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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HOW MANY EGGS? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

HOW MANY EGGS? We have been frequently asked how many eggs ought any given number of hens to average in the course of a year? We would say, in reply, that with good care, they ought to average from 120 to 160 each, and increase three-fold each year, doubling the number of layers, and furnishing an equal number of roosters for the market. The pullets of any given year ought to average fully live months of laying time, during which they ought to lay thirty eggs each. Each hen will eat about one bushel of ■wheat, or its equivalent, during the year, and the progeny of the year will consume for each one, say half as much more. From these data, and taking the average price of eggs at 35 cents per dozen, and wheat at $1.50 per bushel, we may reasonably make the following calculation with regard to the Annual Profit on 100 Hens In the vicinity of San Francisco: 100 hens, s»y 130 eggß each.., $371 OS 100 pullets, say 25 egg* each 72 80 100 pullets (good breed) , cash value 100 00 100 rooster...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PACKING EGGS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

PACKING EGGS. A correspondent of the Country Gentleman says:—" At Cardington, ninety-six miles south of Cleveland, and a place of ttbout 1,000 inhabitants, more eggs are probably packed for the New York market than any other one town in the West. I visited one cellar where they had 33,000 dozen eggs in pickle, and another establishment in the village had 38,000 dozen in pickle. About 1,500 barrels were shipped in November from that town to New York. One of the egg men there, a man by the name of Marvin, packs eggs in barrels in September and October, using cut straw in the packing, and keeps them till the holidays before shipping to New York. He " candles" the eggs carefully before packing, and heads up the barrels, and turns them the other end up every day. The eggs bought during the months of June, July, and August, are put in vats made of bricks, laid up in water-lime in the ceilar; the vats when full being covered with muslin sheets, over which is spread a paste of lime, like th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Tubular Lantern. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

The Tubular Lantern. A most excellent lantern, and one most highly to be recommended, Would be that O&e which, while being convenient to handle, will give a pure, powerful light, emit no offensive or hurtful gas, will not smoke the globe, cannot be made to heat,take fire, or explode, can be easily trimmed and lighted,has no delicate or complicated parts to get out of order, burns the cheapest, most readily obtained and most effective oil, and burns it most economically, and is equally good indoors and out, at rest and in motion, in calm and in wind. The manufacturers of the lantern here illustrated claim that thoir device conies the nearest of any made to satisfying the above demands. They use it for kerosene, because this article is cheaper and much more convenient than oil. The objections to kerosene lanterns are that they are liable to heat, often take fire, sometimes explode, and do not perfectly consume the oil, thus not only wasting that material but also smoking a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Tension Wheel for Sewing Machines. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Tension Wheel for Sewing Machines. For the purpose of keeping the thread tightened sufficiently in operating a sewing machine, Mr. John H. Mooney, of this city, has invented a very ingenious con- trivance, patented under date of May, 'Jlst 1870, which is illustrated below. The following shows how it is operated: The thread, passing from the spool through the guide over tho wheel, is placed one and a half times around the wheel, between the two corrugated disks, and from thence is carried to the eye of the needle. The required tension is obtained by turning the thumb nut on tho end of the stud, which presses the spring against the wheel, making it turn more or less easily as may be necessary. The friction on the thread is produced by its bending itself against the half circles made by the teeth or corrugations in the two flanges of the wheel; the teeth on one side being distant from those opposite a greater space than the diameter of the thread, it cannot bind or fasten itself, but w...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PRINCIPLES OF GOOD CULTIVATION. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

PRINCIPLES OF GOOD CULTIVATION. Wo have before us a very interesting lecture recently delivered by Prof. Buckland, at Blandi'ord, England, which is well deserving of a careful study by every agriculturist. The lecture opens with a few practical remarks on the " Origin of Farm Plants," in which the lecturer shows how all the useful plants of tho farm were derived, by experimental processes, from wild plants, that were originally of little use as food for man. He believed that by continuous care all our plants, cereals, roots, etc., might be still further and vastly improved by a judicious selection of seed and careful cultivation. Examine any given seed pod, the seed of any fruit, or any head or ear of cereals, and you will find a great difference in the character of the seed in said pod, fruit, or ear. By a careful selection of only a small portion, and those the choice seed of such pod, etc., and careful after cultivation a most marked improvement will bo observed in the product of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Dairying on the Truckee.—A correspondent of the Sacramento Union says that within a scope ranging, say thirty miles north of Truckee, there was produced not less than 150 tons of butter last year. This brought, on an average of, say 33 cents per pound, aggregating in the main $90,000. * * * It would, perhaps, not be exaggerating to say that no part of the great American continent affords better facilities —naturally—for dairying, than the ranges of the Sierra Nevada mountains, where, in many places, embracing a large area, the most nutritious and milk-producing wild grasses grow in spontaneous abundance — such, for instance, as bunch grass, wild oats, California clover, white sage, and many other kinds best adapted for milk and butter-producing purposes. Hundreds of little valleys are being taken up and converted into dairies, where, from six to seven months in the spring and summer and autumn seasons, the pasture is excellent. A Lawyer Agriculturist,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Man and Woman, Considered in their Relations to each other and the World. By Henry 0. Pedrter. New York, Samuel R. Wells, Publisher, IH7O. Bvo. pp. 116. For sale by A. L. Bancroft & Co., 8. F. This is one of those books which are now coming in numbers before the public, as the question of the social relations are pressing themselves on the attention of the people. Gibbons (we believe) said that civilization appears favorable to all virtues except chastity, a statement that has many plausible grounds, although perhaps not to be taken as a necessary, or even an actual, truth. Mr. Pedder, in this book, seeks to induce a careful survey of human nature as the only correct basis on which to rest our social hypotheses. We give one short extract which seems to us worthy of attention. "As immortal beings, it is disgraceful for us to suppose, as many apparently do, that we ai'e placed in this world merely for the gratification of our appetites and the propagation of the human race...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SHORT PAPERS ON AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

SHORT PAPERS ON AGRICULTURE. ivo. a. [For tho Press, by Dr. J/R. Thomas.] Scientific Farming, of Recent Origin. Agriculture, as a science, is of very recent date. Notwithstanding, whole libraries had been written on the practical side of the subject, during the later periods of the world's history, immediately preceeding the middle ages, yet, during these periods, nothing was produced that we know of, which rises to tho dignity of true science. Indeed, after the dawn of returning civilization, although, there were many examples of voluminous authorship on husbandry and its kindred topics, we find, almost nothing, for two centuries, that is based upon acciirate knowledge of vegetable chemistry, and of the composition of soils in their relations to this field of human industry. What Constitutes Science—lts Relations to Arts. Science is knowledge of Nature's laws; and the application of this knowledge to the practical industries of life constitutes what is called "art-useful" or orname...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SANTA CRUZ FARMER'S CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

SANTA CRUZ FARMER'S CLUB. [Reported for the Phesh by Kookr Oonant.] The olub met at the Court House in Santa Cruz, on Saturday afternoon, March 4th. The proposition to amend article 'M. of the constitution, by striking out the words, "any farmer," and inserting the words "any person" came up for discussion, and created quite an exciting debate. Mr. Locke wished that something could be done that would induce the members to vote for the proposed amendment. If it was lost, he feared that the club would be the loser. In his opinion, any person interested in the subject of agriculture ought to be allowed to become a member. It was admitted, even by those who opposed the amendment, that anyone who owned a piece of ground, however small, and cultivated a few trees, could become a member. If such a person can join, why not admit all and say so in the constitution. The principal objection seemed to be against the lawyers. Some of the best treatises on farming are from the pens of lawyers. A ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemistry and its Applications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Chemistry and its Applications. [Prof. Ezra S. Cabu before the Mechanic Arts ColLBSI, Mechanics' lustitmte Hall, S. F. Reportid expressly tor the Press.] Chlorine—Common Salt. Leot. IV. March 11. —Chlorine was first discovered by a Swedish chemist, in 1774, avlio, however, thought that it was a compound and called it muriatic acid. In 1805), a French chemist found reason to consider it an element, and in 1810, an Englishman, Sir Humphrey Davy, showed conclusively that it was a compound, and named it chlorine, (from the Greek word Chloros, green) from its color. Chlorine is a yellowish greenish gas. It is found quite widely distributed in nattire, but always combined with another substance. It occurs very commonly with sodium as chloride of sodium, or common salt, of which it constitutes 60 per cent. It also occurs quite commonly with magnesium. Chloride of sodium and chloride of magnesium constitute between 2% and 3 per cent, of the sea water. Salt is found almost everywhere in the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Sinoular Color. —A pond between this city and Anaheim has, during the last few weeks, excited the attention of the neighboring inhabitants by gradually changing its color, finally assuming a blood-red tinge. A bottle of the water was brought to this city and subjected to analysis by Dr. Hays. The microscope failed to explain the mystery, but application of chemical tests revealed the presence of minute particles of vegetable matter, and precipitated them so that the reddish hue of the water could be distinguished at a distance. Here is an opening for the research of a naturalist.— Los Angeles News. Oil in Livekmore Valley.— A letter from Livermore to the Alameda Advocate says that there is quite an oil excitement there. A well was sunk 55 feet when a gas commenced to issue which took fire (from a candle) and burned brilliantly. There is a constant roaring going on in the bottom of the well and the water in the well is as blue as indigo, and smells of coal oil and sulphur. The gravel...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vaccination. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Vaccination. [Written /or the Press.] Vaccination (from the Latin vacca a cow,) was discovered and reduced to practice by Dr. 'Jenner, of Gloucester, England, in the year 1798. Previous to that time, it was estimated, that, at least one-tenth of the deaths among the people were caused by small pox. In 1795 it is stated that thirtysix thousand people died of small pox, in England alone, in one year. In consideration of the unspeakable benefits which his discovery conferred upon the people of Great Britain and the world, the English Parliament gave him the handsome sum of about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars in gold. This, however,Avas not his only reward,for history will hand the name of Jenner down through untold generations, for ages to come, as one of the greatest benefactors of mankind. His important discovery has banished, wherever practiced, one of the most fatal diseases to which the human family were subjected; for medical testimony is unanimous in the declaration, th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. The Percheron Horse stands at the entrance of our ranch, and any of our readers who can catch him, are free to use him as they may see fit. They may, if they choose, ride him in search of Premium* for New Fruits, and in passing through our library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, but we advise them in such case to remember that the most profitable course is to hasten slowly. They can pass in review the Recent Inventions, stop a moment to look through our Microscope, go to the Remarkable Spring, take a look at the Route of the Northern Pacific R. R., visit the California Peat beds, the Rocky Mountain Canal, the Salt Beds of Kern County, etc. They can examine our Poultry Depart* ment, test the Tubular Lantern, the Tension Wheel for Sewing Machines, and our Principles of Good Cultivation. Then they can take a hast}' trip through the coast, using our Agricultural Notes as v guide book. Then, certainly, the horse will require a rest. The paper on Ancient Agricultur...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

Oub Meteorological Kei>oht.— We are one week behind in our meteorological record, as furnished by Dr. Logan; but shall bring it up next week. In the mean time we append hereto the Dr.'s "remarks" for the present week, as especially interesting just at this time. Eemabks. —In looking over our raintable for the past twenty-one years, we find the mean-rain of March almost equal to that of January: 3.168 inches. In two years only, (1837 and 18G5,) has the rainfall measured under one inch. The former year was comparatively dry and the latter wet. We have only received thus far for this month O.Ob'O of an inch; so that the probabilities aro strongly in favor of a sufficiency of rain, yet to come, for the maturing of the present very promising crop. This inference is, at the present writing, (March 12th, 2 p. m.) sustained by the fact that the barometer has fallen 204 thousandths of an inch during the last 24 hours, attended also with a sudden decline of temperature. As this is ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
STUDY AND CULTIVATION OF GRASSES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

STUDY AND CULTIVATION OF GRASSES. To common apprehensions few branches of studies appeal loss important to the welfare of mankind than such as are associated with the better and more economical culture of those varieties of the Qrtminm which are exclusively grown (or allcrwed to grow, as in natural pastures) solely for their grazing and forage qualities. To the unlearned reader it will perhaps be necessary to explain our meaning farther, by stating that the tall bamboo, the stately sugar cane and maize (corn) as well as the commonly known cereal grains—wheat, oats, barley, etc., belong to the same family of plants as the remainder, which are solely utilized for the purpose of feeding animals, to which latter class it is our desire to more immediately interest the attention of our agricultural readers. It will doubtless startle many that notwithstanding the more prominent importance which is commonly attached to such products, as the cereal grains, sugar, etc.; yet of the total agric...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOW TO MAKE OUR PUBLIC GROUNDS INSTRUCTIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

HOW TO MAKE OUR PUBLIC GROUNDS INSTRUCTIVE. We possess, in the l'laza and squares of this city, a considerable variety of trees, shrubs and plants, usually of an ornamental character which, to the mass only possess that characteristic; yet which, by a very small outlay of labor and expense, could be made to combine instruction also. The mode by which we propose to accomplish the two objects is by having attached a label with the botanical and vulgar name and the [habitat of at least one specimen of each variety of plant growing in any public enclosure. Such labels would be instructive to the non-botanical and also, in many cases, to the botanical students, and well calculated, to engender a taste for botanical studies among the former. We fortunately possess citizens who combine the requisite artistic and scientific qualifications inquired for such a task, and hope our daily contempoaries will aid our efforts in this connection. We would call the attention of the City Fathers to thi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDING AND TRAVELING SECRETARY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 18 March 1871

CORRESPONDING AND TRAVELING SECRETARY. I. N. Hoag, Associate Editor of the Bubal Press, has been elected by the State Board of Agriculture, as Corresponding and Traveling Secretary of the State Agricultural Society. Mr. Hoag's relation with this paper, will remain unchanged. His new position as Corresponding and Traveling Secretary, will enable him to obtain a greater amount of fresh and reliable information upon all subjects connected with the agricultural interests of the State and coast, and our readers will receive the benefit of these additional facilities through the columns of the Press. The State Agricultural Society has been charged with being too much inclined to encourage horse racing, at the expense of other and more -strictly agricultural interests. The Board, in their last report, promise that they will make an effort to bring up all the material and agricultural interests to a proper standard, at the fair of 1871. —In other words, that they will do their part to rende...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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