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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

THE ) u. )il ADVOCAT Vol. XII. I. kJt m e iii IK WM .W A k January, 1900. NEW YEARS AND OLD CHRISTMAS. - A Fond Greeting. A happy New Year in God's name, Who port.oneth our ways, "V Jn whose ilrm hands are held alike The good and evil days; Through whom life, health and liberty The new. born year must bring to thee. ' Deep in his giave the old year lies, Peace to his parting soul! For us another contest waits, For us another goal; And while we strive its heights to read) Let us thank (Jod in thought and &peech. Then while we east a backward glance, On what has gone before, g Vain thought it may be to regret What will return no more; Still, in the future as the past, Our hopes upon the Lord we cast. Hail to the glad New Yew rejoice, Our loins were gird again; "With hope and faith for every task, And love for fellow men; Our trust is in the Eternal Word, Our only anchor is the Lord. , No. 1, V

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

MMHMIHHI y o W l"P iby I TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS AND FRIENDS. The Indian Advocate enters upon its twelfth year. Begun in 1888, it has appeared since in various forms, and has met with great success. Its object is the progress of civilization in the Oklahoma and Indian Territories, by pro moting the spiritual and temporal welfare of the Indian race in particular, and of the settleis in these regions generally. Placed under the protection of Oui Lady of the Rosary, of St. Michael, the Prince of the Heavenly Hosts, and of St. Benedict, the promoter of civilization in ancient and modern times. It has accomplished much good in its humble sphere. The works of the Sacred Heart Mission having steadily increased, its friends and patrons have expressed the desire to hear of them more frequently than once every three months, so as to keep more closely in touch with them; the Directors of the Indian Advocate have, theiefore, judged that, with the beginning of a new century, the little review should ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

V w Abbeys in the past and present, accounts and analyze of notable books, writings, etc. With the issue of this first number we call upon our readers and friends to continue us their generous support 0 and good will, by early sending in the price of their sub scription, by making the Indian Advocate known among their acquaintances and informing us of all such news that may be of interest to the readers of our review in any of the lines just mentioned. In this expectation, we wish to all a thrice happy New Year 1900; and may the first year of this Twentieth Century be a prosperous one for the work we carry out for God's greater honor, by the advancement and education of the Indian tribes, and the settlers in the Twin Territories that offer such a fertile field to missionary zeal and Catholic apostleship. kw 1 REPORT OF The Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions for Year Ending October 1, 1899. The Bureau of Indian Missions, Washington, D. C, Oct. 1899. f His Eminence, .lames Cardinal Gi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

IF7W ,lfil;W"'w',yi'y iwyr,ifffrfpy' H-4 J fiscal year 1895. The actual amount thereby made avail able for Catholic schools is $57,642, which has been allotted to the several schools in operation last year by contracts entered into between the Honorable Commissioner of Indian Affairs and the respective school superintendents. Contracts have also been granted Catholic schools among the Osage Pottawatomie tribes, pavable out of the funds of said tribes, aggregating $20,875. The value of the rations and clothing furnished the pupils attending certain of the schools, but not provided for by contiact, is estimated at $25,000 The grand total obtained from the Government for the care and tuition of Indian pupils at our contract schools during the current fiscal year is, therefore, $113,417. In this connection, I beg to state, as a matter of genei il interest, that the total amount of money obtained fiom the Government for the support of Catholic Indian schools from the date of the organiza...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

r- This Congressional declaration will be urged by many as a reason for refusing to grant another appropriation, and will, without doubt, have weight with many members of Con gress, and may be the means of defeating the effort we pur pose making in behalf of our Schools. Hence, at the close I of the current fiscal year i. e., June 30, 1900 we may be confronted with the problem, what is to be done to main the twenty-five contract schools now in operation with their 2,000 Indian pupils? Even now these schools are able to maintain their present attendance only by reason of the fact that Rev. Mother Katharine Drexel, O. S. B., has supple mented the Government appropriations by contributions from her private funds, thereby enabling the schools to care for a large number of pupils in excess of the number paid for by the Government. This aid, however, cannot be ex pected to go on forever; Indeed, it may cease at the end of this year. At all events this burden should not be imposed upon any...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

and Negro missions will, I take the liberty of suggesting, not meet the requirements of the case. The mere reading of the Notice, with a few perfunctory remarks, in the vari our Churches on the Sunday preceding and the Sunday on which the collection is taken up, arouses little or no interest among our people. And if it should happen frequently, as it did one year when I was present, that the notice was read one Sunday without comment, and the following Sunday was not even read, it should not be a matter of surprise that the appeal on behalf of this worthy cause is not responded to with a very great degree of liberality. On more than one occasion I have recommended that the needs of our Indian missions and schools be brought to the attention of the faithful by the men who are working among and devoting, their lives to the Indian who, from actual experience and knowledge, know the wants of our Red brethren and what they surfer, and thereby arc best fitted to give an intelligent idea o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

the attention of the Most Rev. Archbishops at their meeting this month, accompanied, I trust, by the endorsement of M Yonr Eminence and Your Graces. 3. In my report for 1898, I called attention to the fact that the Indian Department refused to recognize the right of Indians having trust funds or other moneys due them under treaty stipulations in the Treasury of the United States to have a voice in their disposition in the matter of providing an education for their children. Because of this action of the Department it will be necessary to appeal to Congress, and therefore an effort will be made next winter to induce that body to enact legislation that will require the Secretary of the Interior, in cases where such Indians shall make choice of a school or schools where they desire their children to be educated, to allow the use of said funds to meet the expenses of providing the children with an educa tion in the schools so chosen. Such a measure, if it becomes a law, while no more th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

5jri-i!W W- r p W 7 JFW " -T rvr-w. r wrr fT "kr"T'T!r;T 1 tJf " bors among the Indians and his willingness to leave nothing undone to embarrass our work and thwart our efforts in thai field of labor; to carry out this purpose using the columns of "The Red Man," a paper published by his school at Gov ernment expense, to disseminate slanders upon our Indian missionaries and attacks upon the methods of the Church, and consorting with the A. P. A. in order to defeat appro priations for our Indian schools. Since then he has given further evidence of his enmity to the Church. He was present at the Indian Teachers' In stitute, held at L,os Angeles, Cal., July 20 to 27, 1899, and of which he seemed to be the guiding spirit. In the course of public discussions he took occasion more than once to at tact the Church and its missionary work among the Indians, alleging that the Church hindered the Americanizing and civilizing of the Indian; that uthe Church keeps up a parochial school system in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

known as the "Browning ruling," which denies the right of an Indian parent to decide where his children shall attend school the exact language being "the Indian parents have no right to' designate which school their children shall at- jlj tend." At the same time I pointed out the danger that threatened our Indian schools if this ruling was put into practical effect. Most Rev. Archbishop Ireland, of St. Paul, and Right Rev. Bishop O' Gorman, of Sioux Falls, realizing this dan ger, last winter urged the Hon. Commissioner of Indian Af fairs (Mr. Jones) to rescind this ruling, but that official de clined to accede to their wishes. The rule is being enforced everywhere in the Indian country, not only to force children who would otherwise attend Catholic schools into Govern ment schools, but to compel children who were in atten dance at Catholic schools last year to go to Government schools this year. I have received letters within the past month from the superintendents of two of our lar...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

10 schools depends upon it. The Indian Department, however, is committed to its enforcement. A higher power must therefore be invoked. How this shall be done, and when, I leave for Your Eminence and Your Graces, in your wis dom, to determine, but beg to submit the suggestion that the Most Rev. Archbishops at their next meeting be ap praised of this menace to our Indian missionary work, in the hopes that a course of action will be decided upon that will secure the revocation at an early day of this most ob jectionable ruling. In conclusion permit me to add that, although we were led to believe in the beginning that the present Administra tion was kindly disposed towards the Catholic Church, and at all times prepared to accord her fair, considerate treat ment in all matters affecting her interest so far as the Gov ernment was concerned, it cannot be truthfully asserted that these fair promises have been fulfilled. In fact, in my opinion, quite the contrary is the case. In her Indian s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

rejsr'ra '''' uffiP 11 I it' I .V matters, only to be broken. Commission after commission was appointed, but not a single Catholic was upon them, j wnne -prominent rrotestants ana otners notoriously antago nistic to the Catholic Church were placed upon them, who, ill their reports, went out of their way to disseminate libels upon the Catholic clergy of Cuba, Porto Rico and the Phil ippine Islands. A ready ear is turned to the requests and demands of protestant divines, but scant courtest is shown the respeclful petitions of dignitaries of our Church. There fore I have no hesitation in asserting that the Administra tion now in power is not our friend, or even disposed to ac cord us ordinary justice. And I for one, as a Catholic and an American citizen, feel it my duty here to record my pro test against this unjust and unfair treatment. With high esteem, v Your faithful servant in Xt., J. A. Stephan, Director. The above report speaks for itself, and needs no com ment. It is evident th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

12 ' work, and these funds can be procured only by subscrip tions and by liberal contributions. It is their earnest wish to be able to admit free into their parochial School and Col lege all Indian children of the Territories and the vicinity; but to do so since their own resources are limited and small, they are to rely on their friends and the friends of the In dians, so inhumanly and unjustly dealt with, until some equitable way may be found for the redress and remedying of the wrongs Catholics are aware and complain of, and against which Rev. J. A. Stephan uttered such strong, but not too strong protest. The Catholic Indians, the Catholics at large claim only fair and just treatment, as the Constitu tion of the U. S. declares emphatically: (tthat all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, lib erty and the pursuit of happiness." If the word Liberty means anything, it means principally that Indians ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

"TgWH-T ?"B ,rr''W W1'1 WlEJWill "'ww""""' mwiw" -Jf-wwsp ,. - - f 'j. ; 13 read that there arc Indian Reservations in Oklahoma aggregating near ly live and one-half million acres, much of it the best agricultural land. The contract has been let to build three Indian school -houses in Oklahoma. They are to be built in the Kiowa Reservation; one at Riveiside, one at Fort Sill and one at Rainy Mountain. Since 1890 the Benedictines have a prosperous mission in that Reservation and a school taught by eight Franciscan Sisters. The Indians do not care for Godless education. The Catholics of O'Keene have secured a site and will build a Church. Muskogee Catholics, Creek Nation, have held a fair which netted them $250. Ardmore, with her Soldier Priest, had a fair also, and, if we are well-informed, the Chickasaws beat the Creeks in generosity. General Porter has been installed as Chief of the Creeks without a revolution, and the Creeks are to be congratulated. The Otoe Indians have notified ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

BIF f" r, r J ST. PATRICK'S MISSION. Christmas was, indeed, a happy day at St. Patrick's Mission, when eighteen children of the fierce Caddo and bold Kiowa tribes received their first Holy Communion. Seventeen pupils of the same school also received the regenerating waters of Baptism. The work of the Pastor, Reverend Isidore Ricklin, and his zealous assistant, the Reverend Blias Fink, is certainly blessed with success, as it is quite perceptible. Visitors, on beholding these children, cannot be but deeply impressed by their simplicity and earnestness. There are at present eighty children in school, the number being smaller than in former years, forty-six children of the fa mous "Geronimo band" have been compelled to attend school at Fort Sill. These children, since their coming from Alabama five years ago, have been at the Mission, and, needless to say, have become endeared to their teachers; all were baptized, enrolled in the League of the Sacred Heart, and twenty were monthly comm...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

15 main firm to the instructions received while at school. He departed, promising to return soon again. jl in M and zealous Missionaries. Can anything be more grand or more sublime? No; for is not this the same work performed by our Divine Savior while here on earth? It takes years of toil and patience to accomplish a small portion, but how consoling to the good fathers are the words of the Gospel: "Those who instruct others shall shine as stars in the firma ment for all eternity." Our Divine Lord very often permits His Disciples 4JP see the fruit of their labors; not for vanity sake, for the Monks of St. Benedict are strangers to such, but solely to encourage them to cultivate more souls to the Heart of Jesus. This is what may be termed a uWork of Love n where the human nature cannot understand its depths, and God alone knows the full extent of good accomplished. It has been remarked that u those who work well in the depths more easily understand the heights, for in their true natu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

f-f rTT7T PTffflWWfrj7"r gPFT"" 10 1 Ilk J T '"'WTVTip i" f TW, Tf INDIAN ADVOCATE Published by the Benedictine fathers i OF Sacred Heart Mission, Oklahoma Territory.. D A Bi-Monthly Eeview under the protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Eosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Et. Eev. Theo. Meerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Okla homa and Indian Territories. Entered as second-class mail matter at Sacred Heart Postolfiee, O. T. TEEMS: Single Copies 15c. Annual Subscription 50c. Fifteen or more copies sent to one and same address, each 35c. Foreign GOc. . PEIVILEGES: 1. Every subscriber and benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the religious at Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every first Friday of the month in honor of the Sacred Ileart, for the intentions of subscribers and benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every first Saturday of the month for our departed friends, subscribers and benefactors. 4. Every-year, in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

17 ST. BENEDICT'S MEDAL. Crux Sancti Patns Benedict!. Crux Sacra Sit Mltai Lux. Non Draco Sit Mihi Dux. Vade Retro Satana Nunquam Suade Mihl Vana; Sunt Mala Libas Quae Ipso Venena Bibas. TJMTlirgT": The Gross of Holy Father Benedict. Oh. may the Cross a light be unto me And not a guide the wicked enemy. Get thee b3hlnd me, Satan! Never suggest vain things to me. Evil are the draughts thou offerest. Mayst thou drink thy own poison. We are frequently requested by some of our readers to. give them information concerning the Medal of St. Bene dict, its origin, uses, effects, meaning, etc. It is to comply with this pious request that we publish today in the Indian Advocate the following sketch: 1. ORIGIN OF THE MEDAL OF ST. BENEDICT." The origin of this Medal is very ancient. According , to tradition, it has to be traced up to St. Benedict himself. In fact, there is preserved even to this day, in Subiaco, the first Monastery where St. Benedict lived, a cross which it is said belonged to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

18 . words: uO, God omnipotent, grant through the interces sion of our Holy Father St. Benedict, that these medals, letters and characters, which you have yourself designed" which words seem to indicate that God Himself revealed to St. Benedict the meaning of the letters, and also the letters that appear on the medals. So far, then, we may conclude that the cross and the the inscription it bears can be attributed safely to St. Bene dict. As to the question, "when and where the first medals .were struck," it is not easily answered. History does not mention the existence of these medals before the ioth cen tury, After the ioth century, up to the 16th even, little mention is made of them. It was onlyin 1647 that s medal acquired a great celebrity and a wide-spread circulation. It happened thus: The inhabitants of Natternberg, in Bavaria, being infested by venomous serpents, and attributing the presence of these animals to the influence of the Devil, applied to the Monks of the Monaster...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

19 BENEDICTINE NEWS. A GIFT OF POPE LEO XIII TO THE BENEDICTINES. Our Holy Father the Pope, L,eoxm, has donated 25,000 lire -(5,000 dollars) to the Abbot of Monte Cassino, in Italy, to help him to repair the chapel where the body of St. Bene dict was laid beside that of his sister, St. Scolastica. The grave of the Holy Patriarch was desecrated during the Bar barian incursions, and his body was carried away, but part of it was restored afterwards, and the Monks of Monte Cas sino preserve this precious relic with jealous care. The letter of the Pope accompanying this generous do nation is given in full below: POPE LEO XIII ON THE BENEDICTINE ORDER. Some Catholic papers of South Germany pmblish the following letter, addressed by Pope Leo xin, to D. Boniface Krug, Abbot of Monte Cassino: To our beloved son, greeting and apostolic Benediction The Monastic Order which has inherited from its founder, St. Benedict, besides the holiest of teachings, a wonderful activity and power of enduranc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1900

20 and surroundes it with a particular affection, with the pur pose of restoring to it its former glory. But in considering the ancient glory of this order, we could not help thinking first of the Monastery of Monte Cas sino. In this Monastery, indeed, was your order most flourishing; and many men conspicuous for the services they rendered to society and religion, to the state and to the Church, were trained within its walls. For this reason we consider it but just that after having already given many proofs of our generosity to the Bene dictines in general, we should also in the Monastery of Monte Cassino erect a monument of our affection. And as we learned that you intended to bestow your care on ornament ing more worthily the tomb and its vaults where the remains of your Holy Founder are venerated, we have decided to contribute our share to the same end. We, therefore, do nate and consecrate 25,000 lire ($5,000) to this purpose, and have commissioned our beloved son, Francis Sato...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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