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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Won the Russian V.C. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

Won the Russian V.C. The distinction of being the only Englishman serving as an officer in the Russian Army to win the St. George Cross for valor, the Russian V.C., belongs to Mr. Schack-Sommer, who was a mining engineer in Rus sia when the war broke out. Early in November he joined the 12th Art irsky Hussars, with which regiment he went through the Dukla Pass of the Carpathians into Hungary. Here he performed the deed which won for him Russia's greatest recognition of valor. His regiment had been storm ing the Austrian lines all day without reply, and it was decided to send scouts to find out if they were bluff ing. Mr. Schack-Sommer volunteer ed to go, and with eight others crept forward towards the.enemy, "trying," he says, "to look like tree-stumps. When about twenty yards from the lines, I heard voices and waited for some twenty minutes, and ascertained that several men were there. Then I saw two men, and they spotted me,, so I beat a hasty retreat. They fired twice, but either...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

III. It was dark at Fort Shiva, and the lights burned in the colonel's quar ters. They showed but dimly, for the panes of the windows were roughed to prevent hostile Pathans from lob bing IjOng-range bullets across the river and blowing out unsuspecting brains. The sentry at the main gate paced moodily up and down, think ing of many things. Then he check ed, and brought his rifle up. "Who goes there?" A form had flitted out of the shadows, and a na tive was standing there. * "No natives admitted after dark," said Trooper Scott. "Git out, nigger, jeldy." "I must see the colonel at once," said a clear English voice, and the soldier swore in amazement. The newcomer said something in a whis per, and the sentry, calling the ser geant of the quarter-guard, had the English-speaking native admitted at once. He went without hesitation to Colonel Lockhart's quarters, and was there admitted. "Well, ^hat is it?" The colonel's voice was stern. "I bring news, sir. The tribes are intending a rush ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM THE FIRING LINE. Lives Lost for a Comrade. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

FROM THE FIRING LINE. Lives Lost for a Comrade. "Can you hear me? I am Lance Corporal J. Ely, of the 1st Connaught Rangers. I am wounded in the- Ger man trench, i am dying for a drink." Eighty yards away in the British lines Private H. G. F. Mead, of the 4th Middlesex, heard the cry. "All right, mate," he shouted. "I'll get you out of that when it gets dark, and bring you a drink." "About six o'clock," says Ely, "when it was dusk, he came to me with a rush, and gave me water. He shouted for two volunteers to help to lift me, and two men of the same re giment came running to his help. They got me to within ten yards of the British trench, when the moon came oat and the Germans opened fire. Poor Mead and one of his com panions ware killed, but the third man escaped. An officer rushed out and dragged in the two bodies and myself, and told me that two good soldiers had lost their lives to save mine. All I could say was, 'Recom mend them for the V.C., sir.'"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE Exenville Standard. PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. J Printed and published by Lionel Sparrow, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

THK tflmtMILe .Stanirark - - — - - * I PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. J Printed and published by Lionel Sparrow, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Olydo street, Linton, in the State of Viotorla. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 1915. The greatest problem that faces the rulers of the British Empire to-day is how to bring to a speedy and successful issue the grim struggle in which she is iuvolved. The hard fact that after ten months of war, waged with unprecedented violence on both sides, Germany still re tains almost the whole of Belgium and a considerable tract of France, is beginning to aronse some serious thought in the minds of all who are not fatuously opti mistic. People are beginning to realise the tremendous power which 40 years of preparation has given to the German war machine; and no doubt the War Office realised it months ago. To avert public uneasiness, the whole truth has...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

Indian Motocycle; '© NEW 1915 MODELS. 4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, spring frame, free engine - - £56 31 h.p. Twins - - - - £61 7-h.p. Twins - - - £68 Nine Prominent Improvements on 1915 Models. Write to-day for Illustrated Catalog, for warded post free. MASSE! BICYCLE DEPOT, Sole District Agent, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat. Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. Commonwealth JSL Bank ofBustralia HEAD OFFICE SYDNEY This Bank is open for all classes of GENERAL. BANKING BUSINESS a* POST OFFICE BUILDINGS, Sturt & Lydiard Sts., BALLARAT Also at Melbourne, Sydney, Nevsrcastlo, Broken Hill, Dubbo, Canberra, Ade« ■aide, Porth, Hobart, Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville and London. 'Cable remittances made to, and drafts drawn on foreign places direct. Foreign bills negotiated and collected. Letters of credit issued to any part of the world. Bills negotiated or forwarded for collection. Banking and Exchange Business of every description transacted within the Common wealth, United Kingdom and abroad...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOCAL AND GENERAL. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

LOCAL AND GENERAL. The past week has been productive of a good rainfall for Victoria, and our dis trict has had a good share of the bounte ous downpour. Rain began to fall early on Tuesday morning, continuing steadily till midday, when very cold wintry con ditions prevailed, the wind being very keen. Since then a good deal of lignt rain has occurred, and the registration up to Friday morning is 211 points. In the month of August the Method ists of Australia are arranging a series of great demonstrations in the various capitals. Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart, Adelaide, and Brisbane will all be cen tres for Methodist organised enthusiasm and liberality over their first 100 years in Australia. It is also proposed to have demonstrations in the big provin cial centres. The following district sales of stock are reported :—52 crossbred wethers for Mr Geo. Wills, Carranballac, £1 5s Id to £1 3s 8d, averaging £1 10s Id ; for Mr L. Greenbank, Snake Valley— 36 comeback ewes, £1 3s lid to 18s 3d ; ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

For children's hacking; cough at night, Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, Is 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

NURSES of Large Experience Recommend CLEMENTS TOHIC fc@ th®Br Patl©nt@a NURSE CATHERINE KORTING of 176 Davit Street, Brunswick, Vic., write* as follow* (29/2/12): CLEMENTS TONIC LTD. te I am writing about the afflonnt of good CLEMENTS TONIC has done my daugh ter. In Janoary last year, she was operated upon for appendicitis. She was eight weeks in the hospital, and came home very weak and ran dows. I gave her several bottles ©f Clements Tonic. ■> It goes strengthened her serves, she was as well as 1 could wish her before long. Fourteen years ago I first osed this medicine as a nurse and have recommended it times oat of number. I have seen people restored to health and strength, and bless the day they heard of it. It never failed to do good. (8lcnad) O; CATHERINE KORTING/® Never be without this medicine if run down, with Weak Nerves. Bad Digestion, Poor Appetite or Constipation, It puts the human system in order rapidly ALL CHEMISTS & STORES SELL IT. m JOHN SNOW &lt...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KITCHENER AND THE SPIES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

KITCHENER AND THE SPIES. Lord Kitchener's thoroughness is proverbial, but it was seldom better exemplified than on one occasion during his Khartoum Expedition. One evening as his lordship's for ces were nearing Khartoum, a Der vish spy was discovered in camp and J promptly taken to headquarters. But I no amount of threatening or bribing would induce the spy to speak. He pretended to be both deaf and dumb. Scarcely was his examination over when another spy was led in, and proved to be equally stubborn. They were bound and led away and placed in a well-guarded tent. About half-an-hour afterwards there was a fresh stir and hubbub, and a third spy was dragged in, who also would reveal nothing, so he too was placed with the others. Soon the soldiers on guard outside were much surprised to hear the "dumb" spies talking eagerly togeth er in an undertone. It was impossible to hear what they said, but they jab bered away for an hour or more. At ' last the third spy appeared at the en trance ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
If the War Stopped To-day. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

One of the leading British journals says that if the war stopped to-day his tory would record a signal German vic tory and a decisive British defeat. This statement is ronndly challenged by Dr. Fitchett, the editor of *J Life," in the June issue of that excelleut Aus tralasian magazine. In bis most graphic style, and with that keeness of insight which characterises his writings on the war he points out the exact re verse to be the case. " Great Britain," Dr Fitchett writes, " has suffered no defeat; the foot of the invader has not touched her soil. Her command of the sea is absolute. She has created in a few brief months an army of Continental scale and of at least Continental quality. But, on the other band, what a catalogue of failures makes up the story of Germany. Her whole plan of the war has been wrecked. The ' march to Paris' failed ; the swing eastward of victorious armies, which was to overwhelm Russia, has not taken place. Germany has tried to reach Paris, and failed ; to ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVII. "Mr. Johnson." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

CHAPTER XVil. "Mr. Johnson." Inspector Shrewton had left Tem ple Westford and returned to town where he was wanted, he gave out, to take charge of an important coin ing case, and in his place there ar rived another detective officer named Johnson, a dark, lithe-figured man with abnormally sharp eyes and a smartly courteous manner, who some how gave one the idea of being more highly cultured than the ordinary man of his calling. Rolt and he were examining the brougham in the stable-yard when George and Derman Conway saunter ed up and greeted them. Rolt pre sented his new colleague. "I heard Inspector Shrewton had been called away on another case," George observed casually. "I hope, though, his departure does not signi fy that there is not much hope of get ting to the bottom of the mystery." Rolt and his assistant smiled, and it would have been hard to gauge ex actly what their smiles conveyed—or hid. "It is too early yet to speak with much certainty as to our chances, Mr. Conway," Ro...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE RUSSIAN LEGEND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

? THE RUSSIAN LEGEND. The editor's reminiscences of the famous legend of the Russians go far to explain why the canard "caught on" so amazingly. "For "we "were," he says, "just then desperately anx ious about the safety of our great little army, driven struggling upon the forts of Paris. The landing of 60,000 Russians at Ostend seemed just the diversion which strategical justice demanded, and we believed what we desperately wished to be lieve. Again and again I thought I had confirmation of the great Rus sian legend. The railways encour aged it, the censorship encouraged it, True or untrue, we wanted the Ger mans to believe it. Perhaps soice day, when the inner history of this war comes to be written, we shall know what part the Russian legend played in the swerve of Yon Kluck from the very outskirts of Paris, which was the turning-point of the western campaign." Doctor: The increasing deafness of your wife is merely an indication of advancing years, and you can tell her that. Husba...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEWSPAPERS AND THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

NEWSPAPERS AND THE WAR. "A Newspaper in Time of War" is the title of a very readable article by "An Editor" in the March "Cornhill," which sets forth how the world-wide struggle in its earlier phases was re garded from the Fleet-street point of view. The writer, in deciding to share in the expenses of sending 16 war correspondents to France and Belgium, predicted—accurately enough, as it turned out—that it was stories they would get, not news. So long as Belgium was unconquered the 16 war correspondents had freedom ' to come and go, and even to telegraph. Up to the fall of Ant werp he received daily many stories. "My 16 gallant ones," continued the editor, "chivied from village to vil lage in Belgium, and, coldly frowned upon by authority in France, kept up their supply of stories with dauntless courage and persistence. Until—as happened a little later—most of them were deported from France as an un bearable nuisance, they kept up the I appearance, if not quite the reality, of exhau...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVI. Rolt Learns Something. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

CHAPTER XVI. Rolt Learns Something. Next morning Rolt, who had taken up his quarters at the "White Lion" in the village, having overnight spent some hours in quiet cogitation over the problem presented by the mys terious tragedy, called at Constable Palmer's house and found that wor thy official at home. "I have come to ask you a few questions, Palmer, about this case," he announced. "At your service, Mr. Rolt. Please step in," Palmer responded with def erential importance. "I suppose you received informa tion of the Countess Mornay'e mys terious disappearance on the Satur day evening r" Rolt began. "I should say it would be about 8.30 p.m. that I heard of it," Palmer answered in his witaess-box style. "Who brought you the news?" "Mr..-' Murrell, the butler at the Manor House." "And a search was put on foot at once?" "Yes, sir. I understood that all the men employed at the Manor House were sent o.ut in different directions." "By whom?" "By Mr. Conway, I presume, sir. Mr. George Conw...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cloak of Darkness CHAPTER XV. A Dubious Interview. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 12 June 1915

By SIR WILLIAM MAGNAY, Author of "The Long Hand," "Paul Burden," "The Unknown Fourth," etc. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XV. A Dubious Interview. "Malva Zarnow." George Conway stayed looking doubtfully at the card, trying to re call the name, and finally concluding that, so far as his recollection went, it was unknown to him. He was not, however, a man to waste time in fu tile speculation; a sight of his visitor would quickly settle the question, and, accordingly, he went without further hesitation to the library. The lady, who was sitting near to the fire, rose at his entrance. As they exchanged bows he looked at her curiously. Somehow, it was scarcely what he had expected to find. A short, thick-set woman, with a strong face, interesting in its suggestion of character, but by no means hand some. The dark eyes behind the pince-nez glasses seemed severely alert. Indeed, her whole personality indicated strength and energy. A lady almost, and a foreigner quite, beyond doubt. Her dark ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NO MORE FAT PEOPLE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 19 June 1915

NO * FAT PEOPlt Most fat people soem to think- that the only way to take off fat is to use dangerous drags, follow a starvation diet or take strenuous excercise. But all this is nonsense, and, thanks to the recent discovery of an eminent scientist, thousands of men and women are taking off several pounds of useless fat a week, by simply robbing on to the fat part—■ hips, arm, chin, or abdomen—a simple lotion made by pouring a cup of hot water over a dram of quassia chips ; let it stand for a minute, then-strain through a cloth and add 8 ounces ofcCirola Bark Extract. Pour the mixture into a bottle and apply night and morning, rubbing it in with the hands for about 10 minutes, using a circular motion, and the fat will almost seem to melt away before your very eyes. The ingredients, which are inexpensive, may be had of1 any chemist, and the results to be ob tained are really remarkable.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 19 June 1915

Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, For coaghB and colds never fails,-Is 6d

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STOCK FARD HILL DISTRICT CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 19 June 1915

STOCK FARD HILL DISTRICT CLUB. The above club's first meeting this , season was held in aid of the Belgian Belief Fund, near Skipton, on Thursday, when a 16 a.a. stake at £1 Is each, with £4 added by the club was run. Hares were plentiful, though wild and exceptionally strong, gruelling courses being the order of the day. The veteran, Mr J. Gaple, acted as judge, and Mr W. Halpin as slipper, both giving unbounded satisfaction. The stake (£12) was won by Messrs Harris and Elder's Glen Dhu; Mr P. Gange's Oredia being runner-up, and tak ing £5 ; whilst Mr P. Ferguson's Birdinia and Mr N. Gange's Yalla-y-Poora Belle re ceived £1 Is each. Details are appended First round—N. Gange's Oredia beat Harris and Elder's George Edmonds ; P. Ferguson's Freedom Joy beat Harris and Elder's IiC.U.; N. Gange's Yalla-y-Poora Belle beat A. M'lntyre's Ruby Alma ; Harris and Elder's Drama beat A. M'Intyre's Miss A.M.; P. Eerguson's Birdinia beat J. Liddle's Dashma datia ; Harris and Elder's Praleen beat. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Coursing CAPE CLEAR AND PITFIELD CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 19 June 1915

CAPE CLEAR AND P1TFIELD CLUB. The first meeting of the Cape Clear and Pitfield Coursing Club opened aus piciously on Saturday last. Although the day broke showery it did not deter a large number making the trip from all parts of the district to the Haringhal Estate, where the coursing took place. The first pair of dogs was in the hands of the slipper (Mr W. Kennedy) in good time, and he got the dogs off in every race without a hitch. Hares were plentiful and were very strong, and be fore lunch hour there ouly remained the final courses to run off. This was due to some extent to the absence of Mr J. O'Donnell's dogs, Stoney King and Empire May to take part in the first round, the owner having had au acci dent to the motor-car conveying the dogs to the ground. The judge (Mr C. Wilding), as usual, gave every satisfac tion. The president (Mr W. T. Rowe) assisted materially to make the meeting a success, and the secretary (Mr T. Hayden) worked indefatigably in the interests of all concer...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LOST VIOLETS. A Little Tragedy of the War. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 19 June 1915

THE LOST VIOLETS. A Little Tragedy of the War. They were travelling Victoria-ward —he a big, hulking fellow in khaki, bayo-net on thigh, rifle in hand; at his side a little woman, plainly dress ed, and some five or six years younger than her husband. The khaki man seemed absent-minded and gloomy, and at intervals he looked wistfully at his wife, as if considering the pos sibility of never again seeng her pretty face. But the woman was all gaiety—or affected to be. She had a penny bunch of violets in her bo som, and every little while took it out, raised it to her lips, and then to the soldier's, who dutifully kissed the blooms, giving the little woman a kindly smile. And she prattled on of father, mother and uncle, and "Susie" and "Letty," and "Lady and the Duchess of and of the good times she would have "at home," and of the warm things she would make for him, making "sister" and all her friends help. He listened indulgently, for in his heart of hearts he under stood that she did n...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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