our alumni has increased from six to nine. The young candidates wear a special dress, a black habit with a short scapular, in token of their consecration to God and of their desire to become one day religious in the Benedictine Or der, should God call them to that state. We take pleasure in presenting our subscribers with the picture of one of the first al umni. They wear a special cos tume only on Sundays and Holy days, and when assisting at the public religious services; they, attend class and walk about, on ordinary days, in civilian attire. It is understood that this habit, which they receive a few days after their admission into the Alumnate, implies no other Engagement but the one just stated, and is, in no sense, a monastic or clerical dress, not any more than the cassock, black, red or purple, of the sanctuary ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

35 SACRED HEART COLLEGE. The Indian Advocate. S r ----- mf- nssn fin gflin - V V monks REVER THE onks of St. Benedict take up their abode, you may be sure that, if not immedi ately, at least as soon as possi ble, thy open a school for the' r US.11L111 Ul Ull jytUJJiC ill L1JC11 immediate neighborhood, and frequently such a school de velops, in the course of time, into a College and even a University. The reputation of the Benedictines as efficient teachers and disciplinarians is universally known to all those who are ever so little acquainted with the past history of the Great Order during well-nigh fourteen centuries. Father Robot, a French Benedictine, was Indian Territory's first Missionary. In 1876 he founded Sacred Heart Mis sion, and within twelve years erected the present monastery, built several churches and schools throughout the vast exteut of what was then Indian Territory. Among others, he opened here in 1878, a day school which gradually in creased its sphere of usefuln...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

36 This Indian Advocatk. 100m. Another door admits to the corridor in which are rooms for the treasurer, sleeping and dining apartments with a reception room for visitors. On the other side is the laboratory, photographic gallery and music room. The main corridor leads to the right into the study hall and class room. A rear door opens upon the yard separating the Alumnate from the College; and in this yard there is a well, furnishing the best water to be found on the premises. A large stair-case in the conidor conducts to a spacious dormitory, which may be utilized, and has been on various occasions, as entertainment hall. Two other stair-cases give admittance into this dormitory, one on the outside ad mits into it from the above s'aid yard and would be invalu able in case of fire. The other leads into the monastery,., proper by a small passage where are an Infirmary and small ' private rooms for boarders and professors. The students have two large play grounds, one at some distance...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

Thr Indian Advocate. 37 A moderately comfortable circumstances. As to the course of studies, it is thorough, comprehensive and eminently prac tical. Owing to the peculiar circumstances of its location, Sacred Heart College is at once primary, commercial and secondary school. There are boys ranging from the age of six to that of twenty years. In the primary department, to which most male children of the neighborhood belong, the curriculum embraces spelling, reading and elementary arith metic, penmanship, catechism and bible history. In the higher department, students follow the commercial or the classical course. A number of young men have graduated from the former in the past five years and are now successful business men in the Territories and elsewhere. The College is especially a suitable place for delicate young men, since its location is unsurpassed for health and the picturesque beauty of the landscape; also for boys who are slow and whose progress has been retarded for some r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

38 The Indian Advocate. removed from all the distracting influences of a city to secure that seclusion which is so necessary for the prosecu tion of studies; yet it is not too remote to enjoy its con veniences and accommodations. While parents confiding to us their children .do not expect to find here all the latest improvements that may be found in the great Colleges of the principal cities of the country, they appreciate that their children, though possessing all the advantages neces sary to keep their 'bodies healthy, can receive here an edu cation free from the too great indulgence and comfort that in no way tend to turn out men capable of endurance, sacrifice and enterprise, such as the educational institutions of past ages have given to the world. uIn this country every one gets a mouthful of. educa tion," said Th. Parker, "but scarcely any one a full meal." Sacred Heart College aims at giving to its scholars a full meal of education; what is taught, is taught thoroughly; the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

" The Indian Advocate. 39 FACETICE. Shakespeare never repeated. A little boy in Oklahoma resembled the bard in this particular, lie thoughtlessly twisted a mule's tail. "How could you think of calling auntie stupid ?" a mother asked her boy. "(Jo to her immediately and tell her you are sorry.". Leo goes to auntie and says: "Auntie, L am sorry you are so stupid." "Is that marble?" said a gentleman, pointing to a bust of Ken tucky's great statesman. "No. sir; that's Clay," quietly replied the dealer. An advertiser in Texas calls for an industrious man as a boss hand over live thousand head of sheep that can speak Spanish fluently. A musician, Gregory Sharp, had his name on the door thus: "G-. Sharp." A wag of a painter who knew something of music, made the following undeniable and significant addition: "Is A flat." Tommy does not like fat meat. One clay the steak was very fat. "Tommy," asked the prefect, "will you not have some beefsteak?" "Yes, sir, but I don't want any that has pork...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1900

4o The Indian Advocate. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Published by the Sonodictine fathers OF Sacred Heart mission, Oklahoma Territory. ;: A Bi-Monthly Review under the protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Rev. Theo. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Okla homa and Indian Territories. Entered as second-class mail matter at Sacred Heart Postoftice. O. T. TERMS: Single Copies ... loc. Annual Subscription f0c. Fifteen or more copies sent to one and same address, each 35c. Foreign 00c. PRIVILEGES 1. Every subscriber and benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the religious at Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every first Friday of the month in honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of subscribers and benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every first Saturday of the month for our departed friends, subscribers and benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masse...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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