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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

Loss in Cooking Potatoes. In a recent bulletin (No. 43), of the department of agriculture, the results were given of a series of experiments on cooking potatoes. The purpose was to ascertain in what way of cooking these vegetables there was the least loss. These experiments were made in sev eral ways. In one case the potatoes were peeled, soaked in water from three to five hours and cooked in dis tilled water, cold at the beginning. In the second, the potatoes were; peeled, not soaked, and cooked in soft water, alkaline water, and hard water, all cold at the beginning, also In the same waters, hot at the beginning. The third experiment was made with potatoes with the skins on, without soaking, an I cooked in all the previously mentioned waters cold at the beginning and hot at the beginning. Analyses were made of the potatoes after cooking in each case in the result only of which our readers are interested. The greatest loss occurs when the potatoes an peeled and soaked in cold water...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY. In the interests of the Farmers.Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Absorbed the '•Washington State Monthly." PUBLISHED BY THE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFFICES - SEATTLE, WASH BUSINESS OFFICES: SEATTLE. - - 315-316 Pioneer Block SPOKANE, Suite F Hypotheek Bank Building Subscription, in advance «-l per year. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer Block, Seattle, Wash What is the main object (or aim) in our lives? What is it in your life? We believe it is the same for every one whoever he may be un less he be one who has no worthy objecta vagabond or a hobo." We are not considering those. This object is improvement, progress or whatever you call it. Isn't it? Perhaps, though, some one of you will confess that your main aim is to acquire more wealth. Bat what do you want the wealth for? Isn't it so you may have more home comforts, better machinery, less ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

BUZZINQS. By Mrs. Chas. bee. Our bees gathered pollen last spring the 19th of February; they are a few days later this year. The next invention to help the apiar ist is to be a section cleaner. I hope we can use it with this season's crop. We had two heavy colonies lose their queens about January first. They left sealed brood, and queen cells capped, when they died. I never thought it would make any material difference in the wintering of a colony of bees if they did lose their queen in winter. But now I don't know.. When we first began to use plain sep arators our honey would be bulged at the bottom ; but now we shove the sep arator down }£ inch and almost invari ably have nice smooth work done. Now is the time to spend all your leisure moments in fitting and repairing hives where necessary, filling supers and doing other odd jobs which are needed about the apiary, so as not to keep the bees waiting when the honey How co nes. J. B. Haines, in Gleanings, says he once gathered a bush...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

10 Lambing on the Range. A wool grower in Montana has a very good method of managing young lambs where there are a great num ber. He uses tags, or moeis, some three inches long, with numbers print ed in large figures, the numbers run ning to iw, each number in duplicate on another card and each lanio, as soon as born, is tagged, and aiso its mother. The tags are in bunches of different colors. Of the size made the number can be read at a great distance irom the animal. We give below other items that he gives about his methods: --V » _-'_ Culul.tl i'.ljjr.. We lamb our bands of ewes in bunches ot' from 1,500 to, say, 3,000. i_acb twelve or twenty-four hours' drop is kept in a bunch by itself until it is thiee to five days old. These bunches number, according to condi tions, trom forty to 160. This, of course, necessitates the Keeping ot six to t/.gnt of these bunches on grass with no fences until tne oldest are a week old, when they are put into the •lamb band,'* a band which is seld...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

Experiments With Hens. Bulletin No. 51 of the Utah Experi ment station, has been received. In it are reported results of poultry experi ments conducted at the station during the year ending November, 1897. A number of experiments are reported, and in some cases the results are very positive. They include tests of old hens and pullets for egg production; of the value of exercise; of the value of crossing pure-breeds; of the relative egg-liking qualities of Brown Leg horns, Barred Plymouth Rocks, Light Brahmas and a Brahma- cross. The animal food cost* per fowl of the different breeds, and the yearly pro duction of eggs per hen were impor tant features of the experiments. The relative value of old eggs and fresh eggs for hatching was also tested. An incubator test was conducted. A num ber of half-tone cuts are reproduced, which include one of the poultry build ings, several" photographs of fowls and of two baskets of eggs, one a very large basket representing the laying of pullets, th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

12 Another Oreen Fruit Shipper. Mr. Note, who has an extensive orchard near Medford, and is an ex tensive shipper of peaches, last season shipped a carload or green peaches to Montreal and met with an experience similar to that of other green fruit shippers. When the returns were all in he discovered that he was minus his fruit and was in addition indebted to the transportation companies about 25 cents per box. He also learned for the first time, when his freight bills were received, that a. duty of nineteen cents per box had to be paid on peaches shipped from the United States into Canadian territory. Mr. Nutt says, through the Corvallis Times, that the Southern Oregon fruit grower nets about 35 cents per box for peaches in an average season. He is making arrangements to ship peaches to Corvallis during the com inr; season. A Household Economics Qlub. There is a club in Fremont, Wash., called the Wednesday P. M. club. It has two departments, literary and household economics. The di...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

THE riARKETS. SEATTLE. Jobbing quotations; what produce is selling at in round lots. Potatoes are firm. Reports come from Yakima of an Eastern demand and some are being shipped. Inquir ies are also being made here from the same source; this ought to have a ten dency to strengthen the potato market. Yakimas, $14@15 per ton; natives $11 @13; carrots, per sack, 50c. Beets, per sack, 75c; turnips, 50c; car rots, $7 a ton; celery, 35@40c per doz; hothouse lettuce, 45c; radishes, 10c; onions, $50@60 per ton; cabbage, l^c per lb for California; 2c, for native; Hubbard squash, 2c per lb; pumpkins, lc per lb; parsnips, per sack, 65@75c; cauliflower, $1 per doz; rhubarb, 10c per lb; beans, 2V_@3i_c. Apples, Spitzenberg, are selling at $2; Baldwin, $1@1.50; native, 75c@$l; green apples, 50@75c; red apples, 75c $1.25. 2*2-2,2. Mlllstuffs—Bran, per ton, $17; shorts, per ton, $18@199. Feed—Chopped feed, $18@20 per ton; middlings, per ton, $24; oil cake meal, per ton, $35. Nuts— give the following...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

14 About Fruit Raising, From Ex perience. By "Uncle" Henry Hug, at the La Grande Farmers' Institute. Fruit raising has nearly always been my business, from boyhood till now. Therefore, what I say on this subject is not theory; it is simply ex perience, practice—in short, my own observation. The Oregon fruit (Eastern Oregon of course, included), is indeed an ex cellent, healthy and a fine-flavored product, if the fruit is well matured or ripe, and the orchard carefully kept or well managed. I do not. think any country on this globe can surpass Oregon in fruit culture in the same zone or climate. ! Oregon apples are entirely free of worms. They are sound through and through. Can people of Southern re gions say that of their apples? No, indeed! The worms in apples are surely a nuisance. Situation For an Orchard. Whoever starts an orchard in Union county should select a place on elevat ed ground, sloping to the south or west, instead of a low place, for two reasons: First—The orchard wi...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

Fruit Growers Busy. Most of the fruit growers of Clarke county have been busy for several weeks past pruning their orchards, February being generally considered the most favorable month for per forming this important work. The orchards throughout the county are in good condition at present, the weather during the winter having been most - favorable, and from present Indica tions, there will be a big crop of fruit the coming season. About March 1 the spraying season will commence, and while there are very few orchards in the county which can be said to be infected to any extent, few will be al lowed to go without spraying. Sold All Cockerels Advertised. Sponkane, Wash. Editor Ranch and Range: Having sold about all . the cockerels I can spare, please change my add. to read like the enclosed copy. Have just returned from a trip to California. Washington is the best field for the poultry industry on the coast. D. H. DWIOHT. Good Demand For Good Stock. W. A. Conant, the well known breede...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

,_E-____-Y _E=»XJ__v_:_E~S A-AA^77-^7-'- IN THE MARKET. I^^AjL^LW^mmv SEND FOR Imperial Nozzle. fAw/ Bordeaux Nozzle. Awf \\ CATALOGUE 11 Bean Hydrolic Tump. Vermo rel Nozzle. .- Hop Nozzel Myers Bucket and Barrel , MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO., 308-310 First Aye. South. Seattle, Wash. 1892 VASHON COLLEGE 1898 BURTON, WASHINGTON. Classical, Scientific, Normal and Commercial Courses. ALSO ; Musical, Elocutionary and Preparatory. Open to both Sexes. All Denom- j inations. Military Training for Boys and Young Men. FREE TEXT BOOKS. NO EXTRAS. | * _ Healthful Location. Convenient to Seattle and Tacoma. $175 pays tuition, board i Room, Light and Heat for FORTY WEEKS. j \ ' > : K~7/ ' ' "- v->l'' • ■ 1 Teachers' Summer Normal, six weeks, total expense, $25. j For Catalogue and Announcements address a postal card to j PpES. A. C. JONES, Ph. D. THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

And Range yW <o*W ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- Vol. 3, No. 49. - ; ***■ i . ■. - -.. _■ ' A _ _ _ A A a am a IJ LARGEST ASSORTMENT | In the Pacific Horthuuest of It jAgricultural Implements! *M Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. ft I Everything that a Farmer Needs. | I WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS: I "BABY- DE LAVAL HAND SEPARATORS. gj&k m MPEOVE VIUTA MM. I CAPACITIES INCREASED DE- __^W iRH 11111HU F A lUUJt JJAltllJlO* gg» "^B SIGNS IMPROVED. ■-' I is *"- BUTTER UNS*«-ABLE -That this is a positive fact & Make Them Cheaper Than Before. I lt%k P^S-*****^ now actually obliged to turn down farm butter! be! &- Baby No. 3 -Guaranteed 675 pounds per hour. A 3__**----___^**________ «P. to th standard of the public taste, and ere long it will |^ Baby No. 2—Guarantee! 350 pounds *er hour. M ______-Ww__l___^t§B_|^ result of this latest phase of the butter ques'ton." some E*» ___■ Baby No. 1-Guaranteed 250 pounds per hour. ■Mn^l______ES__^^Sb fanners are thTtbey out their inrtffd...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

2 DO YOU contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this -ogspg^ coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on ap plication. ■;"/ -■j&i Oi'n P<s_ ,^rfc^^^^ Threshers, Tanks :^^^33]^^^^^^^^i stackers, Qatar IVTiHc '^SSnf!!^ Horse Powers, THE "RUSSELL" Compound Traction Engine takes the lead. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner. Write us for particulars. _*-* —i_ —| -m g*± > Russell & Co., 320*324 Belmont Street D _T_ V+ ICIFI _H C^\ m^f^CXaCiY^* 160466 East First Street 1 UI LICII Id* VyiA/gVU. The Annie Wright Seminary, x: x: x 2£ 2£ 2£ Tacoma, Washington, A) A) A .« « _______ *V A, _*____BP*-' t -•, -»«*•* -»♦ attended this school in the ___■■**_■* X\T^\ It has an income from an |3 *• ' - ?■__■"' "' ifrTfffflMfet •c j _ c j p cinn i "/ -^ :r:^^k Thirteen Teachers, Endowment Fund ot $XXV 3Wi : i■ M -j J-^5 *m!_b r^r, __« j „_b _Jh - lia...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 3, No. 49. Words of Encouragement. Editor Ranch and Range : lam glad your efforts to establish a paper giving such a range and variety of news are so successful. The pioneers of the Northwest have such a range of acquaintances scattered over the country from which the news is collected it is almost impossible to read a number without finding an item of interest concerning some one they know. It also keeps us posted in the progress of the leading industries of the state and gives information of practical use. I am glad to see an awakening of re cognition of the existence of our Agri cultural College—its necessity and prac tical help to farmers. I spent a week there last fall and my belief in the need of .such methods of instruction was strengthened by the manifestations of personal in tercet by the teachers. I felt as if it would be a delight to remain as a student among 'the beautiful sur ronndings and restful, kind, mental atmosphere. I hope its present good pr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

I Northwest Wool Growers' Con vention. A quarter of a thousand sheepmen gathered at The Dalles, Or., last week in attendance at the First Convention of Sheepmen of the Pacific Northwest States. It opened its sessions Tuesday and closed Thursday evening. A strong organization was effected, assuring the sheepmen all the benefits that co-oper ation will bring. It was a harmonious meeting from beginning to end. The citizens of The Dalles did everything within their power to make the con vention a success and the stay of the visitors as pleasant as possible. The Commercial Club, which opened to them its luxuriantly appointed quar ters, gave its aid to the association and rendered much assistance in hospitably entertaining those who were in attend ance. Some of the most prominent breeders and specialists in the United States were present. At the opening session the president of the Commercial Club delivered a welcoming address, followed by Mayor M. T. Nolan, extending to the members the f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

Early Lambing. J. D. C. Thiesen, of Lewiston, Idaho, finished lambing 1,000 ewes about January 1 and raised about 950 lambs. This is a remarkable record for the time of year. He had sheds for them, but he did not need them. The ewes had been summered on grass and con tinued through the lambing season on pasture. 'He was prepared to feed them on hay in case of storm, but did not need it this year. He raises these lambs early and they bring a very fancy price,, as high as 40 per cent, above that received by those which lamb later. Another very ad vantageous feature of this early lamb ing system is that the ewes that he wishes to cull out and prepare for market wean their lambs four months earlier in prime condition for the fall market; giving the ewes opportunity to fatten upon the green feed. The old sheep fatten quicker on grass and ■ mountain weeds than on dry feed, and the former costs nothing. Mr. B. C. Birtleson, who gave us this item, ex presses the opinion that this method is ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

_ Preservation of Moisture. Dr. James Withycombe, state veterin arian of Oregon, gave an interesting talk at the Arlington Farmers' institute on "Conservation of Moisture." This is an important subject to the people who depend on tilling the semi-arid land east of the mountains. He said: "The most important consideration from an agricultural point of view, which confronts the farmer in semi arid regions, is how he can best con serve the moisture of his land. "The wheat lands of Eastern Oregon are practically inexhausuole beds of fertility, and the only thing that this section needs to convert it into a verit able agricultural paradise is more moisture. "Water is the most important factor in the growth of all plants, therefort farmer**' situated in arid regions should study the principles that govern the conservation of moisture. A plant can be likened to an exquisitely sensitive machine, depending upon its ability to utilize four factors, namely, heat, light, food and water. "If the...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

Butter Making. By Clara V. Lanham. Butter making has been written upon so often that one would think nothing more remained to be said; it is found in nearly every agricultural paper that you , pick up; and has been discussed at farmer's institutes by competent lec turers who explained every detail of the whole process. After all that has been said on the subject, do we see any per ceptible change in the product of the average butter maker? No! Visit any market place and see what piles of strong-smelling stuff —called buttergreet your eyes. It is streaked, mottled, and of every shade from white to deep yellow. A person accustomed to eating the genuine article would not think of tasting such "stuff," but many persons are compelled to eat it as they cannot procure any better. It would seem, notwithstanding all the advice given on butter making, that it will bear repeating a few more times till all shall become educated in the process. Absolute cleanliness must be practiced from beginni...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

"8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY. In the intereats of the Farmers.Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Absorbed the 'Washington State Monthly." PUBLISHED BY THE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFFICES - SEATTLE, WASH BUSINESS OFFICES: SEATTLE. - - 315-316 Pioneer Block SPOKANE, Suite F Hypotheek Bank Building Subscription, in advance »l per year. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer Block, Seattle, Wash During the past few weeks all the fruit inspectors ought to have been busy and from all reports they have been. And they should still be active, for on their faithful, zealous work, and the earnest wcrk and co-operation of the fruit grow ers at this season, depends very largely the best success of the fruit crop this year. If this is and has been neglected, the result will be wormy and diseased fruit, and dis eased and dying trees. If you have not sprayed yet, be sure to do so and before do...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

Sugar Beets. By C. A. Granger. Mr. Granger, who will be the super intendent of the La Grande sugar fac tory, Oregon, has been superintendent of the Lehi, Utah, factory, for five years. Previous to that time he was identified with the industry at Alvar ado, Cal. He has a thorough knowledge of the business, having been a grower of beets before going into the factory. He says, concerning this industry: There is no industry in which the producer, the manufacturer and the consumer are so. closely associated as in the beet-sugar j business. Each is dependent on the other, in the fullest sense, and should work in harmony. Without the factory the farmer has no market for his beets, and without the farmer to grow the beets, it is im possible to operate a factory. The grower deals directly with the manu facturer without the intervention of a middle man or any commission charges. The ; manufacturer must pay a fair price to justify the farmer in continuing to raise the crop, and ' the latter mu...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 March 1898

10 Fruit, and One Way to Better the Quality. In order for a fruit grower to lie the most successful he must excel his com petitors in the quality of his product, in his methods of marketing and in the management of his finances. There is rarely or never a glut of first-class frui but there is a great over supply of the poorer grade of apples. One of the ways of raising a better quality of fruit is by thinning the fruit. 'I'll inning. -~ The stock in trade of a tree is stored up during the growing season one year, to be expended in foliage growth and fruit the succeeding year. Self-preser vation is the rule with plants and trees, as well as man and animals; hence, the first duty of a tree is to protect itself. To this end the tree uses its store of nutri ment first for its own growth and pro tection. Whatever amount of nutriment is left after self-preservation, the tree gives to the production of fruit. This seems to tie contrary to experience, since we know an injured tree will form...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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