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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

The Farmer's Best Fowl. By S. M. Shipley. The Barred Plymouth Rocks, since their first introduction to the poultry world by D. C. Upham, of Wilsonville, in the year 1867, have steadily forced their way to the front among the estab lished breed's of thoroughbred poultry, until they stand today second to none in popular esteemj as an all-purpose fowl. That this is the popular verdict none who are familiar with the show records of the country—at which they never fall in being the most numerous ly represented variety —will deny. So far, at least, they are generally recog nized as America's first and greatest contribution to the list of standard bred poultry. *** In general characteristics they are typical of the whole American class; the individuals of which as fully meet the general requirements of an "all purpose" or utility bird as can well be required. In the Barred Rock a high standard of ideality" has been estab lished, and it is not to be wondered at that breeders of the younger ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

12 Wheat Outlook. Argentine has now shipped 4,175,000 bushels of wheat to Europe since Jan uary 1, against 364,000 bushels during the same period last year. New South Wales has turned out 9,745,375 bushels, Victoria 7,437,000, South Australia about 4,000,000, Queensland 1,000,000, and the other colonies about 1,500,000, making a total of 23,750,000 bushels; the food requirements are 21,000,000 bushels, and for seed, 3,500,000 bushels. All the indications seem to point to a good price and market for wheat. The Corn Trade News of February 8, says: "In the United Kingdom; stocks wheat by next week will probably be down below the million level, and this in the middle of the season, with the new crop six months off. Whichever way one looks at the future of supplies there can only be one conclusion, viz., that the consumer is running all the chances." PUREBRED POULTRY I have now for sale eggs of the fol lowing standard breeds: PARTRIDGE COCHIN $1.00 per 18. ROSE COMB WYANDOTTES 7. ri cent...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

THE HARKETS. SEATTLE. In general the markets have been steady this past week and prices re main largely the same. Jobbing quotations; what produce is selling at in round lots. Potatoes are firm. Yakimas, $13@ 14% per ton; natives, $11@13. Beets, per sack, 75c; turnips, 50c; car rots, $7 a ton; celery, 35@40c per doz; hothouse lettuce, 45c;' radishes, 10c; onions, $50@60 per ton; cabbage, l%c per. lb for California; 2c for native; parsnips, per sack, 65@75 cents; caliilflowe'r, $1 per doz; rhubarb, 10c per lb; beans, 2%@3%c. Honey, very light Nevada, 14c; native, 10@12c. Apples are plentiful, which has a tendency to make them a little weaker, though there is no change in the prices. Most of them are coming from Oregon; one car load came from Yakima this past week. The very best Spitzenberg apples are selling at $2; Baldwin,; $1@ 1.50; native, 75c@$l; green apples, 50@ 75c; red apples, 75c@51.25. Millstuffs— Bran, per ton, $17; shorts, per ton, $18@19. V Feed— Chopped feed, $18@20 per...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

14 A Cold Frame for Early Vege tables. The cold frame is simply a box of any kind of lumber without a bottom. A good size for such frame is three by six feet. This should be made one foot high on one side and eighteen inches on the other, with the ends prop erly tapered to meet the different height of the sides. We indicate this size because it is handier to store away when not in use c although the length is not a matter of consequence, as the cold frame may be made as long as required, but should never be more than three feet wide. The frame should be set on the ground in a place sheltered from cold winds, with the lowest side facing the south. Then the soil inside should be dug and fined as for planting, and on top of this place six inches of very rich soil, or soil made rich with rotted manure, chip dirt or any similar soil. For the cover, instead of using costly and easily broken glass, use ordinary muslin, choosing the strong est that can be bought. Make a light frame of furri...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

knife, leaving the soil adhering to the roots as much as possible. If the weather is not yet warm enough to keep the cold frame warm, the plants should be set out in boxes one inch apart each way to stand until they can be put in the cold frame. If the co.>. frame is banked up on the outside with coarse manure, and an old carpet or similar covering, is thrown over the muslin cover during chilly nights, young plants may be put into it when the weather is quite cool. When this is done they should be put about two inches apart each way, and allowed to stand until they begin to crowd each other, unless warm weather comes before they get so large. Finally, they are transplanted from the cold frame into the open ground, and are ready to begin growing vig orously at once, for the repeated transplantings will have given them a strong root growth and so hardened them that they will not stand without growing as transplanted plants often do. 'iiV Don't say all this is too much trouble, for ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF *_»_E=»_R_A_3T _e=»tj_\_:_==»s IN THE MARKET. Bean Hydrolio Pump, yermorel Nozzle. Sv- /'',.' - ■•--. „ op Nozzel Myers Bucket £, MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO., 308-310 First Aye- South. Seattle, Wash. ►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ •••••••• •••#-***_••••••••• ••«>«•••••♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»» 1892 VASHON COLLEGE ,898 BURTON, WASHINGTON, Classical, Scientific, Normal and Commercial Courses. ——— ALSO . Musical, Elocutionary and Preparatory. Open to both Sexes. All Denom inations. Military Training for Boys and Young Men. ..... , . FREE TEXT BOOKS. NO EXTRAS. Healthful Location. Convenient to Seattle and Tacoma. $175 pays tuition, board Room, Light and Heat for FORTY WEEKS. Teachers' Summer Normal, six weeks, total expense, $25. For Catalogue and Announcements address a postal card to PHBS. A. C. JOHES, Ph." D.

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

kAwch And Range *W -§|f ISSUED EVERY WEEK "ikr .: ' -- . ; lflf_7 * Vol-3,'. No. 50. ■3 Largest Assortment in the Pacific Northwest of f j AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS I 3 Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines, I j"**'""""""" fc I EVERYTHING THAT A FARHER NEEDS. | I What do You Think of This: | .3 "Baby" De Laval Hand Separators, Capacities Increased ____SP^ ' ______] lIHOrOVC YOUf DSIFICS. _F ••• I nan Before... wtm jM mm^^TmmmWmr'mmW»*mn*^ fact Is too well known. Storekeepers over the country |H^ wM _______K_____f^-ll _■ now actually obliged to farm Baby No. 3.—Guaranteed 675 pounds per hour _B_L_l__nV^^^*_ _^S B__Jf_l_P_ there is no market for It. It does not, as a rule, come up to the fc^ _KB|w \ l*^ML_P _P'*^ standard of the public taste, and ere long 11 will be Impossible to "^J Baby No. I—Guaranteed 250 pounds per hour. .„■ JET _^--->-~- ''" phase of the butter question, some farmers are now selling out ■"^JI £■- _-_-_-___;*»-«_'r°" _1 _n»S9___«-l\ their milk cows, which me...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

2 T^VO you contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on application. Engines, x^^^ THRESHERS, Tanks, -JET fi^i^^^^^^^^^!^_^^-=:*^_3l STACKERS ' Saw Mills, ffßJ^ l|§|jjff horse powers. | THE "RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner, write us for particulars. Russell & Co., Portland, Oregon. 320=324 Belmont Street, 160= 166 East First Street. The Annie Wright Seminary, Tacoma, Washington. attended this school in -7 " Jfnl N \\^ man included in annual ._ft_H_-i^____i3^- f _______________ It has an income from Mrfi "11--H-ip^"*^^i-^™^ an endowment fund of f■ j X('-m Bplf^F wg]j $lliP^|^, <t d thi t ___-i it* -'--^ r^^ltir*iNi_^ Labratory, library, ■J*^^_______________ta***" '"" ~ _■ __^______ ESP-- *J *^c4rittb__l This is the School you are looking for t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

RANCH AND RANGE. Vol. 3, No. 50. The Prospect for Western Washington Farmers in 1898. The season at present is almost ideal for farm work. The great bulk of our products of last lall are now disposed of, and at reasonable prices, the great Alaska demand Having been, and still being of great benefit to us. Tne mild season enables us to get our land in cultivation, early, enabling us to have a cnance to harvest early. l_et us not forget, the first and last in the market generally ootain the best prices; lor such there is almost a certainty tor demand. Our last crop prices compare well with those of a tew former years. Totatoes have averaged about $9 per ton; baled hay, $10; onions, $40 a ton; milk, 10c a gallon, and best of all, there has been a demand for it, and still is. Alaska is being carried "by storm." Thou sands are going in, weekly adding to the thou sands already there. Those will have to be sup plied. Vegetables are in demand and will be in great demand, and out evaporators...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

4 THE STORY OF ALFALFA. By Lute Wilcox. Alfalfa is the greatest forage plant the world has ever known, and it should be grown by every farmer who keeps a cow or owns a horse. It is known scientifically as medicago sativa, its botanical name. In the Spanish language it is alfalfa, while the French, Swiss, German and Canadian people call it lucerne. It is a legu minous perennial, and properly belongs to the pea-vine family. It is often miscalled a grass. Its term of existence has not been authentically established, but it will last the average age of man, and instead of depleting the soil it has a way, through its root nodules, of constantly re plenishing the soil with the nitrogenous fertil izing elements of the atmosphere. The writer once met a venerable padre of Old Mexico, who said his alfalfa patch had been planted over two hundred years, and had never TYPICAL SCENE IN THE PALOUSE: Half a million bushels of wheat awaiting shipment at Pullman, Wash. been re-seeded during that time...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

plowed deep, and if not to be irrigated should be subsoiled. With sandy land over very por ous subsoil, where irrigation is not practiced, good success often results from seeding on sod. On land of this nature thorough surface prep aration without subsoiling will probably give the most satisfactory results. In starting alfal fa the first point claiming consideration is the selection and preparation of the soil. The plowing should, if possible, be done in the fall, and in the arid regions the use of the subsoil plow is almost an imperative necessity. Without a dense and uniform stand of plants it is not possible to make a high quality of al falfa hay. If the stand is thin on the ground the stalks will 'be coarse, woody and indigesti ble, and in curing, the leaves will dry and fall off before the stems are sufficiently cured. But if the stand is thick, the stems will be fine, and the foliage will be so abundant that the curing process can be effected evenly and without per ceptible lo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

6 POULTRY RAISING AT YAKIMA. Leonard Schott who, for a number of years has been prominently identified with one of the leading business houses in North Yakima, lias developed into a chicken fancier of the most irrepressible type. An enterprising reporter of the Yakima Republic visited Mr. Schott's famous farm near the edge of that thriving Central Washington metropolis and in the next issue tells thus entertainingly of what he saw: "All those little chickens in the garden," is the song Leonard Schott eternally sings as be pets, feeds and tinkers with about 400 fluffy bunches of fowl life of the barred Plymouth Rock variety, these sunny days. Three incubators are running daily opposi tion to the ancient hen on this fancy chicken ranch, and the profits in the business may be assumed from the pathetic remark of the pop ular fancier to a reporter on Monday, when one of the chicks turned over on its back and chirped its last. "There goes 40 cents," said Mr. Schottand he sighed and . the ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

OUR RANGE PASTURES. One of the most important questions before the rangeman of the Northern New West is the proper division of the range pasturage. It was a subject quite fully discussed at the recent Denver convention, and the general expression of opinion showed a sentiment in favor of ced ing these lands to the states and permitting them to dispose of them as they saw fit. The value of these lands is regarded as worth a cent an acre to cattle men; sheep men will give as high as five cents per acre. In Wyoming, for example, it takes forty acres to support a steer. The lowa Experiment Station reports show that 800 pounds of sheep will consume the grass that will support a thousand pounds of steer, or, in other words, sheep consume twenty-five per cent more grass than cattle of equal weight. We presume, however, that when the cession takes place, as it will sooner or later, the cattle men will conclude that the lands are worth more than one cent an acre; two cents, possi bly three. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVERY SATI'HUAY. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen Of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah' British Columbia. published BY THE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. Editorial Offices, - - Z • Seattle, Wash. business offices: Seattle, ... 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. SUBSCRIPTION, IN ADVANCE, - $1,00 PER YEAR. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. A well known cattle breeder, while in the East not long since, saw shipped out from a breeding farm to a man in Oregon a Shorthorn bull, which by the time it reached its destina tion, cost the purchaser in the neighborhood of $300. Now it is a fact that, just as good ani mals could have been purchased from a local Shorthorn breeder for from $65 to $75, as it was far from being an animal of the best type. The Eastern Shorthorn breeder was a scoun drel, the buyer was a sucker. It is worthy of encourag...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

OUR BOYS AND GIRLS Over thirty-five millions of our population are engaged in agriculture, and the other thirty five millions are dependent upon their success for prosperity. Consequently, when agricul ture fails or declines for a season, every other human pursuit languishes also. It would cer tainly seem that an occupation of such vital importance, not only in our own country, but in all nations and all ages, Should have been held in universal honor and carried to greater per fection than all others; yet the very reverse of this appears to be the case. The American farmer in all his planning and all his building has never made provision for life's happiness. He has only considered the means of getting a living. Outside of this everything relating to society and culture has been steadily ignored. The fanner gives his children the advantage of schools, not recognizing the fact that those very advantages call into life a new set of social wants. A bright, well educated family in the l...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

10 . FEEDING CALVES. By A. K. Hyatt, Sheboygan, Wis. 1 ought to know enough to give most excel '■•. uvice about feeding calves. Excepting the three years I helped Mr. Lincoln "'put down" the rebellion, I have, since I was ten years old, fed calves about as regularly as I have milked, and have milked about as regu larly as I have eaten my supper and breakfast, making about fifty-five years of experience. My average for over half of that time has been over twenty calves. I graduated as a calf breed er on the morning of my fourteenth birthday at my father's. There had come a big bull calf that would not own me as its mother; my fin gers did not seem to taste as he expected they would. Bite and bunt he would, but suck my fingers he would not. I called the calf names and said "ha! ha! I'll show you, I will."—l straddled him to shove him to a corner, put my arms around bis neck and surged back. We went out of an unlatched door, eight feet down into an April barnyard, I underneath. The cal...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

DISEASES OF CATTLE. Delivered before the Stockmens' con vention at Pendleton, Ore., by Dr. Withycombe, state veterinarian of Ore gon. As the/ subject, "Diseases Affecting Cattle," has. been assigned to me, I take it for granted that those diseases affecting cattle in this section of the state will be the most appropriate of which we speak. It is well known to the stock breeders of Eastern Oregon that there is no cattle disease that ex tensively or even seriously affects the cattle interests of this section. Probably the most prevalent disease, which occasionally makes its appear ance among your cattle, is black quar ter or black leg. This disease is some what similar in character to anthrax, although not nearly so infectious or serious. It is a specific disease, de pending upon bacilli for its propaga tion and development. Anthrax and black leg are diseases which are usu ally confined to certain localities, such as moist, undrained swampy places, or lands containing large amounts of...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

13 THE MARKETS. Lots of apples coming in from all over. Many lots must be sold at any price, because they will not keep. Quotations: "* Potatoes, Yakima. Livestock—Steers, 4@4£c; sheep, 4@4-jc; hogs, live, 4£c; dressed, 6c; veal, 5@7-Jc. A car of honey from San Francisco is being sold in the Sound cities. Eggs, strictly fresh, 12c. Butter, fresh ranch, 15@ 18c; creamery, 23@ 25c. Native onions are $60 per ton; kiln dried sell as high as $75. Parsnips, 75@90c a sack. Ranch eggs selling at 14@15c. CASH GRAIN AND HAY MARKET. Receipts of hay continue to keep a little ahead of the demand, with several cars of low grade, weather beaten and water soaked timothy and wild hay scattered through the railroad yards rejected and unsold. The demand, or rather the opportunity to work this kind of hay off on to stockmen has passed and owners will find it a very difficult matter to dispose of it at all. While Seattle is relatively the highest priced hay market in the United States, at same time her ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

THE YOUNQ COLT If you chance to be on hand at its first ad vent into the world, see that its nose is uncover ed soon after its body is exposed to the air. There may be cases where the navel needs attention, but nature usually takes care of that. Now leave it alone awhile, let the "dam take care of it, and after two or three hours, if it has not ob tained any milk, help it to get some. At a few days of age the colt is a natural born kicker, if touched on the back, but keep your hands oil' its back and it will soon forget it. At a week of age halter it and tie it up; it has got to have a few pulls the .first time it is tied, whether it is a week, a month or a year old, so commence on it soon. It is not old enough to hurt anything yet, and by the time it is two weeks old have it taught to lead and stand tied while its moth er is taken from the barn to water. I keep the mare in a box stall for a time previous to par tuition; after that, or by the time I commence tying the colt, I keep h...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 19 March 1898

14 TO THE POULTRYMEN. The present State Fair commission is com posed of men who recognize the poultry in dustry for what it is worth, and they have ap pointed the undersigned superintendent of tin poultry department at the State Fair, and au thorized linn to secure a judge of national repu tation, and to offer the following prizes: Best display, first, $10; second, $5. Best display of Bantams, first, $3; second, $2. ■ Best ten birds in the show, first, $5; second $3. Best collection in each variety, first, $3; sec ond, $1. Best live males, first, $3; second $2. Best hen in each variety, first, $2; second, $1. Best cock in each variety, first, $1; sec ond, 50 c. Besa cockerel in each variety, first, $; sec ond, 50c. Best pullet in each variety, first, $1; second, 50c. Such a prize list has never before been offered in the state. In addition to these prizes offered by the Fair Association, the breeders through out the state have been requested to donate such prizes as they may see fit...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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