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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

September/October 1991 A chemical has spilled: Now what do you do? Three things By HILTON M. WITHERS \bur first priority is the safety of people any time there is an accidental spill of agricultural chemicals. All actions should be taken with this priority in mind. Immediately determine: Is there danger to people or property? What chemical spilled? Can some quick, simple action control the spill and prevent further problems? Do not leave the scene, except to protect yourself or others from contamination. Keep everyone not involved in helping —especially children —far away from the site. Send someone to call the local fire department. With people safely away, start looking for ways to eliminate the hazard. Remember the three Cs: • Control: Stop the spill. • Contain: Stop the spread of the spilled product. • Cleanup: Remove the spilled material and any contaminated surroundings and dispose. Control: This means closing the container, uprighting the jug, or blocking the f10w... But befo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

12 Discussion Meet topics timely; Polaris providing prize all-terrain vehicle With the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's convention just months away, it is time to start gearing up for the 1991 Discussion Meet. We are really excited about this year's topics and prizes. We believe the topics are timely and it would be beneficial for all of us to become better informed in these areas, whether it be as a contestant or as a concerned agriculturalist. The topics for this Discussion Meet are • What is the role of land grant universities for meeting the needs of commercial farmers? • How can the American Farmer and rural areas continue to receive adequate health care at reasonable prices? • Conservation—How does it affect a farm's future? • What is the role of agriculture in reducing the United States' dependence on foreign oil? If you would like further information on the competition, your county chairman should have a copy of the Discussion Meet manual for 1991. As you can see, the topic...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

September/October 1991 Bailey (Continued from Page 4) was the widow of a Farm Bureau friend, Phil Hickman Sr. of Accomack County. Bailey knew the Hickmans well from nights of planning Farm Bureau strategy at annual meetings. Mrs. Hickman was widowed for two years and Bailey was divorced for two years when they met again Bailey and she were married almost two years when she died of lung cancer. Phil and Mary Louise Hickman's son, David, is president of the Accomack County Farm Bureau, and with his brother, Phil, operates Shamrock Farms there. The other children are John and Ann A pond and picnic shelter make the Hailey farm a perfect setting for a family Arbor group gives trees for joining The National Arbor Day Foundation is giving 10 Colorado Blue Spruce trees to each person who joins the foundation. The free trees are part of the nonprofit foundation's Trees for America program. "They lend beauty to their surroundings with their silver blue-green color and compact conical shape. T...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

14 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 15) WOODEN GLIDDERS, STEPSTOOLS. CaM N. Brann (804) 529-7209. BUYING AUTOGRAPHS—AUTOGRAPHED PICTURES. Famous people. All fields, living or dead. Top prices paid. Free evaluation. Send list or photocopies. Free catalog most wanted autographs. Phone (804) 528-0652. Or write: Irvin Burnell, c/o NSF, Box 2257, Lynchburg, VA 24501-0257. PLASTIC POTS, one gallon, slightly used, 10 cents, quantity discounts. English Boxwood 12-15 in., reasonable. (804) 983-2173. WILL FORMS. Will information, fill-in instructions. 2/$3, 4/$4. NSF Services, Box 2257, Lynchburg, VA 24501-0257. FREE GRANTS FOR COLLEGE and Graduate school! Scholarships, Fellowships, Loans, Awards. Billions Available! Results 100% guaranteed! Send $3 (refundable) for brochure, instructions, questionnaire. Nationwide Scholarship Finders. Box 2257, Lynchburg, VA 24501-0257. HISTORIC LOG CABIN. Will dismantle and deliver. (804) 286-2858 or (804) 286-3475. Other materials also. FOR SALE: Se...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

September/October 1991 FOR SALE—A JERSEY HEIFER. Call (703) 755-4286 after 6:00 PM. Cana, VA. BULLS—REGISTERED ANGUS. Eight—Rent or sell. Graperidge Farm, Goochland, VA 23063. (804) 784-5145. FOR SALE—Registered Purebred Gelbvieh Bulls. Black, Red, Polled. Performance records. Good EPD's. Call (703) 783-6100, after 7:00 P.M. REAL NICE PUREBRED, YEARLING Belted Galloway bull. Excellent for first calf heifers. (804) 823-4388. OUTSTANDING, BIG, STRONG, performance tested Angus bull. 1-1/2 yr. old. Excellent maternal traits. $3500. (804) 823-4900. REGISTERED GRAY BRAHMAN BULL for sale. 11 months. Gentle. Diamond B Farm, Powhatan, VA. (804) 794-1209. REGISTERED, Fertility tested B B U Beefmaster Service age bulls. Vivian W. Evans, (703) 682-4457. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS— 4 sons of Tonto, Big Sky, Rito 888. (703) 228-8496 or (703) 228-2881. TENNESSEE WALKING HORSES, Registered or grade. Well broke for trail riding. (703) 382-0460. ARABIANS-Dispersal of quality herd. Terms. Welch pony pair....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1991

" ?t* V * v, \ " K v- -> _ . \"-A - K >•-■»- *. -" \* ' r ■:-' ~ ' , »£*t* \ - -,s . !;■• Vol. 50, No. 6 THE VOCE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS Septefrtjer/Octotoar 1991 — — I^IVI ...and you don't even have to be a farmer. Whether you need auto, home or life insurance, Tai • a > you can be sure your Farm Bureau Agent works ■ »! I I »1 y A l | « hard to get you the best coverage for your ■■MJPPHBipB money. That's why Americans from every walk of life, depend on Farm Bureau Insurance. Virginia farm bureau mutual insurance company EARLy SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY U . . v I SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY neipinS 70U IS SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY What We Do Best. 200 W. GRACE ST, RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1234 MMIIIi ' wp ||§M|iiillglllillllj3MljM ■> 1 '. "" -.i r* I*'?.. '~%~W 14;;1 f ■» >' ■ Bi m 4 B m % M> 1 H Willi I II I" » «r.. i Film gear and fodder ' Schoolchildren who may n...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

Farm Bureau Vol. 50, No. 9 A;' • '^ ,s t *? **W r j 4 mi |l - JB j^HH ■Bii/f M Joan Truesdale fastens Adam in the Cosco child seat that saved his life. (Photo by p.g. star****) Bay act, wetlands manual weighed in forum By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—"We could close all point sources of pollution and still have a polluted bay," said Russell W. Baxter. Baxter who is Virginia coordinator of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, gave background on the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act in an Oct. 3 forum called' 4 Down by the Bay... Whose Land is it Anyway?", sponsored by the First Unitarian Church of Richmond's social responsibility committee. He noted the commission's role is to advise and assist the legislatures of Viiginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania on shared bay issues. Enacted by the 1988 General Assembly, the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act was necessary, Baxter said, because the area "needed to come to grips with land use, development and agricultural practices th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

2 Seeds of understanding being sown through Ag in the Classroom Did you know that more than 60 kinds of fruits and vegetables are grown on Virginia's Eastern Shore? Were you aware that soybeans are used in cereals, soaps, paints, cosmetics and baby lotions? Or, did you have any idea that one bushel of wheat will produce approximately 73 loaves of bread? These are the kinds of exciting facts and figures contained in Virginia's Agriculture in the Classroom program for fourth grade elementary school students. Ag in the Classroom, sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, is a wonderful educational program which not only teaches our youth about farming, but informs their parents and teachers as well. The program is simple, yet fascinating. It takes basic agricultural material and presents it in a way where children learn not only about farm life and benefits consumers gain from the state's largest industry, but it combines these elements into challenging math problems, exciting ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 Mark your calendar Nov. 1-2: 4th Annual Virginia Wine Gala, sponsored by Virginia Tech. Educational seminars and tastings. Call 703-231-7577. Nov. 2: Virginia Angora Goat and Mohair Association meeting, East Quality Inn, Charlottesville. Contact Gail Scott, 703-348-5628. Nov. 3: First Thanksgiving celebration, Berkely Plantation. Charles City County. Call 804-272-3226. Nov. 3-6:45 th Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, White Sulfur Springs, W.Va. Contact Dr. Gerald Cross, Virginia Tech, 703-231-8844. Nov. 3-9: Virginia Natural Resources Conservation Week. Call VDACS' communications department, 804-786-2373- Nov. 6-7: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation annual resolutions conference, Natural Bridge. Contact Jonathan Shouse, 804-225-7696. Nov. 6: Commercial bred heifer sale, Dublin. Contact Ike Eller, Virginia Tech, 703-231-9151. Nov. 9: Shiitake mushroom growers conference, Albemarle County Office Building, Charlottesville. Call ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

4 Wild game provides healthful bounty for dinner table NewWellness m mm Thousands of families all over our state are bidding farewell to the hunters in their lives for what seems like the longest three months of the year. The transformation that takes place with a majority of men this time of year is amazing. The man who puts off mowing the lawn because of a bad back now leaps out of bed before dawn, spends hours crouched over in a blind, and thinks nothing of hauling a 200-pound deer for miles through the woods. Over the past seven years, I have, as a nutritionist, grown to accept this sudden seasonal behavior change because the end result, say a plump duck or an eightpoint buck, can actually be healthful additions to our normal diets. Research shows that most wild game is frequently much leaner than domestic varieties, making it a very nutritious main course. One reference book which has been invaluable in learning about the handling Wild Game Nutrition Chart (information based on...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 German settlers' roots traced in agricultural Madison MADISON —Hebron Luteran Church, built 251 years ago by German immigrants, was filled once again with German voices Sept. 2. On a tour arranged by the Women's Committee of the Madison County Farm Bureau, members of the Gerwerkschaft jAflfe jfe |AM German foresters, gardeners and landscapes touring Madison County broke into song in their language inside the historic Hebron Lutheran Church. FhmUy Homes fiiw-4814 171 Warrenton Rd., Fredericksburg The Mathews $101,850 Toll Free 1-400-468-7320 or 373-Z7ll Mail Coupon For Free Brochure VFBN-10 Name Street City State Zip I Own A Lot □ Yes □No Located Home Phone Work Phone American Family Homes fOv /\ jftp P.O. Box 266, Midlothian, VA 23113 & P.O. Box 5427, Fredericksburg, VA 22403 fcss gsSef a your dental bills more painful than having your tooth drilled? We can't do much about the pain in the dentist chair... but our new dental insurance plan will take away the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

6 Congressional aides meet the people laws touch J*i \ .jaiSSE'"- / Ar|r') ■--'Z^.9P •>* ... ■. ■'' '* *• WSf Looking at a cotton plant, from left are: an Eastern Shore reporter; Adam Anthony, aide to Sen. Charles Robb; John Keeling, assistant director of national affairs with the American Farm Bureau Federation; and farmer Phil Custis. (Photos by Kim Tutobs) HH Hf *4 \ l Larry Nyborg, manager of Heiean Chemical Co. shows the group a degradable chemical container that can be tossed into a spray tank without the chemical contacting the user's skin. Study looks at Horse Center's economic impact LEXINGTON—The Virginia Horse Center, established to serve and promote the state's horse industry, has become an important generator of income and jobs for Virginia and the Lexington-Rockbridge area, a new study shows. The economic impact study, undertaken for the Horse Center by the University of Virginia s Center for Public Service, shows that during fiscal year 1990-91, the Horse C...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 Ag commissioner and political expert speaking By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Clinton V. Turner and nationally known political author Dr. Larry Sabato will look to the future of agriculture and rural economics during the 66th Annual Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Convention at the Richmond Marriott. Turner will appear in the general session of Farm Bureau delegates, Wednesday, Dec. 4, shortly after its 8:45 a.m. opening. His topic will be "The Future of Agriculture—A Joint Venture." Sabato, professor of government and public affairs at the University of Virginia, is keynote speaker of Commodity Appreciation Day, Monday, Dec. 2. His address, "Virginia's Changing Political Climate and the Effects on Rural Areas," is part of the noon luncheon honoring growers of Virginia's commodities. Turner's remarks to the Farm Bureau will focus on results of the Commissioner's Forum on Agriculture at Lynchburg, CXt. 21...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

8 Commodity (Continued from Page 7) have not traditionally been agriculture related," he pointed out. The first session will feature Dr. Joseph Mastro, who will discuss the free enterprise system expected to develop in Eastern Europe and Russia. Mastro is professor of political science at North Carolina State University. He has a doctorate and master's degree in political science from Pennsylvania State University and a bachelor's degree from Ursinus College. Mastro also serves as director of humanities extension at N.C. State. In 1982, he was a visiting professor at Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan and visiting professor at Duke University in 1979. He has published four books on the Soviet Union with a fifth under way. He has also published 14 articles on Soviet politics and the Communist Party and is author of a public school text, "Living in the USSR." He has written and produced 29 videos on a variety of topics for the Public Broadcasting System and public schools. Also durin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 /Jk Bailey Five VFBF board members up for re-election By P.G. STANKEVICH Special to Farm Bureau News Elections for five seats on the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors will be held Dec. 5 at the VFBF Annual Convention in Richmond. Delegates will elect board members from Districts 2, 5, 8, 11 and 14. Each of the 14 district directors serve staggered three-year terms. At press time, the incumbents in these positions were running unopposed: District 2 Archie Bailey, District 2 director, represents Grayson, Smyth and Washington counties. Bailey was elected to the VFBF Board of Directors in 1978 after joining the VFBF in 1957. He has been Washington County president and vice president and serves on the VFBF Livestock, Audit and Budget committees and Ls chairman of the Burley Tobacco Committee. On the AFBF Sheep Committee, he has served four years and is chairman. Bailey has served on the Washington County Planning Commission, the Viiginia Agricultural Founda...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

10 Exhibit hall full of interesting information This year's convention exhibits offer a wide variety of information, a chance to ask questions as a consumer or producer and take a look at your health. Exhibit hours are: Monday, Dec. 2 from 10:30 a.m. to noon and 1:30 to 6 p.m.; I\iesday, Dec. 3 from 8 to 9 a.m., 10:30 to noon, and 2 to 5:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Dec. 4 from 10 to 1 p.m. Here are some of the exhibitors: United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Commerce Virginia Department of Forestry FMC Corp. Virginia Tech, education and agricultural technology USDA Soil Conservation Service Virginia Department of Agriculture, Division of Marketing Virginia Cooperative Extension Tobacco Growers Information Committee Inc. Virginia Soybean Association Homelite Textron NewWellness Health Programs Inc. health risk appraisals and screenings for cholesterol and blood pressure Food Specialties Virginia Affiliate of Prevent Blindness VFBF Young Farmers VFBF Women's Activities VFBF County ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 Virginia garlic rises to greatness By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor Garlic is something to celebrate in Virginia More than 5,000 people flocked to the first Virginia Garlic Festival Sept. 7-8. With interest, they visited the booths and stages amid lush grapevines at Richard and Ella Hanson's Rebec Vineyards in mountainous Amherst County. There's even a garlic queen, Shelley Peace of Halifax, who's pledged to be a working queen, appearing and promoting garlic at fairs and various events. For her tap dance routine in the Sept. 8 pageant, she made and wore a crown of garlic and a huge papiermache' garlic bulb, which she peeled off to reveal a sparkling black outfit and net stockings as roots. Her theme was: "If you like the outside, you're going to love the inside.'' The same can be said of elephant garlic, a relatively new crop for Virginia. Scientifically named Allium ampeloprasum, it is larger and milder in flavor and aroma than traditional garlic, Allium...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

12 Odle sees VFBF's success in teamwork and service By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor NICKLESVILLE —Dick Odle recalls when it took eight to 10 people to put up square bales of hay for winter feed. Now, one man can convert the same field into a golden carpet scattered with round bales. Yet, no farmer can stand alone, he acknowledges. On board In the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Odle sees that old-fashioned, everyone-pitch-in proeess at work to harvest a future for agriculture. "The strength of our organization lies in membership,'' said Odle, who has watched the state Farm Bureau grow from about 2(),()()(), when he joined in 1958 to 99,000, with 34,400 being producers. Today, Scott County, where Odle and his wife Velma live, has the largest number of producer members of Virginia's county Farm Bureaus. According to a summer report, 1,241 of a total 2,234 Scott members were producers. Most are small farmers, growing mainly tobacco. Scott County has 3,732 tobacco allotm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

November 1991 How can you save energy in today's kitchens? «T* 9P SHARING SECRETS with SHIRLEY faucet (if you do not have one) —because you use less water. • If you have a gas range, make sure the pilot light is burning efficiently (a blue flame instead of a yellow one) —because less gas is used when the pilot light burns with the proper ration of oxygen to gas. • Boil water in a lid covered pan—because the lid conserves heat which helps the water to boil faster. • Keep range top burners and reflectors clean —because more heat will be distributed to the pots and pans. • Match the size of the pan to the size of the ax)king element. This is a good management practice—because less heat will escape unused around the sides of the pan. • If you cook with electricity, turn off burners several minutes before the end of the allotted cooking time—because food will continue to cook with burners that remain hot long after being turned in an "off" position. • When using the oven, make the most o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1991

14 Seat (Continued from Page 1) meeting and press conference Sept. 23 at Manassas. Child seats are just as important to young riders as seat belts are to adults, she noted. "It was heartwarming to see the child and know he survived the crash," said Bruce Stone, safety coordinator and crop insurance manager for Farm Bureau. Stone called the accident violent after seeing pictures of the scene during the meeting. "It's comforting to know the seat worked well," he said. "These tested child seats are a safety feature parents want for their young passengers today. Plus, it's the law," said Wayne Ashworth, VFBF President. In Virginia, a child must be in a restraint seat until he is age 4 or weighs 40 pounds. A law enforcement officer does not have to have another reason to stop a driver to write a ticket for this violation. '' Not only does our seat lessen the risk of a serious injury in an auto accident, it is also an attractive seat. And it makes a wonderful gift." Ms. Truesdale agrees H...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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