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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LATEST FASHION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

LATEST FASHION. For dainty 1'iorks and blouses tin1 old fav ourite, cotton voile, is still very popular. Some of t he newest -limv embroidery similar to tlio older embroidered tnu*lins, Wilier in flouncing, iiiM'itioc, or :iII-ovit designs. Tliero are charm iny when simply insole np. Still smother eliarni in;* fashion of this son-t-n is to trim a Moral voile fiock with bands of tin? same material in a cont tasting colour. Alt effective design for is Miotic is given in our illustration, n crcmc ritual voile ornamented with l»amls of plain l.lue voile. The belt is of black velvet with st learners.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TALES OF BATTLE. CORRESPONDENTS' ANECDOTES, BELGIAN BILL ADAMS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

TALES OF BATTLE. jJ CORRESPONDENTS' ANECDOTES, |j BELGIAN BILL ADAMS. Air. John T. M'Culclicon. u well-known Xr,f. Amcrlcnn eiirlounlst slvcs, In the London , j Daily Chronicle, un extremely Interesting ac count of hl« adventures u» si sightseer on what he calls the 'eilgo of the trouble in ? Huropc. . a, Tujjethjr with two friends, ho hull sue- O cc tiled in gelling about by using various ^ \ (.hlcles, such as taxlcabs and hansoms, and in.ee they bought an ohsoleto cart and horsft In Beaumont, however, where they liiid gone la the hope of seeing a big battle, Iho Germans held them up for a couple ot days, but gave them permission 10 sen inu carl und horse— the lutter seeming to havo grown a little weary of the war. j 'Wo ciillcil ihls matronly grey mare The J r.i.liles,'' imys Mr. M'Cutcheon, 'on account J uf thu prominence of its hip-bones. 'We tried to sell the horse and carl, ho ciitinuoii, 'but no one In tho town would give anything for It whatsoever. They thought Hint If they ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FRIENDS FIGHT DUEL. DRAMATIC MID-AIR EPISODE. AVIATORS LOTH TO KILL. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

FRIENDS FIGHT DUEL. DRAMATIC MID-AIR EPISODE. AVIATORS LOTH TO KILL. There couUl be no more drumatic meeting than that which took place between an Eng lish aud a German aviator, who, friends in time of peace, met as enemies la the clouds and fought a duel. The remarkable inci dent, which was related to a Paris correspon dent by the British airman and his observer, was the ouLcoinc of the hitter's search for a certain German Taube, said to be bound for Paris on a bomb-throwing mission. Tho two ajrmen, who are well known, in London and Xevv Vork, had left the aerodrome on the outskirts of Paris un a big Volsin biplane. and quickly climbed through the fog which overhung the Seino until their barograph sbOwed an altitude of over 1K)U metres. They passed over the Eiffel Tower, the Champs Elysees, the Arc do Triomphc, and tho Bols de Boulogne. The idiot shall now bo al lowed to continue the story for himself. 'My observer,' he said, 'who was using a pair of high-powered field-glasses, sud...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INFERIOR LOVE. GERMANS NOT GOOD HUSBANDS. "CHILDREN, CHURCH, AND COOKERY." [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

INFERIOR LOVE. IJERMANS NOT GOOD HUSBANDS. 'CHILDREN, CHURCH, AND COOKERY.' A German ladv in an artiWo In l'earsoti'r. Weekly declares that Germans make horrid husbands. Sho says: — Although I was hotn In Ithliicland and am Germanic in many of my tastes, my sympa thies In this war tire entirely with tho coun try In which 1 have spent the happiest ycarB of my life. Britain seems quite a paradise to one who 1ms been brought up In a coun try where woman Is considered a being al together Inferior to man. On my arrival hero I had the feeling of be ing elevated to a higher caste: ±«or imi first time In my life I began to wonder If perhaps after all 1 was of some real conse quence In tho world. 'TAKE MV SEAT. PLEASE!' I I remember my delight nnd surprise when, on the second day of my life In England, I happened to enter a erowded omnibus, and was immediately invited by a gentleman to take his seat. It seemed to mo an almost Incomprehensible thing that I should bo treated with such genuine ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARE WE DOWNHEARTED?-NO! [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

I ARE WE DOWNHEARTED? — NO! By bridge and battery, town and trench They're fighting with bulldog pluck; Not one, from Tommy to General French, Is down upon his luck. Thero aro some who stand and somo who fall, But how does the chorus go That echoing chant in tho hearts of all? 'Are wo downhearted?— No!' | There's Jack, God bless him, upon the foam, His Isn't an easy tnsk, I To strike for England, to strike right home, So much, ho more, docs he ask. On the Dreadnought's deck where tho big guns bark, Or in quiet depths below — The salt wind wafts us a chantey. Hark! . 'Aro we downhearted?— No!' And what of the girl who Is left behind, And tho wife who misses her mate? Oh. well, we've got our business to mind, Though it's only to watch and wait, So we'll take what conies with a gallant heart, As wo busily knit and sew, Trying, God help us, to do our part, 'Arc we downhearted?— No!' Jessie Pope, in the London Dally Mall.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POINTS ABOUT POLAND. THE EASTERN BATTLE GROUND. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

POINTS ABOUT POLAND. THE EASTERN BATTLE GROUND. Of the 12,500,000 population of Russian Poland tne scene of tbe great battles In the East., :»hout 1,000,000 are Germans, who have settled in the towns. The Poles are a peasant people. The rural population is about 7,000,000, the peasants owning about 50 per cent, of the land. The history of ihe country has been a very chequered one. It had a separate constitution from l.sir.-vtO, and a separate government from 1830-64. Ultimately Russia acquired the country, abolished* trial by jury, and prohibited the otlicial use of the Polish lan guage. Part of Poland, notably the province of Posen, belongs to Prussia. The chief town of this province, Posen, is one of the most ancient cities in Poland, and is now strongly fortified. Attached to its cathedral is the famous 'Golden Chapel,' which is adorned with valu able treasures and works of art. Warsa.v, the capital of Russian Poland. Is one of rhe most important and prosperous cities of Eastern ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIG GUNS ON WARSHIPS. SEVENTEEN INCHES IMPOSSIBLE BRITISH MUST BE SUPERIOR. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

BIG GUNS ON WARSHIPS. SEVENTEEN INCHES IMPOSSIBLE BRITISH MUST BE SUPERIOR. 'I know why the German ships are keep ng quiet. They are fining up gigantic 17 inch guns, and ^is soon i»y tiiey arc completed they II come and mash us. Just as they smashed up Liege, Numur, and Antwerp.' Thus the pessimist in the street, who will not believe the British navy is capable of holding Its own against any other. But quite a lot of people who aro not pes simists believe that the Germans are fitting extra huge guns on board their battleships. Their belief, Pearson's Weekly points out, Is wholly wrong, for the simple reason that It Is impossible to fit, say, 17-inch guns on board a battleship that has been built to carry 12-inch guns. When a ship is designed, the very first thing that is considered is the number and size of the guns that are going to be carried. After that there cmncs the speed of the ship. It is not till these facts are told him that the designer makes any attempt to draw up his pl...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War and the Woman [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

War and the Woman ! [?] 'Oil, I low cold it is— how eruully cold! I can write no more, even In- a warm Jii-rsulc. Pcrliajis iMaryska will write hur st;! t soon— horrible thought, I have yet to learn if the ylnld can write at all. When ?slij! reads, she terrifies me with the possi iMUnes. Her acquaintance with the most urcudiul words is a daily fright to me! fclie speaks Kalian and French quite miuiun, ana another language which my lather does not recognise, hut thinks mav lie Jtoumanian. He brought a professor of Oriental languages from one of the Universities here yesterday, but the poor limn was utterly at sea. 1 am sure ho did not understand a single word of what she said— none knew that better than clever .XIaryskal '.She is asking for you every day, and I must tell her that you arc going to America. It is a heavy burden upon my poor shoulders. Yesterday she said, ? Hvcii his friend has gone away.' So, you see, she knows that you were his friend 'and 1 am sure that will not be u...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RUSSIA'S MONSTER AEROPLANES [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

RUSSIA'S MONSTER AEROPLANES A good deal has been heard concerning the British and German aeroplanes, but tho great Sikorsky biplanes used by the troops of the Czar have been rather overlooked. Those machines, invented by a famous Russian named Sikorsky, arc by far tho biggest aero planes being flown in the war— In fact, they are tho largest In the world. They stand 16ft. high, and are about 100ft. wide. The Sikorsky can carry almost as many passen gers as an alrsfllp. Twenty men can bo ac commodated In the large passenger cabin, which is constructed of metal and contains numerous windows. In this machino three engines ani fitted, which give a total of nearly 1000 horse-power, for, owing to the Sikorsky bLplano weighing in itself one and a half tons, and having so large a crew, to carry, it demands high power to pull it off tho ground and keep It In tho air. Tho- weight of the machino has necessi tated an elaborate landing-chassis, composed of numerous springs and pneumatic tubes, so...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REASONS BEHIND THE WAR. THE GREAT GAMBLE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

REASONS BEHIND THE WAR. THE GREAT GAMBLE. Roland G. Usher's interpretations in The Atlantic Monthly of The Reasons Behind the War suggest that Austria's difficulties rather than Germany's ambition were responsible for the determined assault on Servian na- ! tlonality. The scheme outlined by the writer suggests a gigantic gamble with circum stance and fate; ufter outlining the internal dissensions of the various European States, Mr. Usher says: — 'Thus there was a reasonable chance that the Powers would not Interfere to save Servla from chastisement. If they did, and a gen eral European war resulted, there had not been In twenty years anything like us favor* able an opportunity for the Triple Alliance or one as disadvantageous for the Triple En tente. The stake was so immense, the results of success would be so stupendous, so out of proportion, In the case of the Triple Alliance, with what they might lose, that the issue of wur might bo courted wth some assurance. Should they win, su...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DESTROYING A ZEPPELIN. THE DUSSELDORF RAID. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

DESTROYING A ZEPPELIN. THE DUSSELDORF RAID. ''frosting account of the experiences of British prisoners ut OiiHseldorf, nnd of the successful raid mado by Rrltlsh airmen is contained In a letter la tho Times from a fjtihcck correspondent, dated October 2(1. He snys: — During the four weeks that have elnpHed *«ince I left Iwondon for Germany I have seen and learned inoro than ever beforo in so short a time, and my stay has enabled ine to get%an Insight into matters of which a passing traveller could only obtain a very superficial Impression. I went to Germany via Rotterdam— the route I usually take to n«» 10 uusseiuori anu «;oiogne. On arriving at Venlo, the Dutch frontier town, I was tohl that public communication with Germany from that town was suspend ed for at least two .or threo days— nobody si. emed to know why. There was nothing to do but to return and enter Germany by another town further north— Klten by name —the only line then open for passengers to Germany. On my way from E...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ITALY'S POSITION. BROKER IN AN ACTIVE MARKET. POWER AS A NEUTRAL. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

ITALY'S POSITION. BROKER IN AN ACTIVE MARKET. POWER AS A NEUTRAL. In the Atlantic Monthly George B. M'Clel lan describes 'Italy's Position' in a series of chapters which present the economic, politi cal, and social reasons for her neutrality. Italy seems to be in the enviable position of the man who is able to Insist 'Heads I win, Tails you lose':— None of the belligerents wants her sword thrown In the scale aguinst It, while all know that, falling her active support, her neu trality Is of vital importance. She is In the ilelightful position of being feared and courted by all, with nothing to lose and everything to gain by her neutrality. So long as the war lasts Italy must neces sarily be one of the chief sources of supply for both sides, as her -porta are open and her shipping, so much as there is of it. Is free to carry freight and passengers to and from all parts of the world. -Her manufactures, her commerce, and her agriculture will be greatly stimulated, and, should hostilitie...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EMPRESS OF MEXICO. PELTED POPE WITH CAKES. TRAGIC LIFE ROMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

EMPRESS OF MEXICO. PELTED POPE WITH CAKES. TRAGIC LIFE ROMANCE. An iOuiproHM wliu threw a plateful nf caUia .it the head of Ihe l'npe anil net fire to Ills bedroom Is tbe central figure In one nf the most tragic life slorles which lilstnrv pru * i ' . .The story belongs to tho past and Its revival Is due to an Incident of the present war, which occurred In llelgluin. A chateau standing Just lieymul the village of ll.ni- I chol. near Alalliies, now shelters the mail I'.mprcss. a venerable old ladv. For years sho lias lived there iiini..f in. ? ? ..r' i..._ guardians. How the veil was drawn aside to reveal her tragic romance is told l.y the special correspondent of i|„. n„||y Impress! Air. It. 11. I-elbelman, who heard of the inci dent from a refugee from Mallnes One morning, he writes, the Oonnans passed a beautiful chateau surrounded by a stately garden. The Austrian llag was hoi.steil over the house, and two gilt royal crowns adorned tho lop of the entrance gate. The (tennan oillce...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HORSES IN WAR. OCCUPY IMPORTANT POSITION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

HORSES IN WAR. OCCUPY IMPORTANT POSITION. Despite prophecies to tho contrary, the j horse still occupies an important position in modern warfare (says Pearson's Weekly), for the cavalryman is by no means out of date; while in the matter of gun transport horses are equally imlispcnsablo. * The conditions prevailing on active servics when very often large numbers of horses have to be accommodated at some hastily selected camping ground, make it necessary that the animals should be handled efficiently, to pre vent confusion. Hence the formation of Horse j-anes. The tethering of horses in this way serves to secure the largest possible number of animals in the smallest possible space, and It is accomplished thus. Two long ropes are pegged down to the ground purallcl to one another, aud between these ropes the horses stand side by side. Each animal is secured to the rope behind by one of his hind legs, while his halter is secured to the other, the fodder being placed in front of the horse...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOYAL INDIA. INEXHAUSTIBLE RESOURCES. IMPERIAL TOWER OF STRENGTH [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

LOYAL INDIA. INEXHAUSTIBLE RESOURCES. IMPERIAL TOWER OF STRENGTH The response of India to tbe need of the Empire Is the subject of a paper by Saint Nlhal Singh iu the London Maga'/.lne. He ?Jay.-t:-- The Indian soldiers are recruited from such soldierly races as the Rajputs, the Gurkhas, the Mahrattas, the Sikhs, and the fighting i elans of the Mussulmans. They are equipped and trained along European lines. AH the superior officers of the native Anny aro Itriti.sh. there being over 3100 British com missioned, warrant, and uon-comtnlssioncd j officers distributed through the various regiments constituting it. The elfictency of the Cudiau troops has been demonstrated In Mimcroiis campaigns, in tbe peninsula on Us north-west frontier, In Somallland, In Thibet, in China, &i\ The Indian standing army represents but a fraction of India's real fighting strength, llindostau has a large number of races w* h brilliant military feats to their credit, i,treichin,j into the misty pjwst. ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 16 January 1915

In Memoriam. SEDGMAN — In loving memory of John Henry Sedgman, aged 25, who was accidentally killed at Mount Boppy Gold Mine on 19th January, 1914. Inserted by his sorrowing father, John Sedgman and family. LUFF — In sad and loving memory of my dear husband, Albert Hil- ton Luff, who was accidentally killed at Great Cobar mine, 19th January, 1914, aged 36 years. I often sit and think of you. And think of how you died ; But, oh, it was so hard to think I could not say good-bye. Inserted by bis loving wife, Pansy Luff. AYRES. — In fond and loving memory of our dear Bon, Carl James Ayres, who departed this life on 17th January, 1924, aged 11 weeks two days. We watched our darling lily Through anxious night and day. And only turned our eyes from him To look to heaven and pray.   Deal gently with our darling, Was oft our pleading prayer ; Oh, trust me with your precious one. Soft came the Lord's reply. Inserted by his loving parents, A. and C. Ayres.   &...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HUNGER FACTOR. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 20 January 1915

THE HUNGER FACT OB. . In regard to tbo feeding of her popu lation, Gcrmauy will sooner or later be in a tight cornor. She has been ac customed to import about a fourth of hor grain supplies, and all of this has now been cut off. Sho has lost also her winter Bupplies.of herring, and her trade with Denmark and Holland in ag ricultural produce, thouga' it will still go on, must suffer severe : restriction. Once mainly an agricultural and^ food producing country, Germany has in the last thirty years become largely an in* dustrial nation, and the fact is going to tell heavily against her in the course of this war. Tho prospects of -.the Allies, on tho other hand, are excellent.- So long as tho seas are kept open; we can draw an inexhaustible store of food stuffs from1* abroad. Russia, with, her enormous agricultural production, sim ply cannot be starved; and the war, while it has ravaged a considerable sec tifi# of . Northern industrial 'Franco, hap left untouched the msikligHeultural re...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MACHINE-GUNS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 20 January 1915

MACHINE-GUNS. Machino guns aro wjapous which lire cartridges with great speed by mechani cal means, tho forco of the recoil being generally used to reload the gun. They are very portable and exceedingly deadly. A machine-gun can discharge 250 rounds or moro in a single minutb. The British machine-gun is tho Maxim; the French the Hotchkistr; tbo German the Maxim. A Howitzer is shorter and lighter than au ordinary artillery gun, and it used to drop shell into trenches, and a sicgo gun is employed when attacking a fortified position. But siego guns are so heavy' aud ponderous that thoy bocomo dangerous to an army which is not certain of bo* ing able to advance. . ? ? ♦ .*

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GURKHAS' EXPLOIT. AMMUNITION PARK DESTROYED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 20 January 1915

GUBKHAS1 EXPLOIT. AMMUNITION PARK DESTROYED. llow u company of Gurkhas put a* shore by British gunboats near Nicu* port destroyed tho ammunition park depot of a German battery which was galling our mon by firo from a masked position is told by tho 'Petit Var' (says a 'Daily News' Bordeaux mes* sago). At midnight the company arrived in sight of Slype, ono kilometer from the camp surrounding tho ammunition park. Six sentinels wero posted there. Crouch ing in the wood hard by, tho Gurkhas could make out their figures pacing to ami fro with rifles shouldered. The Indians waited half an hour. Presently, in tho stillnoss, a sound like tho croak of a toad was heard, and at this sigual six Gurkhas, each with a knife between his teeth crawled noise* lessly up to the sentinels, who fell with out a sound. The company advanced towards tho ammunition, which was now at its mercy. At one o'clock tho allied staff, waiting anxiously at Nieuport, saw an I immenso flame over Slype, followed by tho roa...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN BARBARISM. "WE HAVE NOTHING TO JUSTIFY." [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 20 January 1915

HERMAN BARBARISM. 'WE HAVE NOTHING TO JUSTIFY.' While tho 'intolloctuals' of tho Gor* man Universities issuo manifestoes to tho world protesting against the charges of barbarism which havo boon brought against thoir 'culturod' nation, ono of thoir Generals gives, expression to what, perhaps, is at preseut the rcnl stato of mind of tho Gormans. 'Let us havo no moro hypocrisy,' ho says. 'What do wo caro for 'chef d'* ocuvres, or for tho opinion of the rest of tho worldl' This is part of what tho German von Disfurth wroto in tho 'Tag,' of Borlin, a translation of which appears in tho 'Echo do Paris' of tho 25th inst.:— 'It is beneath our dignity to defond our troops against tho unjust accusa* tions which have boon mado both at home and abroad. Our troops and our selves owo no explanations to any one; we have nothing to justify, nothiug to oxcuso. ^ All that our soldiers do to bring disaster to tho enemy, to sccuro victory for thoir flag — all that is well done, and all that is justifie...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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