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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COSTLY TOYS. FOR GROWN-UP CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

COSTLY TOYS.   FOR GROWN-UP CHILDREN. There are many persons who never outlive   their love for toys in some form. The largest   and most elaborate toy in the world is in the   possession of a wealthy Baltimore man. It is   nothing more or less than an automatic land-   scape—a large sweep of country villages,   churches, windmills, lakes, rivers, and all the   details of country scenery.   When this mammoth toy is put in motion,   boats dart here and there across the lake, pulled   by lusty rowers, carts lumber along the roads,   the miller mounts a ladder carrying sacks of   grain on his back, church bells ring, and children   play in the village streets; a large Ferris wheel   turns slowly round with its burden of aerial pas-   sengers, and trains shriek into tunnels and over...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A QUAINT PETITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

    A QUAINT PETITION.   On February 11th, 1763, a petition was presen-   ted to the King from the master peruke-makers,   setting forth "the distress of themselves and   numbers of others dependant upon them from the   almost universal decline of the trade, occasioned   by the present mode of men of all stations wear-   ing their own hair," and praying the King to   "so condescend as to afford them proper means of relief." His Majesty, we are told, was gra-   ciously pleased to receive the petition, and re-   turned as answer that "the petitioners may be   assured he should at all times use his endeavor   to promote their welfare."   That there were humorists even in those days   is evident from the fact that the Company of   Body Carpenters presented a second peti...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LARGEST COINS IN CIRCULATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE LARGEST COINS IN CIRCULATION. The largest gold coin now in circulation is the gold ingot, or "loof," of Anam, a French colony in Eastern Africa. It is a flat round gold piece, and on it is written in Indian ink its value, which is about £65. The next-sized coin to this valuable, but extremely awkward one is the "obang" of Japan, which is worth about £10; and next comes the "benda" of Ashantee, which represents a value of about £9. The Californian fifty-dollar gold piece is worth about the same as the "benda." The heaviest silver coin in the world also belongs to Anam, where the silver in- got is worth about £3; then comes the Chinese "tael," equal to about seven shillings, and then the Austrian double thaler.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIS PRINCIPAL FUNCTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

HIS PRINCIPAL FUNCTION. Towne: "There's nothing like a friend in ad-   versity."   Browne: "That's right. He's in a class all by   himself. He can tell you at least a score of rea-   sons why you failed."   —Philadelphia "Press"  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CANCER "CURE." PECULIARITIES OF THE DISEASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE CANCER "CURE." PECULIARITIES OF THE DISEASE. According to the "British Medical Journal," there is no proof that the long-sought specific for cancer has been found in the modest violet. Ra- tional medicine in the domain of therapeutics tries all things, and holds fast to that which it finds good, and the medical profession would be only too glad to learn, from any source, of a cure for the dread disease which, even in these days, too often mocks our art. But proof is necessary, and that is just what is wanting in the case to which such unfortunate publicity has been given. EXPERIENCE IS FALLACIOUS. To the lay mind doubtless the facts, the sub- stantial accuracy of which we have no reason to dispute, are in themselves convincing. It is sufficient for it that there was a tumor, which vanished "almost like a miracle" on the applica- tion of an infusion of violet leaves. It does not know how fallacious is experience, how difficult is judgment. It is, we understand, true that a portio...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FASHIONABLE FUNERAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A FASHIONABLE FUNERAL. It is a custom in Urua, Central Africa, at the burial of a chief, to divert the course of a stream and to dig an enormous pit in its bed. This cavern is then lined with living women. At one   end a woman is placed on her hands and knees,   and upon her back the corpse of the dead chief,   covered with beads and other ornaments, is seated, being supported on either side by one of his wives, while his second wife sits at his feet. The earth is then shovelled in over living and dead alike, all the women being buried alive except the second wife, who is graciously per- mitted the privilege of being slaughtered before the huge grave is closed in. Finally 40 or 50 slaves are killed, and their blood poured over the sepulchre, after which the stream is allowed to resume its course.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AGAINST BLINKERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

AGAINST BLINKERS. The president of the Berlin Society for the Pre- vention of Cruelty to Animals has issued a pro- clamation to the public urging them, when en- gaging cabs, to take only those whose drivers do not follow the stupid and cruel custom of using blinkers over the eyes of the horses, which, he says, are the principal cause of shying.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ASTHMA IN THE NOSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

    ASTHMA IN THE NOSE.           There has been, and is, great dispute as to the definition of asthma, and many nasal specialists consider asthma to be a purely secondary condi- tion resulting from some diseased change in the mucous membrane of the nose. It is, says the "Lancet," an undoubted fact that by treating the nose alone a large number of cases of asth- ma may be improved and a few may be cured. The probability of a case of asthma being de- pendent upon nasal trouble is increased if any definite sensitive area, or "cough spots," can be discovered in the nose, or if, as is not very uncommon, the asthmatic attack is preceded or accompanied by the sudden onset of such symptoms as sneezing, nasal obstruction, and   catarrh.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW MEDICAL DISCOVERY. TRACTION OP THE TONGUE FOR RESTORING CONSCIOUSNESS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

NEW MEDICAL DISCOVERY.     TRACTION OF THE TONGUE FOR   RESTORING CONSCIOUSNESS.   One of the methods by which France is at-   tempting to cope with the grave question of   depopulation is to reduce the infant mortality   statistics. Dr. Laborde, of the Academy of   Medicine, has devoted much study to this subject,   and the other day, at the weekly meeting of the   academy, he made a very interesting communica-   tion regarding two cases in which the method   of rhythmical traction, of which he is the dis-   coverer, had been employed with signal suc-   cess.     In the first case the child when born was livid,     and apparently dead, Dr. Matignon, of Bordeaux,   however, after applying rhythmical traction to   the tongue for...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRAYERS—2s. PER HOUR! [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PRAYERS—2s. PER HOUR!     The latest fashionable form of quackery in Berlin is prayer healing. This has for some time prevailed in aristocratic circles in Berlin and Potsdam, and it has also invaded the ranks of the financial aristocracy. A pharmacopoeia of prayers to be used against special forms of dis- ease has been prepared, the "British Medical   Journal" tells us. However beneficial to pa-   tients this new method of spiritual therapeutics   may be, it does not appear to be likely to enrich   its professors beyond the dreams of avarice.   But, then, German professional fees are usually   low. The practitioner of prayer healing most in   vogue is a lady doctor whose fees are at the rate   of two shillings an hour.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A VACUUM ARC LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A VACUUM ARC LIGHT.   Instead of using carbons that must be fre-   quently replaced, the new carbonless arc lamp   described by a French journal has two L-shaped   alluminium arms with platinum points, which   are kept by clockwork at the proper distance   apart. It is stated that these aluminium arms   need replacing only once a year, being used in   an exhausted glass globe.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Did You Know This? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Did You Know This? The Egyptian Budget for 1902 shows a surplus of £215,000. The death is reported from Genoa of the Arch- bishop, Mgr. Reggio, who was born in 1818. The first fire engine used in America was taken from England to New York in 1731. It is a remarkable fact that few savages have ever been known to stammer. Madame Sarahi Bernhardt's mother was Dutch, and her father a French lawyer. One in 50 of persons over 80 years old is blind. England and Wales have 62 towns of over 50,000 people. Shetland's shortest night is five hours; but her longest is over 18 hours. The first shell was used in warfare by the Sultan of Gujerat, India, in 1480. No less than 1132 different species of seaweeds are found on Australian coasts. Rubbing the base of the finger-nails with lemon-juice will prevent the skin growing over. Those with a tendency to cracked lips should add vinegar to the water in which they wash. It is proposed at Coventry to erect a monument in memory of the late Mr. J. K. Sta...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LONDON'S YOUNGEST EDITOR. MR. HALL CAINE'S SON IN CHARLES DICKENS' CHAIR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

LONDON'S YOUNGEST EDITOR.   MR. HALL CAINE'S SON IN CHARLES DICKENS' CHAIR. Mr. Ralph Hall Caine, the son of the famous novelist, who is barely seventeen and a half years old, is editing "Household Words," the weekly paper founded and for some time edited by Charles Dickens. Mr. Hall Caine does not look a day more than   his age. He was till a few months ago at King William's College, in the Isle of Man, and his father intended that he should go on to Oxford, and afterwards enter the diplomatic service. Neither classics nor diplomacy, however, had any attractions for him. He had watched his father correcting proofs, and had been in the newspaper offices with which his uncle has been connected, and he determined that, whatever his work was, it must be concerned with the trade of the writer. To some extent against his father's will, he left school, and came to London for a visit, and after a week or two wrote home to Greeba Castle saying that "Household Words...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENGLAND. 1901-1902. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ENGLAND. 1901-1902. Lift up thine eyes, Queen Warrior of the World! Stand, fearless-footed on Time's shifting verge, And watch thy New Year's doubtful dawn emerge From parting clouds thick-roll'd in thunderous war! Lo, how thy broad East reddens to thy West, The while thy thousand-victoried flag, unfurl'd, Waves to thy North and South in one royal fold Of tent-like shelter for an Empire's rest; O Queen, sword-girded, helmeted in gold, Strong conqueror of all thy many foes, Look from thy rocky heights, and see, afar, The coming Future menacing the Past, With clamor and wild change of present things,   Kingdoms down-shaken with the fall of kings,— But fear not thou! Thou'rt still the first and last Imperial wearer of the Deathless Rose;— Crown'd with the sunlight, girded with the sea. Mother of mightiest Nations yet to be! —Marie Corelli, in "Christmas Greeting."     Printed and Published by WATKIN WYNNE, of Bon   Accord-avenue, Wave...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Books Worth Reading. OR TALKED ABOUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Books Worth Reading. OR TALKED ABOUT. The mail steamer which arrived in Sydney last Saturday brought a fair parcel of new books which are now obtainable in the main Australian cities and towns. Perhaps the most interesting is Chevalier's charming: autobiography. "Before I Forget," a work from which some extracts were given in "The World's News" last week. These show the character of the book, and it is unnecessary to give it any more praise. Marie Corelli's "Christmas Greeting" is sure to command a great deal of attention because of the authoress. That is the only reason why it should command attention. In other respects it is a jumble of curious poetry and literary scraps, with here and there a dainty morsel well worth dwelling over. However, readers are sure to judge for themselves. Among other books which Dymock's display as the very latest, and copies of which have been placed at the writer's disposal, are Edwin Lester Arnold's "Lepidus, the Centurion," "Captain Bluitt," by Max ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Proposed M'Kinley Memorial at Washington. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

The Proposed M'Kinley Memorial at Washington.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

TEAS, BUT ONLY PURE TEAS, OP EVERY GRADE, QUALITY, and PRICE procurable, Whether they be THE NECESSARIES 0E THE POOREST or the LUXURIES OE THE RICH, are Supplied by AT THE LOWEST RATES OBTAINING. When and see that Purchasing "SIGNAL." the from k PRICE Retailers, marked on please look 1 the Packet for our ii has not been TRADE jl tampered MARK, with. Griffiths Brothers, fob, teas, coffees, and cocoas, 534 GEORGE-STREET (OPPOSITE TOWN-HALL, SYDNEY.)!

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "SEA SICKNESS" OF SEA BIRDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

THE "SEA SICKNESS" OF SEA BIBDS. » Dr. T. Archibald Dukes writes to the "British Medical Journal" in reference to the fact that sea birds when caught and brought on deck often vomit. The huge albatross need not be accused 1 of "the habit of disgorging to more powerful adversaries." It is caught with a hook and ' dragged over the surface of the water to the 1 ship. During the process it involuntarily swal- ' lows much "sea water, which soon produces vomit- i ing. If the bird can manage to keep its head < above water all the while. Dr. Dukes has noticed, < it is not sick. But on the principle that "like < cures like" a tumbler of sea water is an old sea- , man's cure for sea sickness; and undoubtedly ( when a patient can summon sufficient resolution ( to drink half a pint he soon overcomes his ( trouble.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HONEY AS A PERFECT FOOD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

HONEY AS A PERFECT FOOD. j ) Few people know that honey possesses great ' value as a food on account of its ease of diges- ( tion; for which reason it is especially desir- ( ) able for those with weakened digestive powers. ( > The nectar of flowers is almost entirely cane ) > sugar. The secretions added by the bees change ) ) this to grape sugar, and so prepare it that it is ) ) almost ready for assimilation without any effort s ) on the part of the stomach. The unpleasant \ ) symptoms from which some suffer after a sur- ( ) feit of honey may often be removed by drinking I } a little milk. And yet so valuable a food as ( > honey is often adulterated with glucose. /

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW PENCIL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 18 January 1902

j A NEW PENCIL. The "turn lead" pencil is a lead pencil on a new plan. The strip of lead is made like a screw thread while soft, and theft hardened by a special pro cess; this fits into a holder with a nickel point and a felt wad, the latter keeping the lead rigid while writing, and also preventing breakage through a fall. A slight turn brings the lead forward when the end is worn cloee to the point. It is always sharp and ready for use. It is claimed that the screw thread formation odds additional strength,

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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