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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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O FOR A CHIEF. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

O FOR A CHIEF. C.M’S. O for a chief to lead us out Iu uiarshelled held the foe to rout! We tire of prate And dull debate, 0 for a chief to laid us out! 1 know full many a hearty boy, That at his call would leap for joy, Who hate your bable Aud brawling rable, Full many a brave and hearty boy. In every county through the land, Teu thousand soldiers idle stand, Who well might yield, In battle field, Their bootless lives, a weary band. I'll cast aside all slavish grief, * To follow thee, my chosen chief, With blade in hand, Wait thy command, And in the labour rind relief. Ten thousand hearts both staunch and true Are waiting thy behests to do, Give but the call And one and all, We hasten to the field with .you. Whether thou be 6f Celtic line, Or Norman glory round thee shine, Right heartily We follow thee, Lead on Fitzgerald, or O’Brien! Waterford Chronicle. Congregationalism in Ohio. A favorite theme just now is the republicanism of Congregationalism. We have in this state now, thank ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FROM THE ARMY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

FROM THE ARMY. On the night of the 19th, an express arrived from Gen. Taylor, stating that he had crossed the Rio Grande and taken the city of Matamoras without opposition, the Mexicans having fled the city. Two regiments, with the exception of about 350, having marched a few days previous, were stationed at Brazos Point awaiting the orders of Gen. Taylor, as it was thought they would leave on the 20th for Matamoras via the old Barita road. Others who were wounded in the action of the Bth and 9th, are at Point Isabel and were recovering. Capt. Auld thinks the whole number of our killed and wounded must amount to more than 300; besides the wounded taken to St. Joseph’s, there are now 40 at Point Isabel too badly wounded to be removed. All but three, it is thought, will recover. There are three Mexican prisoners having but one leg between them all. 1 he condition of the brave and esteemed Captain Page is melancholy indeed. The whole of his lower jaw, with part of his tongue and palate...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Items. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

Items. Priests for the Army. The Rev. Messrs. McElroy and Rey arrived in Pittsburg 4th instant, and remain with Bishop O’Conner until the boat leaves to-day, which is to carry them to New Orleans. They will accompany the march of our army in Mexico. Father McElroy is a man very much advanced in years, but is still active to do his master’s bidding. Cause of Desertion. A private letter from a young man in the U. S. army, opposite Matamoras, says: ‘The cause of so many soldiers deserting, was bad treatment by some of the inferior officers.’ India Rubber Bridge for the Army. Messrs. M. Rider & Brothers, of the Harlem Rubber Factory, have secured an order for the materials for a portable bridge for the army. The “prontoons” are to be made of rubber, and when completed no delay will be experienced in crossing rivers, in a rapid manner. A corps of volunteers for Mexico, composed of printers, and numbering upwards of sixty smart fellows, has been fully organised in Philadelphia...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

AHSQUATULATION. St. Nicholas T.A. Society, East Boston. A man named Barney, oi Bernard Fitzpatrick a menilier of the St. Nicholas Total Abstinence Society,having Been entrusted with $ 12,50 by the said Society, to purchase badges &c. for St. Patricks day, has absconded with the money. He is. besides a defaulter in many other quarters. As he is a person disosd to push himself into membership, and agency with public bodies it is thought expedient to caution Temperance and other Societies against his arts. He is a native of Cos. Fermanagh, Ireland, 35 or 39 years old, stout made, stands about 5 feet 7 inches, brown hair, blue eyes, and florid co nplexion His person is remarkable from the right arm being stiff and shorter than the left. His whiskers are grey; but as he has proved himself so good a shaver, he might remove them. ftj-Rcpeal Wardens elected at the last meeting of the Association:— .Ward 1.--John Nugent, Chairman, Bernard M’Cary, \Villiaiii l«i]l, Nicholas Ket la...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
NEW YORK, [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

NEW YORK, J. O’D. May 26, 1846. •My Dear Sir, —This letter can inform you, that tho’ long silent, I have not j transferred my allegiance from the Pilot, I but nothing of sufficient importance arising to call forth that tremendous weapon—the pen, till our city was aroused at the sound of “ War,” and the leather lungs of long and short-winged orators were called into action, and covered the park with a dense mass of moving matter, —however deeply war is to be deprecated, and the cause lamented, still, when it comes, whether right or wrong, we must face it, for the man that turns his back on the foe is already defeated—the deepest evil has some shade of good, and He in whose hands hangs the destiny of Worlds, can bring forth good from evil, and light from darkness, so in the present instance, and under the peculiar circumstances of the Mexican war, good may arise, it may cement the broken fragmentsof society severed by political quacks, and blind funatics, for there is in the human spe...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AIR—“Paddy Whack." [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

AIR—“Paddy Whack." J. O’D. For the Pilot. The “cloud in the west” seems surcharged still with thunder, Whose light’ning shall flash the wide world around. And slavery’s bonds at its bursting shall sunder, While Tyrants shall tremble and pale at the sound; Land of sorrow and song, from whose bosom 1 roam, Shall the star of thy hope catch its light from the flame, Then for freedom or death let each arm strike home Or blotted be ever your title to fame. O'er many a fleld did your tyrants to glory Ascend but to trample the valor that raised; Earh page of the world is bright with thy story, While darkness o’ershadows the land whence it blazed; Like some black spot of earth whose eruptions arise From discord internal and bursting in flame; Still mounting aloft to its own native skies, Proves its birthplace must still be the cradle of fame. Then a flg for your treaties offlfly-foitr forty, The soil ofColumbia her sons must enjoy; Tho’ Oregon’s plains to the Rio del Norte As deeply were cri...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE CAPUCHIN’S DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

THE CAPUCHIN’S DEATH. BY PARK BENJAMIN. CINCINNATI CHROICLE. There is, in Professor Longfellow’s ‘‘Outre Mer” an affecting incident, beautiiully told, of the death of a young Irishman, who had come to Italy to study at the Jesuit College in Rome, and had taken the orders of a Capuchin Friar. While dying, he knew of his situation, but would not give up the hope of reaching his own home before his disease. “He spone of his return to his native land with childish delight. This hope had nut deserted him. It seemed never to have entered his mind that even this consolation would be denied him—that death would thwart even these fond anticipations. ‘I shall soon be well enough,’ said he.” Shall soon he well enough, “said he,” ‘ Oh, I shall soon be well! I shall not die Beneath the glories of this melting sky— These soft deep hues that bathe the classic land Of Italy,—These gales that are so bland, So haliny and so cool, upon my grave. Shall not, at Vesper’s chiming, rest and wave! Tell me n...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FATHER MARQUETTE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

FATHER MARQUETTE. Will the People of the West build his Monument ? Pno circumstance we have ever read of, has impressed upon our minds so favorably with the Kentuckians, as the recent removal of the remains of Daniel Boon and wife to Lexington for interment. The funeral honors ; the impressive ceremonies of the grave ; and the vast concourse assembled to do honor to the departed, were a tribute front noble men. It is one of the best traits the human character can display to testify publicly to the services of the illustrious dead. It touches a chord in the human breast that thrills our nerves and rouse all the better sympathies of our nature. Yet while we laud the chivalrous Kentuckians for this act of true greatness, we must not forget that there are others equally deserving of remembrance; that the reputation of Boon belongs to the State only, and as such is entitled to its highest respect. But there is another name, a foreigner, which we fear is too much forgotten. It is that of ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

PERSONAL REFERENCES GIVEN. No Charge until the Hair is Restored, are the original terms on which BEALS'S HAIR RESTORATIVE is applied and supplied at the Proprietor’s Olliee, No. lj£ first Avenue, New York. O” Emanating from a regular practising Physician, offered to the public on the above original terms, and personal reference given to our first citizens, "Beals’s Hair Restorative” stands alone, free from aught appertaining to Quackery or humbug. BEALS Si CO. Sold wholesale and retail by the New England Agent, A. S. JORDAN, Comb and Fancy Goods Store, No. 2 Milk street, Boston. in >"33 riNHE CONFESSIONS OF ST. AUGUSA TIN. Price M) cents. Just published and for sale, a complete edition of the Confessions of St. Augustin, Bishop of Hippo, and Doctor of the Church—in ten Books —translated from the Latin, by a Catholic Clergyman. It is unnecessary to recommend this work to the Catholic community; the name of the author is a sutiicieut guarantee of its usefulness. The work wi...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for §l. INFORMATION WANTED, Ol MAIIY DAEY’, (who married John Long), a native ol parish ol Fermoy, co. Cork. She issupposed to be either in New J iliven, Ct, or Boston. Any information respectins her will be thankfully received by her sister, Margaret. Direct to ,Margaret Daly, care ol Mr. Lemuel Cobb, East Sharon, Ms. jel3—4t IT Of THOMAS ROONEY’, journeyman baker, a native of Ireland, who worked in St. Louis two years ago, and worked also about a year and half in Pittsburgh before he went to Si. Louis. lie is supposed to be about New Orleans, or in that direction. Should any kind-hearted indijeb 4t IT Ol PETER SHERIDAN, a native of county Meath, who left his wile and three children in Hamburg, South Carolina, Nov. loth, 1845. Since that time he lias not written or made known his whereabouts, hut information has been received through others that he was at work at Blue root District, in the town of Coosahachet, State ol South Carolina, in Sep...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Foreign. CATHOLIC INSTITUTE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

Foreign. CATHOLIC INSTITUTE. Mr. O’Connell was present at the annual meeting of the Catholic Institute of Greut Britain. We subjoin the speech of the Hon. Gentleman on the occasion:— Mr. O’Connell —l have to propose a rather long resolution, which I shall preface with a short speech (cheers.) —Here there was a brief dialogue between the Secretary and the Chairman of the Committee as to the order of the resolutions.— “I’ll do any thing you like,” said Mr. O’Connell, and proceeded. He then read the resolution, and said—There, that is the resolution 1 have to propose. Now 'or the short speech I promised to make loud cheers and laughter)—l am excestvely anxious that the excellent appeal of iy friend, Mr. Langdale, should have its i ( l effect on the hearts of all here who cun fet for the unfortunate subjects of the definition he described; and I hope, too, tbajtwill have its effect beyond this room, tbatit may be published and brought hom to every Catholic. I am very unxious iat it shou...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

IRELAND. The Calcutta Relief Fund. The following is the distribution of the Calcutta relief fund, as far as the same has yet been collected:— Galway £4OO Kings £3OO Clare * 700 Cork 300 Tipperary 500 Limerick 250 Waterford 100 Mayo, Kilkenny, Armagh, Longford, from £SO to £IOO each. We have great pleasure in recording a fact very much to the credit of the Bankol Ireland, that that establishment made no charge whatever, either of commission or discount, in respect to the bill of exchange for £BOOO, remitted from Calcutta to the credit of the trustees, though the bill was drawn at six months’ date. Grateful Offering. Major Edward Fitzgerald Day, Bengal Artillery, mercifully saved during the late campaign in India, sent home 5/. to the poor of Kerry, as a thanks offering for his preservation. Early Potatoes. Thomas Studdert, Esq, of Bunratty, has an acre of new potatoes which will be fit to dig on the Ist of June. A sample was sent to table on Saturday, fully equal in size to last Year...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE MEXICANS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

THE MEXICANS. They are not all a bad people. They have generous qualities, which we can appreciate and should admire. See what our ex-minister, Mr. Thompson, says of them, in his lately published volume:— “On the 16th of June, 1842, the Texan prisoners of the Santa Fe expedition were released by General Santa Anna, that being his birth-day, or rather the anniversary of his saint (Saint Antonio), which is the day kept by all Mexicans instead of their own birth-day. I knew that they were to be released on that day, on the parade ground near the city, and fearing that the immense populace which would be assembled, might ofter them some violence, 1 went out, knowing that my official station would protect me, and might enable me to protect them. Never was fear more groundless, or a surprise more agreeable. Santa Anna reviewed on that occasion a body of more than ten thousand troops, and there were not less than thirty or forty thousand other persons assembled in the field. When the order...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

THE WAR. A great deal of questioning is going on in the newspapers with respect to the justice of the present war. Some do not scruple to oppose it with all their might, and dissuade the citizens of the Union from supporting it. Their objections rest upon the grounds of the war: they say it has been provoked by injustice on the part of our government and congress, ami that its purpose is the extension of slavery. There is a party also which objects to everything done by the nation as a political power, on the ground that the Constitution of the United States is anti-christian. All these dissatisfactions come to one thing in the end; namely, that the citizens of a free state are at liberty to support as much as they like of the acts and laws of the country, and shirk from its defence, aqd sympathise with its enemies whenever they please. This is the doctrine of the new generation in the land of freedom—Young Democracy and YoungWhiggery, who respect no authority but humbug, and follow...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DISHONESTY OF THE ANTI-CATHOLIC PARTY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

DISHONESTY OF THE ANTI-CATHOLIC PARTY. Truth and honor are just as necessary to parties as to individuals, and as indispensable in public as in private. If a number of men come before the public to recommend some principle which they consider essential to the happiness of the nation, &.c., it is incumbent on them to promote it by fair means, und no other; it is also necessary that they should preserve such a tone and such a course as may show them to be above deceit and trickery, and incapable of making any public principle a cloak and a stepping-stone to serve mean, selfish ends and imposture. In making this remark, we mean that it should apply to that party which rails against the Pope, and the Church of Pome. We tell those gentlemen that when they attempt to move public opinion in this country, they must adopt the same rules, and submit to the same restraints of morality and prudence as in other civilized countries. Let us suppose for a moment that Popery is false and...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THOUGHTS [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

THOUGHTS W. Suggested by a statement of Sir James Graham, in which he manifested much sympathy for the people of Ireland, by saying “ they have a right to beg.” Yes ! yes ! John Bull, all human sense Ajrees this large inheritance. You will preserve ; nor flinch a peg, So dear you hold their right to beg. For years you thought it not a crime, And now on glory’s path sublime, You can’t forget your favorite dreg Of liberty: their right to beg. In rags, in wretchedness, and chains, \ ou minister’d to all their pains, Potatoes! and the whiskey keg, Besides this sacred right to beg! In every stage of weal and wo Contending with the martial foe, They gave their lives—at least a leg: They got your meed, the right to beg. You will have plundered and coerc’d A loving sister from the fust; One as faithful as a teg, She must reward this right to beg. She’ll bide her time ’till every hand Is steeled to strike for fatherland; Then flee like Tam O’Shanter’s meg, Nor wait to ask a right to beg. Sal...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PRESENTATION OF A SPLENDID SILVER PITCHER AND TWO SILVER GOBLETS TO THE REV. MR. LYNCH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

PRESENTATION OF A SPLENDID SILVER PITCHER AND TWO SILVER GOBLETS TO THE REV. MR. LYNCH. The children of St. Patrick’s Church presented to the Rev. Mr. Lynch, on his return from his native land, a beautiful silver pitcher, on one side of which is the Harp and Shamrock (surmounted by the Cross), and on the other the following inscription : “ Presented to the Rev. Thomas Lynch, on his return from his native land, by the boys of tst. Patrick's Sunday School, ns a token of their esteem and affection towards him, their beloved Pastor. Boston, May 1,184 ti.” The female children presented the Goblets, on which were inscribed:— “ Presented to the Rev. Mr. Lynch, by the female teachers and pupils of St. Patrick’s Sunday School, as a token of esteem and affection towards their beloved Pastor. Boston, May 1, 1840.” The following address accompanied thf chaste and beautiful presents:— Rev. and respected Sir,—We, the Children, br> male and female, of St. Patrick’s Sunday School, hie as...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MORE PROOF OF. INTOJERANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 13 June 1846

MORE PROOF OF. INTOJERANCE. We call the attention of *ur readers to the following extract of a letter from a Catholic officer in the American Army, under Gen. Taylor. It is addressed to the editor of the Catholic Advocate of Louisville, to which paper we are indebted for it. In addition to its being an interesting detail of the movement of the army up to its date—it contains facts in relation to a topic of a religious nature, which has of late been much discussed in the papers: , Point Isabel, May bth, 1846. Dear Sir — l am proud to confirm your statement of the number of Catholics who flock to our standard of Liberty, but 1 must beg you to contradict the tale of their being compelled to attend at the lecture of a Presbyterian clergyman in a house, used as a theatre during the week, and a meeting house on Sunday. They were Hot compelled to attend at that lecture; but at nearly every other post in the whole army they are compelled to march to church and back again, w hether the preac...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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