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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Te Indian ulVocaie Is a Quarterly Review, published h the Ilcnedlctino Fathers of the Indian Ter , to pk nd the cause of the Inst remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilisation. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe, their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc , etc. Alo, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other Interesting matter that can not bo found in an other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the 'lerrltorj. llli: INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart I'. 0 , Okla. Tor. AliROVHi) HY Khjiit Hl THFO. Mr.hRfeCHAKRT, VlCK AtOSTOttC 01 OKI UtOMA IM) I.MUVN TH'ltlTOU. A Quarter!), Review, entortd at the Sicred Heart I'ost Oihco in Oklahomi lorntorj, as second clls matter. Sultic) ipltom 60 Ccnti per Year. Stnylc Copicx 15 Cents. OCTOBER, 1809. Truth is moral dynamite. Only the ignorant ma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

106 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. J . V Hypocrisy is the gift of virtue used in the adornment of vice. About 7,000 Oherokees, 15,000 Creeks, 6,000 Choctaws, 4,000 Chicka saws and 1,S00 Seminoles have signed an agreement to go to Mexico. W. T. Lyon, Mexican agent. Sunday, August 27th, the Catholic school at Gorman, O. T., was solemnly blessed by Mgr. Meerschaert, assisted by many priests. May God's blessing rest upon it forever. Last year Rev. Isidore Ricklin, C. S. B., the Apostle of the Commanches, Kiowas, Apaches, etc., bought the pub lic school at Chickasha, Ind. Ter., one of his' neighboring missions. This year he secured five Franciscan Sisters of Philadelphia, who teach 125 pupils, mostl7 Protestants. That's business. Cardinal Vaughan had made arrange ments with the Benedictines of the Monastery of Solesmes, in the north of France, to chant the Holy Office in his Cathedral. This arrangement has called forth so many violent protests that it has been broken off. The En glish Benedictines...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 107 The Sacred Heart school at El Reno was dedicated Sunday, September 4th, with impressive ceremonies, by the Right Reverend Bishop Meerschaert, who made a special visitation to El Reno for that purpose. He was assist ed by Father Leo, of Sacred Heart Mis sion; Father Isador, of Anadarko; Father VanHufne, of Yukon; Father Constantine, 0. S. B., and Brother Romanus, 0. S. B.,of El Reno. High Mass was celebrated by Father Leo, at 11 o'clock, with a solemn blessing from the bishop. The bishop's sermon was a most eloquent effort, and his remarks regarding the school, its mission and high aspirations, were listened to with the utmost attention. At 5 o'clock the special dedication services took place, being conducted by the bishop, assisted by Fathers Isador, Constantine and VanHulIle. The pro cession formed at the church and pro ceeded to the school building, where the ceremony of blessing the institution in its entirety and the rooms separately took place. These se...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

108 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I Wm. Ospital, ofPurcell, I. T.; D. Elias Funk, of Anadarko, 0. T. The community all unite in wishing their Rev. confreres years of successful work in the ministry and beg their prayers at holy Mass that their courage ma' not fail in making for that high goal which they have now so happily reached. The Osage reservation comprises 1,800,000 acres of as fine farming and grazing land as can be found anywhere, and is owned by the best Indian tribe in the country. They are the richest people, per capita, in the world. They number about 1,800 and are of the kind known as blanket Indians. They have $10,000,000 on deposit with the gov ernment and they annually receive interest to the amount of $400,000. The money is part of the price Uncle Sam paid for the Osage lands in Kan sas. When that deal was consumated they were to receive $1.25 for every acre ceded. As the lands were sold the money was placed to their credit. They purchased the 1,800,000 acres they now own f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 109 The Attitude of the Government Toward Catholic Indian Schools. IT IS MOST UNJUST AND UNWISE A STIRRING APPEAL BY BISHOP BRONDEL, OF MONTANA SEE QUOTATIONS FROM THE OFFICIAL RE PORTS OF THE GOVERNMENT. Bishop Brondol, of the Diocese of Helena, Montana, has issued a circular containing facts and figures which de monstrated the unwisdom and cruel injustice of the government's policy in the matter of Indian schools. The Bishop quotes from the official reports to show that where Catholic contract schools have been closed by reason of the withdrawal of Government support there has been no adequate substitute, and the nation's wards are practically deprived of every facility for mental or moral betterment and left to drift back into a state of barbarism and savagery. The circular is as follows: Helena, Montana, July 12, 1S99. To Whom it May Concern: I herewith submit to the considera tion of the general public the official reports of the six Indian agents of Montan...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

4!JW"ITT!''"PP i-v-TTvni I ) 110 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1898, page 182, we read : RLACKFOOT INDIAN AGENCY. Page 183, Education. There are con ducted on this reservation two schools the government boarding school, on Willow Creek, with an attendance of 103, and the Holy Family Mission, on the Two Medicine River, with an at tendance of 45. The number of chil dren of school age between 6 and 16 is 421. At the Holy Family Mission School the building occupied by the Sisters and girls was destroyed by fire last February. A new building is under process of construction, which, when completed, will render the school thoroughly complete, where undoubted ly the past excellent work of the Holy Family Mission among the Indians will be continued. CROW AGENCY. Page 188, Education. The highest number in school attendance during the year was 23S pupils. Of these 159 attended the Government School at the agency and 80 the Catholic Mission Shools at the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

w -i -- -WF U I" V. THE INDIAN ADVQOATJD. ill f m the Indian children in that locality. Soveral improvements have been made at this institution during the year and the general appearance of the plant is attractive and prosperous. Missions. The missionary work of the reservation is carried on by the Society of Jesuits of the Roman Catho lic Church. These people are faithful and diligent workers, and are doing much good among the Indians. A new church building is being constructed by the society at their mission, which will bo of great assistance to them in their work. FORT PECK AGENCY. Page 196. School children, 075. Attendance, 183. Religion. The Presbyterian and Roman Catholic Churches maintain missionaries. Both are doing a good work among the Indians. Considerable progress has been made in the past few yoars. It is not so patent to one being here continuously, but to me, after an absence of five years, it is very evident. TONGUE 111 V Kit AGENCY Page 198. I sincerely trust that s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

wffy"w-s-'-1 " ! " i""mhi 112 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ac v" 'j arise among His chosen both to prove tneir naenty ana to tost the interest wo take in helping Him. Then what a reward both temporal and spirituall Those young men finally succeed; they receive their mission and begin the great work for souls. Is ' it 'not consoling to think that with a few little sacrifices in this life wo have succeeded in giving a comforter to the the dying, a refuge to the penitent and a renewer of the sacrifice on Cal vary, who would it it were not tor our '?! t assistance, perhaps have lost his voca tion? As he goes about his daily duties and especially at the Holy Sacri fice will ho not remember us, and after we have departed from this life, could he neglect to send to Heaven's court many a supplication for us, where wo might otherwise be forgotten. Therefore it ought to be our pride and ambition to give our assistance to those whose heart's aspire the lofty dignity of Melchosadek, who says:. "Tu est ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

srrsr S! pnn . v ' AC ' '-in m TPIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. There wore also two hundred Algon- i' quins who formerly resided on the '.rivers and jilnnnr fho nnrf.hnrn p.nnsf. nf wike Huron, but who had hero sought Wgo. CT h o enumeration of tribes by Pere Druillettes continues, placing the Maikotin out on the prairie, distant three days journey by water, and vari V. southward tribes are enumerated i.fith extravagant population, for in- ik nee, the Aliniouek (Illinois) were Lnid tonumber twenty thousand men or Uie vicinity of one hundred thousand h. o Noukek of this record were foubt identical with the Nouquet or fguette who lived on the extremity ;h of Green Bay, on what to-day is gnatcd the Bay of Noquct. Under name also wore the Menomini rred to in some old accounts, but '-''he at present existing preserves lignation, the absorption of the Jinto some other body being k the cause of the disappearance Ame. l('ox Indians occupied the valley river in 1714 when a French Jon under de Louvigny ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

'rfxy' mmmmm m " i H ' i ' wK 114 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, i - 111 ' r -wfg' i' force of seventeen men of the Sixtieth (or Royal American) Regiment in com mand of Lieutenant Gorrell. This party arrived at Green Bay on October 12 at a time of the year when it was custom ary for the Indians to be off on their annual hunting expedition; so that there was but one family remaining at the post. Lieutenant Gorrell states that he had found in his orders very little regarding the Indians, so that when leaving, he applied to Captain Donald Campbell, at Detroit, for fur ther instructions; the latter referred him to Sir William Johnson, then present, who told him orally, that unless he did his best to please the Indians, he had better not go there. On account of the absence of the Indians, no council was held with the tribes until May 23, 1762; at this time the chiefs of the Menomini and Winne bago were there, and received strings of wampum in return for prisoners. According to Gorrell's journal, t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

wmjt' ' m', wi"w" -v ; PWJI 1(11 I IIIHWJP 'V JW" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 115 I 1 silyor medal by tho British authorities with a certificate of his chieftainship and good services." When in 1764, Sir William Johnson sent messengers to tho various tribes of the Groat Lakes, calling them to a council to bo held at Niagara for the purpose of urging them to remain friendly to tho English, a delegation of four hundred and ninety-nine Me nomini went from Green Bay confident of deserving recognition for their ser vices to Gorrell and his band of soldiers. They were received with cordiality and greeted as brothers; and on the ad journment of the council they departed woll pleased with their experience. I The English did not again occupy tho post on Green Bay, and the Menomini did not render service to them until at tho outbreak of the Revolution when a party under Charles do Langlade, with another Indian force went to Montreal and there held a council. About 1780 Captain Dalton, superintendent...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

Tpw '-Tpgafagp-L-35 -" - i- J 1 Hi II I I I ri f 116 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. omini together with the Ottawa, "Wini bago, Pottowatomi and other north western tribes rendered conspicuous service in the defeat of Braddock in 1755 at Fort Duquesne, where they were led and commanded bjr Sieur Charles de Langlade. They also par ticipated in the battles before Quebec on the plains of Abraham. Glode (son of Old Carron), Osauwishkeno (the yellow bird), Kachakawasheka (the notch maker) and the elder Carron were present at the fall of Mont calm. . On June 7, 1726, peace was effected between M. do Lignoy and the chiefs of the Fox, Sauk and Winnebago tribes Pauns a la Bate; and to make this peace certain and stable, it was thought proper to grant to the chief of the first named tribe his request that a French officer be stationed in that country to aid him in "restraining his young men from bad thoughts and actions." In consequence of this amiable arrange ment a detachment of French troops was sent...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN-ADVOCATE. 117 1 Whon the Count of Mondova became Viceroy of Mexico, in 1686, and found that the French under La Salle had attempted to gain a foothold on the coast, he appointed Captain Alonzo de Leon, Governor of Coahuila, and or dered him to establish a military post there. When this was accomplished, he pressed toward the coast to drive the French from their post on Lavacca river. He arrived at the ruins of Fort St. Louis early in the year of 1689. On his return trip he visited the vil lages of the Cenis Indians, where he found some of La Salle's colonists cap tives, recovered them, and humanely returned them to their own country. In 1690 de Leon again visited Texas. At tha time he founded the mission San Juan Bautista, on the lower Bio Grande, near Presidio. It was the first mission, and there, on May 25, 1690, the first Mass was 'celebrated in Texas. The same year de Leon also projected a mission at the ruined Fort St. Louis, to be called San Francisco, yet on accoun...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

m 118 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. once more. Therefore in May, 1744, they went across the river to the eas tern side, and there laid the foundation of the Alamo. "Thus, after wandering from place to place, a distance of over 150 miles, in the wilds of this unknown land, for nearly half a century, seeking like 'the weary dove' a resting place and finding none, these good Fathers at last found for. their mission a safe and sure lodgement, and gave their church a name that formed the battle cry of that little army of heroes at San Jacinto on that memorable day which ushered into being the Lone Star State." The Alamo, in time, became a place of safe refuge whereto the monks and members of other missions fled in their days of stress and trouble, always find ing there helpful hands and tender hearts to welcome them. In 1716 the San Augustine Mission was founded for the Ayish Indians on what is now Ayish bayou, the Nacog doches Mission in what is now Nacog doches county for the Nacogdoches, and t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

lip ' img 1 119 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. -wmm w'P WfWiJipppj' '" n " ppwppwppipp put together in the most substantial and skillful manner, and when compared with buildings in San Antonio erected at about the same time, that still withstand the ravages of time, the thoughtful mind is immediately led to the conclusion that the portions of the missions used for barracks for sol diers, and purposes of defense, were more or less demolished by the advancing or retreating armies of Mexico in the war waged for the subjugation of Texas. However this may be, the fact still remains that they are now mostly de cayed and ruined, leaving but faint evidences of the great labor and skill employed in their con struction, and the untiring devotion of the Fran ciscans in planting the Cross among the wild and savage Indians of this almost boundless waste of prairie, mountain and vale. In San Jose de Aguayo, at the time of secularization, had within its fold about one hundred Christian Indians, men, women a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

lI... . iiii?fiHwi'WH)Trr TTm tHTi?7 120 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. & - - X IV almost crumbled to the ground. But the chapel, somewhat looking modern ized, is still in use, and religious ser vices are hold there regularly. The San Francisco de la Espada Mis sion is on the opposite side of the river from San Juan. It seems never to have been very prosperous, and to-day is a pile of ruins. In 1734 a company of Franciscan monks from Santa Fo established the San Saba Mission, on the river to which it gave its name, in what is now Me nard County. Says a historian : "The mission was doing well, and the Fathers were encouraged to hope for the speedy Christianization of the numerous and warlike Comanches who maintained friendly relations with them." But just when hope was brightest in their hearts, and seemed near fulfillment, a blow fell that crushed out everything in death. In 1752 a silver mine was discovered near the mission. This drew a number of reckless adventurers to the place, and so...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

121 'Jtye Aijgel of jpargatory. How many sweet reminiscences this recalls to a Christian mind. MONTH OF THE DEAD. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. November, "the month of yellow leaves," in the expressive language of the Iroquois, turns our thoughts to the realities of life and that which lies be yond. Along the upland hills the part Tidge whistles in the twilight, the chill wind blows across the stubble, the leaves snap and fall, or flutter deso lately upon the quivering boughs, and the thin, blue mist of autumn lies upon every valley. "The pale, descending year, yet pleasing still A gentle mood inspires. For now the leaf Incessant rustles from the mournful grove, Oft startling such as studious, walk below, And slowly circles thro' the waving air." It is a time when "The desolated prospect thrills the soul." It is the month of the dead. Nature, herself, seems to sorrow over her departed chil dren. If wo look across the blackened fields, something in the lessened bright ness of the sun, in the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

J ) WJB,"''"HW J 'frt 122 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. M s which God himself designed. Poets seek for beauty in the mythology of tho Greeks, the Persians, tho Romans the beliefs of the Pharaos are brought to light, the my thus of India exhumed, Babylon and Nineve yield up their treasures yet the beauty of all these combined can not compare with the beauty of Catholic belief. The Catho lic poet who understands his religion, and comprehends its beauty, has at his hand a nobler store than is comprised in all the treasures of pagan mythology. It is the House of Beauty, the Temple of Truth, the Abode of Love, since God, its Author is Himself Beauty, Truth and Love. It is with the latter aspect of our holy faith that we are at present con cerned. Out of the fullness of love, flows sweetest consolation, and than the doctrine of Purgatory, what belief can be more consoling? "The holiest charity is that of prayer for the poor souls," says one who was herself a Saint, and this especial aspect of our ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

mwimm T "winn KmmwmnnmZiTzr THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 123 ymmmmm u- wider hope, warmer love, and no loss poetry. Beyond tho melancholy pros pect, the hoot of the owl in the ivy mantled tower, the sunset clang of tho curfew-boll, tho receding vision of physical objects along the "glimmering landscape," he would have looked with tho eye of faith, and charity would have prompted him to utter a prayer for the "rude forefathers of the hamlet" here sleeping. It is the one warm dash of color needed, and it is omitted. The Reformation deprived literature of a perfect Christian poem. It gave us, instead, a great poem, certainly, but one little removed in sentiment from a pagan classic. The same may be urged against Bryant's "Thanatopsis." The Catholic custom of priest and people gathering in the cemetery and praying for tho souls departed, on All Saint's Day, is one of mournful and solemn beauty. Its pathos and tender ness are indiscribable. Here, amid the dead, stand priest and people praying th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

wpwwp ( saw QVl 124 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I n 5 I ! "4 ready to aid a noble cause, and never did the needy apply to her in vain. Her charity knew no bounds: But what she knew best of all was how to give; she was possessed of that rare talent of heart, that exquisite tact and delicacy of soul which adds charm to a benefit and doubles the value of a gift. During many years she was a zealous supporter of Indian missions and the Indian Advocate owes her a debt of undying gratitude. May God bless her gentle soul and reward her many good worksl n. i. r. HARVEST. "The fields are whitening 'neath the .ripening grain, I long to toil among the reapers there ; What full ripe sheaves I'll gather ere the rain, To prove ray gratitude for God's dear care." Thus saying, resolute and proud I stood Amid the ever-hurrying, busy throng, Waiting to see, in somewhat anxious mood, The Lord and Master as He came along. He came, and pressing through the eager throng I stood beside Him near the open gate ; "M...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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