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Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 FOR SALE—registered Purebred Gebvieh buls. Black, red, polled. Performance records. Good EPD's. Call 703-783-6100, after 7:00 pm. FOR SALE—registered Poled Hereford buls. 12 months old. Crewe, VA. 645-9193. SALE—POLLED HEREFORD BULLS, Hfs, cow/calfs. Sat. Oct. 19—1:00 pm. Fairgrounds. Dublin, VA. 639-1860. HEREFORD BULL 4 years old $1200.2 Hereford cows with calfs $1000 each. All excellent stock. 804-927-5110. CHAROLAIS, 7 cow/calf prs. 3 bred heifers, 2 bred cows. 703-628-5703, Abingdon. SHORTHORN CALF SALE—Saturday, Nov. 2. Expoland FishervHle, VA. For catalog call 703-997-9468. BEEFMASTER, fertility tested registered BBU beef master service age bulls. Vivian Evans. 703-682-4457. SIMMENTAL BULLS, COWS & HEIFERS available. Cal Tom Clark, Wytheville. 703-228-4407. REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE—aII ages available. Call 804-299-5100, Elk Creek Angus Farm. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN BULLS. Service age and weaned bull calves. Also 4-H club calves. Telephone 703-825-...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

Vol. 50, No. 9 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS November 1991 When It Comes To Long Term Savings a CD Can't Hold a Candle To The Deferred Annuity Current Interest Rate' 7.75% 6.5% 91 H Interest Earnings Tax-Deferred Currently Taxable *5^ Surrender Charges Limited To 8 Years" Yes No ■ Partial Free Withdrawals" Yes No Iff!) H Safety Reserves Established p RIC |fife H ■ by Insurance company IB 30 Year After-Tax Accumulation"' $332,868 $197,188 ■■§ H 30 Year After-Tax Monthly Income"* $3,028 $1,629 jw|: The above chart is for comparative purposes only. Call yotlr county Farm Bureau office for your personal FLEX II Profile! Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance "flex a current rate is not guaranteed subject to change periodically Once the tm„_. ti _ r.i ui annuity is established, current rale is guaranteed for one year The guaranteed Company Oilers Flex 11, a Flexible Premium rate is 4% for the life of the policy CDs offer no long term guarantees beyond CD Retirement Annuity ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

Farm Bureau Vol. 50, No. 10 fe- vfl ll JPH ~ il^C^rll J& %■> ; \ * yr» ' S- i I U.S. Rep. Herbert H. Bateman and his wife were among guests at the Dec. 4 banquet at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 66th Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. 40-year employee receives Distinguished Service award By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Edrtor The Farm Bureau Federation's 1991 Distinguished Service Award goes to a woman who was hired in 1950 before the state organization's first office even had opened. During her 40 years of service, she assisted six presidents, five insurance managers and four corporate secretaries, and since 1987, served herself as corporate secretary She was awarded during the VFBF's Annual Convention Dec. 4 in Richmond. "Evelyn John retired in the spring of 1990 as corporate secretary but continues to be a beloved member of the Farm Bureau family and supportive of that family," noted President C. Wayne Ashworth. When she began as se...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

2 1992 General Assembly challenges farming, rural ife Virginia is rapidly becoming an urban state, especially in the so-called Golden Crescent from Northern Virginia through Richmond and into Hampton Roads. Two-thirds of the population reside in these three metropolitan areas. Accompanying that growing urban population are more urban legislators less familiar and perhaps less understanding of rural Virginia's needs. Making matters more challenging is the fact that both agricultural committee leaders in the General Assembly left with the last session and won't be returning in 1992. Sen. Howard Anderson, D-Halifax, chairman of the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee, retired this year. Meanwhile, Del. Glenn B. McClanan, D-Viiginia Beach, chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, was defeated at the polls Nov. 5. The 1992 General Assembly will pose a true challenge to our organization and to agriculture. VCt must educate our lawmakers moreso than in the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 Legislative priorities formed by grassroots process (Continued from Page 2) rollback requirement, and oppose allow- ing the rollback to be increased to 10 years This would essentially defeat the purpose of the program. It would place an undue tax burden on farmers. Private property rights Farmers are facing a steady erosion of private property rights as governmental regulations rapidly increase. Therefore, Farm Bureau requests that Virginia's Administrative Process Act be amended to require state agencies to report the economic impact of future regulations on property values. In some cases these regulations prohibit the productive use of land and, in many cases, significantly devalue the property. This affects a farmer's long-term economic stability as well as the ability to borrow operating money Stricter penalties for trespassing Extremist animal rights groups across the nation have destroyed property, vandalized farms and laboratories, removed animals,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

4 What Covers 40,767 Square Miles, Protects Millions Of People, And Measures 2x3 Inches? It's one of life's wonders. It stretches from the Eastern Shore to beyond the doesn't mean you can't be prepared for them. And even though it's paper-thin, when Blue Ridge Mountains. Yet it fits in your wallet. you have it with you, there's no greater peace of mind. It's something that people in all walks of life depend on every day. The farm It's the most widely accepted card of its kind, the one nearly two million Virfamily in Nelson County. The computer analyst in Richmond. The great grandmother ginians carry with them wherever they go. In fact, you're probably carrying it right in Roanoke. The baby boy who's just minutes from being born in Fredericksburg. now. And if you're not, isn't it time your family had this kind of pro- Blue Cross It was created based on a simple idea: Just because life is full of surprises tection? It's the card from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia. Blue Shield...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 Christmas trees and greenery have many uses afterwards A h , the Christmas tree, the wreaths, the boughs! What wonderful holiday symbols which fill our homes with scent and sight. But once the holidays have past, it's time to find other ways to use the decorations. Never thought of doing anything other than discarding the tree and trimmings with the trash? Think again. If all households throw away their bulky, evergreen holiday decorations, think how quickly we will fill up our landfills. Due to new state laws and our growing population, landfill sites are becoming harder to locate and more expensive to develop and maintain. Virginians can help their communities by finding ways to keep their Christmas trees and other recyclables out of garbage bins. Cut trees and evergreen branches have so many uses in the landscape you'll be surprised you never re-used them before. Bird watchers can create a feeding station for birds and other backyard wildlife from the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

6 Farm Bureau groups put on farm extrication training By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director Living in an area of intensive farming practices led the Augusta County Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Women's Committees, along with several other sponsors, to conduct a two-day training exercise in farm safety Oct. 19-20. The program was designed to teach quick, safe victim removal, or extrication, from farm equipment while concentrating on minimum damage to farm machinery. Extrication is a critical part of any farm rescue. Despite a farmer's suffering, he still may not ax>perate with rescue teams because he does not want his expensive farm machinery further damaged, noted the trainer. Insurance will not cover excessive or unnecessary damage to machinery because of rescue operations. Other demonstrations and workshops focused on equipment identification, knowledge of farming operations and processes, hazard awareness, silo construction and safety procedures. Sunday's demonstr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 Wythe County youth is Farm Bureau queen Sherry Lynelle Shuler, daughter of Coleman and Donna Shuler of Wythe County, was crowned Miss Virginia Farm Bureau 1992 during Family Night, Dec. 2, at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Convention at Richmond. The 20-year-old Virginia Tech sophomore still remembers the pride and responsibility she felt when she held her first lamb at age 4. "But a 4-year-old just doesn't understand that our nation's economy rests largely on agriculture, and probably couldn't understand technological advances such as hybridization, no-till planting and genetic engineering," said the new queen in her acceptance speech. "No, these are not the reasons that I began to love farm life, and these are not the reasons that I want to always be a part of agriculture. You see, I learned early in life that if 1 never go back to the farm, it will always be important," said Miss Shuler. She recalled learning about teamwork while driving sheep to ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

8 Washington County couple named Young Farmers of the Year Increasing the milking speed of their dairy herd, improving crop production, and implementing new environmental measures helped earn Steve and Andrea Wolfe the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1991 Young Farmers of the Year award. The Wolfes run a 690-acre diversified dairy, corn silage, ear corn, hay and tobacco operation near Meadowview in Washington County They were awarded at a special breakfast Dec. 3 during the VFBF's Annual Convention in Richmond. For the second consecutive year, an honorable mention was made to Rockingham County Young Farmers Keith and Jennifer Sheets, who have a poultry and crop operation at McGaheysvilie. The annual year-long competition weighs a farmer's or farm couple's overall success and progress in farming and management ability, while offering leadership opportunities. To increase milking speed, the Wolfes remodeled the farm's milking parlor and increased capacity from 32 head to 60 head. Th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 -A Tradition of Vision 1 1 «Hfl| BBur ™ ™ is congratulated by President C. tlen Neese. i cholestero a A \ Y node! of five pounds illness Inc. prepare F's hfrnda. g Farmers President Ashworth awards Raymond and Maryellen Holden of Augusta County the Outstanding Young Farmer Chairmen award. Augusta Young Farmers awarded for activities Ray and Maryellen Holden of Augusta County were recognized as Virginia Farm Bureau Federations' outstanding Young Farmer Chairmen Dec. 3 during the VFBF's annual convention at Richmond. Under the Holdens' leadership, the Augusta County Young Farmers completed all 18 activities prescribed for Young Farmer committees for 1991. VFBF presents this award to encourage participation by young farmers in their county Farm Bureaus. Competing for points, county Young Farmer committees conduct activities that address local needs. These activities include educational meetings, meetings with legislators and governing boards, helping to deve...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

10 Mrs. John honored (Continued from Page 1) packed up files again for the move to an old building on West Grace Street where today's parking deck stands. She's seen Farm Bureau outgrow the building built here in 1964. And she was among special guests at the groundbreaking this fall of VFBF's future home at West Creek business park in Goochland County. Louis P. Chisholm, former VFBF administrative secretary, wrote in his letter nominating Mrs. John for the distinguished service award: "She was always calm, cool and never flustered. She was always supportive of her superiors, could be trusted to keep certain matters confidential, and was dependable on all occasions. At the same time, she assisted her fellow workers at every call and was always willing to lend a hand... "She did much to establish the reputation and character of our organization. Her wealth of knowledge of Farm Bureau and its leaders comes from her love of what we stand for. In fact, she's already been honored once by ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 Poultry litter as cow feed: just what is involved? By Eric McMulNn Special to Farm Bureau News Broiler litter is an economical source of protein and energy when used as a cattle feed. Extension nutritionists estimate it would cost at least $85 a ton in grain and meal to equal the nutrients found in broiler litter, which they say is high in protein, minerals and fiber, and has the energy equivalent of grass hay. That's not news to Southeastern cattlemen, some of whom have been feeding broiler litter to brood cows and stockers for nearly 35 years. "Broiler litter can be fed at a wide range of levels, from use as a protein source to balance a ration to use as a major part of a cattle diet," says John Gerken, Extension animal scientist at Virginia Tech. Interest in the practice is picking up because of two factors: the increasingly tight profit margins in feeding cattle, and the environmental problems of too much poultry manure. Alabama, for example, accumula...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

12 .- *" ' *X" * fc^ ' '*'' Horse and rider circle back around for their next jump. 1111 1 MMHMMtf 11 - ■ " « Up... and over. Horse and rider ctear a hurtfle in the outdoor arena. Give healthful holiday gifts with creative touch NewWellness for Farm Bureau the holiday season, they often lead to another holiday tradition —a New Year's resolution to lose 10 pounds. You may consider offering a new kind of gift basket this year, one that's a bit more health-minded, but every bit as delicious. Bring one of the sweetest scents of the season to everyone on your list by making your own gift sacks of mulling spices to simmer in pots of cider, wine or fruit juice. Wrap allspice cinnamon sticks, cardamom pods, mace and whole cloves in cheese cloth, then cover with colored cellophane and tie with ribbons and whole cinnamon sticks. Attach the bag to a jug of cider, wine or fruit juice along with instructions for simmering the contents in a gallon container with slices of fresh oranges and lemons...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 The meat of the '90s Ostrich isn't just hiding its head in sand today By ANTHONY HANKINS Extension Specialist Alternative Agriculture The ostrich is the largest of living birds. The ostrich is the only bird with two toes, one large and one small. The emu, rhea and cassowary which share the classification of ratites have three toes. Adult male ostriches may exceed eight feet in height and weigh as much as 350 to 400 pounds. The ostrich is a flightless bird, although the wings are well developed and used during courtship and aggressive display. While it cannot fly, it is nevertheless known for its speed and agility. This huge, leggy bird can reach and maintain speeds of up to 40 miles per hour for a duration of 30 minutes without any notable exhaustion. They are native to the open, arid regions of Africa and Saudi Arabia. South African farmers first began domestic propagation of ostriches for commercial purposes in the 1860s to meet the worldwide demand for...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

14 Wetlands reform push continues PARK RIDGE, 111 —The rights of landowners continue to be trampled under current federal wetlands regulations, according to Dean Kleckner, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation. Kleckner said under current wetlands restrictions, farmers are told they can't use the land as they want to, sell it or develop it. But they're still required to pay taxes and the mortgage on these so-called wetlands. Recent news reports said members of federal agencies involved in regulating wetlands have universally chastised a Bush administration proposal to reform the current regulations. Sources call the reform proposal "scientifically unsound'' and "unworkable." But the Farm Bureau leader said that 's why farmers want Congress to settle the wetlands dispute, not just have the wetlands delineation manual changed. "Put it in law, define it (a wetland) properly, and then pay " just compensation for taking away the use of the property, Kleckner said. "The Fifth A...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

December 1991/ January 1992 REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN BULLS. Service age and weaned buD calves. Also 4-H club calves. 703-825-0590. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS. 10—rent or sell. Graperidge Farms, Box 115, Goochland, VA. 23063. HOUNSHELL'S BLACK SIMMENTAL'S for sale. Black Polled Simmentals, Bulls, Heifers, Purebreds and percentage cows. 703-686-4055. FOR SALE—Registered Jersey's, cows, calves, heifers. 804-293-9012. HEREFORD BULL for sale. 5 years old, $1200. Call Tad Thompson, Tuckahoe Farmers, Richmond, VA. 804-784-5736. WANTED—down, slow and crippled cattle. Rick Lewis. 804-352-5846 or 804-352-7352. FOR SALE—registered walking & racking weanling colts. Excellent show or pleasure prospects. 703-789-4613. REGISTERED MORGANS. 1991 Bay colts. Friendly dispositions. Easy to handle. Call evenings. Hayslett Morgans. 1-703-962-3465. TENNESSEE WALKING HORSES. Registered and grade, Geldings and Mares. Good trail horses. Phone 703-382-0460. RASTURE AND STALL BOARD available at Belm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1991

— /to* * Vol. 50, No. 10 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODfiCERS . APecember 1991/ January 1992 L y — J "Value. Their rates are competitive and help me get great value for my money. My agent helps me plan for the future with a wide range of products. Annuities, IRA's, Mortgage Cancellation, Disability Income, Whole Life ... you name iL No wonder | »|IJ J M Americans from every walk of life depend on Farm Bureau Insurance.?'. VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY I joining Vm Ic southern farm bureau life insurance company neipins 70U IS > SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY What We Do Best. 200 w. GRACE ST, RICHMOND, va 23261 804-788-1234 j; m I m j| B * s ~«» ""«. Jf H «f. $*&* {-*# f|* * JM ''%' -■ ~ V -■ -a w m f?! k gffil'Mßi^^^^B^' 1 * .- "•-*•. ' ygFii Mfl sH *1 ISS jk : I « Memories shared, future envisioned Distinguished Service Award recipient Evelyn John shares a memory of the old days of Far...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1992

Farm Bureau Vol. 51, No. 1 Bush pledges support for farmers KANSAS CITY, Mo.—President Bush affirmed his support for free trade as long as it is fair trade Jan. 13 in remarks to 5,000 farmers and ranchers at the American Farm Bureau Federation's 73rd annual meeting. The president said he would not unilaterally disarm the U.S. export enhancement program, which counters subsidies 10 times as large from the European Community. "Open markets are the key to our economic future, both for American agriculture and business. That fight is going to take a long time," said Bush. He also addressed the need to cut capital gains taxes and stressed his commitment to finally add common sense to the nation's wetlands policy. "We won the Cold War, and we will win the competitive wars. We will do it on the merits, and we're going to do it the American way—through grit, through determination and through quality," said Bush. Just back from his trade mission to Asia and Australia, Bush said, "I oppose ma...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1992

2 Farm Bureau's attention on budget cuts in agriculture You may recall that I discussed our upcoming legislative agenda for the 1992 General Assembly in my last column. Through the first month of the session, we are already making inroads that we hope will turn a majority of those wants and needs into realities. But on Jan. 8, our agenda grew significantly. That was the date Gov. L. Douglas Wilder unveiled his two-year budget plan for Virginia. Ending his state of the commonwealth address with his announcement to pull out of the presidential race, Wilder took some attention off the bleak budget picture—but only momentarily. With the state hampered by a sluggish economy, Wilder's $28 billion budget plan for the 1992-94 biennium contained agriculture and forestry cuts of roughly $14 million. Thus, our legislative agenda quickly expanded by about that same amount. Not only will we continue to work on our original list of priorities, but we've already begun reacting to this added set of...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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