ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ashburton Guardian Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 860 items from Ashburton Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
860 results
Page 4 Advertisements Column 5 [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

Australia has nearly 300,000 acres of untouched forests. IS VERY .DISTRESSING While pain in the stomach is. n«t 1 dangerous, it' is a distressing complaint, and anyone subject to attacks of it will He glad to learn liotv quick '•olief may be had. •• A dose of Chamberlain's Colic and Diarrhoea Remedy in a little water is all that is necessary. It is an ideal remedy for this ailment. It nhva-ys affords prompt relief and is plfw&nt to take. For sale by. Cliomists and. Storekeepers.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
NEW ZEALAND'S RIGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

NEW ZEALAND'S RIGHTS. STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER (Per I'ivss Association.) WELLINGTON, February 25. The following statement was made by the Prime Minister (lit. Hon. W. F Massey) in answer to a question as to the altitude' of the Government in regard to the objection of America to the position given to the Overseas Dominions in the' League: of Nations: — "i could not possibly agree to any suggestion that New Zealand should give up its right to take "part in the League of Nations, as a -Dominion of the British Empire, and as provided in Article 1 of the Covenant, and in the annex to this article. „ "On the contrary, I am conndent that New Zealand will stand with Canada, and insist oil our nationhood as Dominions continuing to be recognised, although always in nationhood with the Empire. "We have to think of the future, rather than of the present, and if we give away our rights and privileges now, or consent to important- reservatio...

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
GERMAN ARMY REDUCED. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

GERMAN ARMY REDUCED. LONDON, February 25. In the House of Commons, replying to questions, Mr Churchill expressed the opinion that the treaty arrangel ments regarding the reduction of the German army were being generally adhered to, but the whole subject had to be watched daily by the inter-allied Commission, headed by Marshal Foch. He was confident that the Commission would safeguard the full execution of the Treaty. There had been hitherto no recalcitration on the part of the German Government, which was carrying out to,the best part of its ability a great many clauses which must be most obnoxious to-it. -

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
WILSON'S TERMS. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

WILSON'S TERMS. SHIPPING AND ADRIATIC. (Received 'February 26,- 10 a.m.) WASHlNg^ON.^Febnmry 20. President Wilson."iiiforMjed 'the Senate that the Allies had agreed the Powers shall retain respectively those German vessels which each Power seized, but where the seized ships exceeded the losses suffered through sinkings by the Germans, the Reparations Commission will deduct the value, of the excess vessels from-the' amount of the reparations Germany must pay. President Wilson's answer to the Allies' .Note regarding the Adriatic question is considered to be the President s final word. One official said that President Wilson thought no further correspondence would be necessary. Rumours from abroad* meanwhile indicate that Britain and France will accede to President Wilson's desire.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
TURKS IN EUROPE. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

TURKS IN EUROPE. LORD BRYCE'S CRITICISM (Received February 26, 10.30 a.m.) ("United Service.) LONDON, February 22. Lord Bryce, in an indignant article in the "Observer," deals historically with Turkish misrule barbarities, and broken promises of reform, extending over eighty years. He declares that permission to the Sultan to remain at Constantinople disgraces the victorious Allies. They have yet time to retract. It is untrue that the Moslems regard the city as sacred. The idea that the expulsion of the Sultan would offend a considerable section of India is grossly exaggerated. The real truth is that Constantinople has serred for many centuries as the focus of intrigue and corruption, in which the seoundrelism of two continents accumulated. It will continue the same under any form .of Turkish occupation.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
PRESS COMMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

PRESS COMMENTS. (Received February 26, 3 p.m.) LONDON, February 25. "The Times," in a leader, says: The Government have committed themselves perhaps irrevocably to a revision of the national war policy as regarda Turkey, without consulting Parliament, and are now attempting to buttress the decision by making play on Indian Moslem feeling. We respect the Moslem religious sentiment, but the Moslem is not entitled to dictate the policy of the Empire. Regarding the Russian position, "The Times" accuses Mr Lloyd George for his own purposes of throwing reluctant Europe into the arms of the Bolshevik seducer. The "Daily Mail" describes the Allies' decision in regard to Russia as a 'half-peace of trade, but not diplomacy. "The "Daily Express" likens it to dancing on eggs.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
NAVAL DEMONSTRATION. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

NAVAL DEMONSTRATION. (Received February 26. 11.30 a.m.) PARIS, February 24. "L'Echo de Paris" says that Francs and Italy are sending warships to join the (British in the Bosphoi;ous in order to demonstrate Allied solidarity.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
HISTORIC TREE FALLS. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

HISTORIC TREE FALLS. AN IMPRESSIVE OMEN. (Received February 26, 10.30 :a,m.) ■(Reuter.) • • JERUSALEM, February .23. The heaviest snowstorm since 1860 occurred yesterweek and caused damage amounting to a quarter of a million sterling. It brought down the famous tree Elbutmi, where culprits were hanged. According to a local tradition, the fall of the tree synchronises with the fall of the Turkish Empire. The populace is most impressed by the omen..

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
INTRIGUES IN GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

INTRIGUES IN GERMANY. (Received February 26, 10.30 a.m.) ("Times.") BERLIN, February 22. A deputation of Turkish officers is visiting Berlin, attempting secret intrigue against the Allies. They assert the insurrectionary movement in Asia Minor is completely consolidated, and exerts powerful pressure on Constantinople, where the authorities no longer consider the signature to peace possible. It appears that the German Government replied it was unable at present to develop relations in Asia Minor. The Press was enjoined to observe complete silence concerning the deputation's movements.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
"A SECOND CONQUEST." [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

"A SECOND CONQUEST." CONSTANTINOPLE, February 23. The news confirming the Turkish tenure of the; city -was hailed by the vernacular press as a second conquest ot Constantinople, wMch probably is not the effect that the Supreme Council desired. The T^u'ks />r.<? $W asy & feho P0SB1" bility of their territory terminating at the Ckutalja line, but it is believed this frontier must be extended' to include Lake Derkos, the source of the city's water supplj.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

Russia leather is the skin of the horse or calf tanned with the bark of the birch, which gives it that peculiar smell which i« so grateful io the senses, and seems to preserye it from the attacks of insects.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
ENGINEERS' STRIKE OVER. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

ENGINEERS' STRIKE OVER. (Per Press Association, Copyright.) MELBOURNE, February 25. It is officially announced that the marine engineers will resume work today. It is anticipated that all the idle ships will be manned to-morrow morning. (The marine engineers' strike started on December 13.)

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
CONCESSION TO SEAMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

CONCESSION TO SEAMEN. SYDNEY, February 25. The inter-State ship owners decided to grant the seamen access to the wharves and ships in search of work, thus removing the main obstacle to the resumption of work. The Seamen's Union is awaiting the same concession from the coastal ship owners. There now only remains the question of the seamen's accommodation. Most of the ships have complied with the provisions of the Navigation Act, there is no fear of a serious hold-up.-1 SYDNEY, February 26. (Received February 26, 10.30 a.m.) The seamen have withdrawn their strike threat. The engineers hold a meeting to-day when it is expected the strike will be declared off. All the marine unions are now ready to resume work.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
RAND DISPUTE. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

RAND DISPUTE. POSITION IMPROVING. (Rceeived February 26, 3 p.m.) CAPETOWN, February 25. The strike amongst the natives em-] ployed in the Johannesburg mines has ! caused much native unrest, including a demand by the native 'house and shop boys for increased wages. ! The position' is now improving and many strikers are resuming. The experiment at one mine where white members volunteered to work to show the natives they were not indispensable had a beneficial effect. At one time fifty thousand natives were affected, and in view of the intimidation methods employed,' police protection was afforded to those resuming. This led to a fracas in a village. Under the impression the force was being; used to compel natives to resume, when, .the police entered the compound the natives attacked with assegais and sticks. The police were compelled to fire,- and about twenty-five natives and ,a number of police and mounted, riflemen were wounded.

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
WAR FORTUNES [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

WAR FORTUNES TAXATION PROPOSALS (Ppr Pi'pk* Association. Copyright.) (Received Feßi'ilffiy 26, 3 p.m.) LONDON, February 25. The Select Committee on the Taxation of War 'Fortunes has opened its investigation under the chairmanship of Sir -William Pearce. The principal witness was Sir JohiV Anderson, chairman of the Board of Inland ■■Revenue, who estimated that the cost of the-, scheme would be onetenth to one-fifth of. 1 per cent, of the amount collected.' He anticipates the tax would be paid to a considerable extent in kind, such as war loan securities. He suggested that provi-. sion bo made for payments by instal-' ments, the liability being assessed at 1 the outset and the payments spread over 10 years. He thought the valuation would affect 540,000 persons, but many individuals would have several valuations on ships, furniture, jewels, instates, etc. Ho further suggested consideration i of :some form of "floating charge,"' which would sufficiently safegua...

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
MR ASQUITH WINS. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

MR ASQUITH WINS. (Per Press Association, Copyright.) (Received February 26, 10 a.m.) LONDON, February 25. Mr Asquith was elected member for Paisley,

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
ABOUT 3000 MAJORITY. [Newspaper Article] — Ashburton Guardian — 26 February 1920

ABOUT 3000 MAJORITY. (Received February 26, 11 a.m.) LONDON, February 25. The Paisley result was as follows: — Asquith/(Liberal) ... 14,736 Biggar (Labour) ... 11,902 Mackean (Coal. Unionist) 3795

Publication Title: Ashburton Guardian
Source: Papers Past [National Library of New Zealand]
Country/State of Publication: New Zealand
x
Loading...
x
x