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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

Sheep as Weed Destroyers. Prof. Thomas Shaw. When the writer first visited the western country in 1891, the extent to which weed growth prevailed on its farms was a matter of surprise. This was not because no weeds grew in Ontario, where I used to live, but because weeds grew more numerous ly and more vigorously in this north western country. On going back to Ontario a letter was written to a Chi cago paper expressing the view that western farms were greatly overrun with weeds. This let to some cross flring from this side of the line. What was my offense at that time? It was calling attention to the fact that weeds prevailed in the north western states to an extent that was discreditable to the farming. The sting lay not in the fact that these words were not true, but in the fact that they were uttered by a man who was then a Canadian, or to use other language, by one who came from an other country, and a country that grew to an extent what was unequaled elsewhere in America, the ag...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

12 THE FIELD Conserving the Moisture. The conservation of moisture by cul tivation is based on well-established principles. During a rainstorm or an irrigation the water received by the soil naturally moves downward. As soon as the supply from above ceases and the free water settles away the movement of the moisture in the soil sets in the opposite direction, mov ing upward as well as downward. As the moisture reaches the surface it passes off as vapor. Only by prevent ing the water reaching the surface can this evaporation be checked. The capillary action by which the water reaches the point where it evaporates can move only in close'y packed soil through innumerable, minute, irregu lar tubes. Breaking up these tubes checks this upward movement. Light cultivation not only breaks up the capillary tubes of the surface but forms a mulch that prevents rapid evaporation. The moisture will then rise to the mulch but cannot pass be yond it by capillary action and evaporation thus proceeds...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

LEGAL NOTES B. J. BORYEK This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free In these columns. If a reply by letter Is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer. care The Ranch. Private Ways of Necessity.—The owner of any land, which does not abut on any highway, or which is so situated that it is necessary to cross the land of others to obtain a reason able way to any public highway, may obtain the location and establishment of a road between his or their said lands and the highway by petition of the court of the county in which the lands over which such proposed road is to run are situated. Mortgages. —Mortgages may be made upon all kinds of personal pro perty and upon growing crops and on portable mills. A mortgage of personal property is void as against creditors of the mort gagor or subsequent purchaser, and incumbrances of the property for value and in good faith, unless it is accompanied by the affidavit of the m...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

14 LIVE STOCK Canadian "Beef Rings." Instead of a beef trust. Canada has beef rings. These are not, as the name might indicate, combinations for the control of the production and sale of beef, but groups of farmers who co operate to supply their tables with fresh meat during the summer. Ac cording to a report from our consul at Collingwood, the ring is usually composed of 16 or 20 members, al though sometimes as many as 40 are included. Each member agrees to sup ply one beef animal during the sum mer, and in order to give plenty of time for preparation the members draw lots the previous winter to determine the order in which they shall con tribute animals. After drawing, mem bers may exchange numbers if they find it mutually advantageous. Two small families may combine for one share. The system has given excellent re sults, as is shown by the fact that it is difficult to gain admission to the rings, and there is no inclination to drop out. The farmers' wives and daughters are partic...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

adds to the value of not only the poor ones, but also the good ones. The Small Stock Ranch. The impression is prevailent that only extensive capitalists can operate a stock ranch in the west to an ad vantage. In former years, a large number of domestic animals were own ed and controlled by one management and roamed over great areas of graz ing land in quest of food. The aver age amount of land apportioned to an animal under such conditions was measured by not less than thirty acres. Free range on free soil was the watch word of those early days. By the co-operation of a few large companies, expenses were reduced to a minimum. Fencing was not necessary by such management, as the round up two or three times a year restored to each owner any of his catle that might have strayer away. In one sense, a policy of extravagance grew up in the ideas of such ranchmen. In some cases not even salt was bought for the stock, to say nothing of hay or grain. The cowherd of ancient days was su perced...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 August 1904

16 FALL AND WINTER r— 1 Dairvina the Most Profitable Therefore get into shape to take, ad ._, uairymg me IWIU^I r rum* vantage 0 it, if you are still without a &2lpil& separator. Butter is going up in price, step by step, every month, hence separator cream v V:'^L follows its footsteps. If you have three or four cows it is time for you to get started in the yH^\ dairy business in a modern manner. The first question you will ask yourself will be, How ? , jy~;\ much is it going to cost?" Well, you can buy a J^Jl TUBULAR CREAM SEPARATOR /\ /" —j^lSfiljll^ *'or $50.00. It will save enough from five cows in one year to pay for itself. You can also S^^Miiiiflfir^'Bilk buy it on easy terms. The second question will be, "What machine shall I buy?" And f^^ijfjjf. llPl!^ this we desire to answer for you. We presume you want one that runs easily, or, in fact, I i * fifmf/l Hliil tne one t^iat runs the lightest of any. Just try some other makes by turning the crank; then Ul* V-S/l I Mt|...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. NO. 17. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, SEPTEMBER 1, 1904. FRANK 1.. WHEELER. Who, with A. J. Pitner, Has Hought the Commission Business of M. C. Naseeii & Co., of Seattle. See Article on luge 5. 50c per Year 5c the Copy.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

0 What Is Your Ambition? • WHATEVER IT IS WE CAN HELP YOU. Our graduates arc iii law offices; they are in business offices; they are in railroad, steamship and express offices; they are in city, county and state offices; they arc managing up-to-date farms of their own. PERSONALLY OR BY MAIL WE CAN AID YOU TO REALIZE YOUR AMBITION. EXPERIENCES AU subscribers are invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. To Kill Off Gophers.—ln the issue for August Ist A. O. Lee asks for something better than steel traps to get rid of those little gophers that gnaw the roots off the trees. A fair quantity of broken up giass mixed info the soil will do the work, and will remain effective indefinitely. It has proved a success for me for five years. If any one of The Ranch read ers knows what is good to stop the mice from gnawing the bark of fruit trees under the snow I wou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

THE RANCH Office:' 38 Downs Building. „S MM I I If FREEMAN . Editor and Proprietor, .'.. V I*. L. AXLIISG ------ . Assistant Editor . .] Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. . H. L. BLANCHARD. :'-. Issued the First and Fifteenth Each Month. Subscription, ln advance, one year, 60 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. : Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account .. of local postage. _„ ' y' ' . ..*'"", '.*. Agents wanted ln every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. • . . ■ The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue- is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as .we cannot find lt on our list from the name alone on the paper. We. must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscript...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES Reeky Ford Melons in Washington. The growing of Rocky Ford cante loupes in the Yakima valley is an in dustry but lately engaged in, yet it has assumed large proportions and promises to be one of the features of the valley. The Richey & Gilbert Co. has been shipping canteloupes to the eastern markets. At the outset they es timated that they would have an ag gregate of 22,500 crates and expected the melons to net an average of one dollar per crate. This firm has some 150 acres in melons and figured on get ting 150 crates to the acre. The Rocky Ford melons from Colorado reach the Chicago and eastern markets before those from Washington, hence the price for the Washington product will be lower than the former. The busi ness of raising these melons in the Yakima valley received a strong impe tus last spring by the visit to that sec tion of Mr. Landreth, representing the commission houses of M. O. Coggins at Pittsburg, Chicago and New York. Mr. Landreth induced a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

creasing quantities of our common fruits? In concluding these lengthened pages may l say to you: In growing your orchard there will come to you recompense other than dollars and cents, a recompense of health and added years, a feeling that you have mastered every adverse condition; and when your trees that you have grown and loved are burdened with great harvests, will you not rejoice that you have been a factor in a fruition so no ble, so beautiful? Puyallup Valley Berry News. From The Tribune. The cannery is turning out 700 gal lon cans of blackberries daily. A crate of blackberries will average about six gallon cans of prepared fruit. Two wagon loads of berries come in from Sumner every day, consigned to the cannery. Snyder blackberries are drying up badly, owing to the hot weather. Their season will be short. If the cannery had a sufficient amount of berries, it could turn out from 1,200 to 1,500 gallon cans daily. The association is giving 90 cents a crate for first class dewbe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

fi THE DAIRY Essentials to Creamery Success. In the last number of The Ranch something was said upon the unprofi tableness of establishing a number of small creameries in any district that could profitably support but one or two. Additional material on the same sub ject has been secured and will be given herewith. In at least four specific sec tions in this state there is talk, of-es tablishing an opposition creamery be cause the patrons think they have a grievance of one kind or another against the factory already in existence in each section. It is to be regretted that there should be anything to dis rupt the harmonious co-operation be tween patron and factory management, and The Ranch believes concessions on both sides —meeting each other half way, so to speak—would do much to bring all parties together and, in the end make the creamery already established a much stronger institution than could be done by rushing into the estab lishment of another factory. Washing ton is not the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

material can be introduced with im punity to future quality. We knew a dairyman once who, in a spasm of economy (?), sought to save 50 cents by purchasing a cheaper grade of salt than was his wont, and later lost on his shipment of butter thereby $7. It was one of the most effective lessons he could have been taught in practical dairying, exemplifying as it did that cheap material always pro duces cheap quality. When it comes to cheese making, salt holds just as im portant a position as in other dairy lines, i. c., that solubility and purity are highly necessary. Conway's New Creamery. The new creamery at Conway will open for business in the very near fu ture. The building, which was begun last spring, is already completed, and the necessary machinery has been in stalled. John Finstad is the proprietor of the new creamery. He and a part ner, P. K. Utgard, own and operate two creameries in the state of Wisconsin. For the present Mr. Utgard will re main in Wisconsin looking after thei...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, Ellensburg. Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Hints. Boiling water will remove tea stains. Spirits of camphor or ammonia will remove white spots from furniture. To take red ink out of white linen rub with tomatoes and wash as usual. One teaspoonful of ammonia to one cup of water applied with a rag will clean silver and gold jewelry. Paint in wool or cotton can be re moved by covering the spot with but ter and then applying chloroform. Rub lamp chimneys with a news paper which has been slightly damp ened with kerosene. Better than soap. Always rub .your hot irons in salt before using them on fine starched goods. It cleans them better than wax. To increase the gloss and make gar ments iron easier, when preparing the starch make it in suds of toilet or white soap, instead of clear water. . A good prepara...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

SECOND Call or Write to EVERYTHING LARGEST I^l_ i \ _^*1 /o\ V^ KNOWN music House 9n€Fin&n 9 . U&y (c 2 i^O. « IN Ami RICA 711 SECOND AVENUE, for ANYTHING IN the MUSIC line. MUSIC . ; _ ... . , ' . ■ __ ■ jWBK j ! I HELLER PIANOS f*tWAJ~s^--^-i'' vSi-J^T^T'^'^^^^i^^^^^ 1119 .What the "Presto," Chicago's leading musical journal, has to say for the Mil IIX & CO. I'iuno: "<^^eS^^ d |g.:g "The IIKI.I.EK & ia>. piano is manufactured bj Winter .\ to., al Nos. 101-J and lu_!o Southern te^SJ-^SCB**.-^ "^^*^**3S.Si^_^_fßbl*'W -_fl_l «** Boulevard, New York. The present manufacturers acquired the business of Heller & Co. several years TBS' ~ittsjjS^*^^^Tfmi''T|'i'iiin*" *^^^^*tTli#lmsmm\ "Fi \\ ag °' '' '" pianos have caused more tavorable comment in the trade than lias the Heller & Co. It has '•'•cß-'SIIBStSSSs^^ ---„. ""'■" '''to^s^Htt'filwl made a notable record and Is a leading instrument in tie. wani us of many of the most prominent ' A KM_■ j^B^^^^^^^t^^^^T...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

10 POULTRY H. L. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. The Care of the Duckings. Art. V.Mrs. Octavius Allen It is sometimes a little difficult to know exactly what to do with your finished ducklings when you intend keeping them lor stock. If they are to be kept in a small yard there is but little trouble, but as the profit on ducks is not so much greater where the old birds?, i. c., the breeders, can have a large range they should all be turned loose to hunt up their liv ing as soon as it is possible. Ducks are so nervous that they cannot be treated like other domestic fowls. They will stampede and pile like sheep at the least unusual movement and will scratch each other's backs and break each other's wings and ribs and become generally unmanageable. I have found it a good plan when I intend entirely renewing irty stoc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

Control of the Water Supply In a recent issue of the. Yakima Herald appeared the following: "H. B. Scudder informed The Herald that Walter N. Granger, manager of the Washington Irrigation company and secretary of the state irrigation commission, had authorized him to say that he and his company are in favor of the national government controlling and distributing the surplus waters of the Yakima watershed by conservation in the lakes at the head of the rivers. He also stated that he and his com pany would -assist the people in every way possible to secure legislation to bring about this result. ' This is an: important announce ment, especially so in view of the fact that the Washington Irrigation com pany and Mr. Granger have heretofore been regarded as opposed to govern ment control of surplus water. That corporation is the largest water con sumer in the valley and if it is will ing that the national government shall control the surplus it is believed the smaller consumers will more...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

12 THE FIELD Pacific Coast Wheat Yield The preliminary estimate of the federal department of agriculture of the Washington winter wheat yield is 11.426.061 bushels, which is nearly 4,000,000 bushels larger than the ac tual crop of 1903. It is said the enor mous crop of this year is not due so much to an increased acreage as to a phenomenal yield. This yield of 11,426,061 bushels of winter wheat averages more per acre than that of any other state in the union. The de partment places it at 26.3 bushels. Idaho is a close second with 26.2 bush els, while the average for the whole country is placed at 12.3 bushels. Of course, the figures, both as to total yield and as to the average, are liable to be somewhat modified, owing to the attack of black rust in many sec tions, but approximately they are cor rect, for purposes of comparison. It might be well to call attention to the fact that winter wheat conditions on the Pacific coast are in striking con trast to those which obtain in other p...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

$ WOrn Invested in a block of stock in the Mayflower Mining & Milling Co. Will in time give the owner An Income For Life Only once in a lifetime is the chance given to make an investment like this. Be sure that you look carefully into it, for the possibilities arc that the stock of this company will earn . Ten Per Cent. Dividends Per Day The mine. of the company is now so far developed that YOU TAKE NO RISK WHATEVER in buying a block of stock in it. Cpf\ PROMINENT BUSINESS MEN _e\f\ jA\w\Js OF SEATTLE sj£r\J ——ARE SUBSCRIBERS TO $20,000 of Stock in Blocks of $1000 Each. We would be pleased to mail yon their names on request. Three well-known mining experts certify to its being 1 J -1 OX./ O A Remarkable Property. ! ! Cut out this coupon, fill it out and mail at once to address given. COUPON On receipt of this coupon we will mail you "The Story of . „*. The .Mayflower, " a story every one ought to read. Address CHAS. E. CRANE, Treasurer, MM&\ltiOwlifGr MlnUtO Mayflower Mining...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 September 1904

14 LIVE STOCK Feeding Value of Millet Seed. Those ranchers who happen to. have on hand some millet seed that may have lost its reproduction quality for any reason can use it for feeding to livestock. The feeding value of mil let seed is not definitely established, but that it is good under certain con ditions cannot be denied. Millet seed is at present being fed quite exten sively in some of the middle west states. Last winter some of the lots of steers and hogs that were fed on millet topped the Minneapolis market. Millet may be fed to all kinds of stock, but is especially valuable as a fat producing food. The usual method is to grind it and feed it in combina tion with ground wheat or other grains. Prof. J. A. Shepherd, of the North Dakota agricultural college, says millet seed has been used to a considerable extent in his state as a grain for fattening pigs, for which purpose it has been quite successful. Prof. Henry, of the Wisconsin sta tion, made a trial of feeding ground mill...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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