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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 3, No, 47. Destroys Insects on Grapevines, The United States consul at Geneva, Switzerland reports a new composition to put on grape vines which has been tried in that country and has been found suc cessful in killing the insects. Two mayors of Swiss cities have written certifying to the efficiency of the treatment in destroying phylloxera. One of the mayors says: "Each one of the vines we had treated with the preparation had a large growth of new roots while those not treated perished. The growth was very abundant, the grape ripened at the proper time and we have not found a single trace of the phylloxera in any of the roofs." The following is a translation from a Swiss paper: "One of the important causes of the agricultural crisis lies in the ever-increasing inroads of diseases of all kinds which are attacking the products which we cultivate. Therefore, in the eager fight we have to keep up, to lift our agricul ture out of the difficult and serious crisis it i...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

4 The selecting varieties, securing seed, testing on range and field are of vital interest*to you. The power stored in growing and sowing seed is the greatest power known, and may result in good or ill, in proportion to the wisdom or ig norance ruling our action. Some grasses possess such strong power of endurance combined with usefullness, that they are almost indestructnble ; others are evil things cursing the earth on which they grow. Some reproduce themselves from seed so abundantly that once in troduced are always, with us, while many with running roots possess the ground against all comers. Knowing of these forces we must control them if we wish them to serve our purpose. Some valuable scientific work along these lines at the Pullman agricultural college has been done with good results. At Yakinu experiment station we are sow ing about 600 varieties of grasses and fodder plants for the purpose of obtain ing seeds to test on the ranges and farms. The 0. R. & N. I believe ar...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

mon to see a man riding on the grain wheel of a binder to hold it down. A Condemned History of Funning. The history of every good agricul tural region has been the same, from the time of Abraham to the present. First the herdsman utilizes the natural forage until, tempted by the desire for immediate gains, he overstocks the &nge and destroys the source of his 'income. Then comes the farmer, who, until the original fertility of the soil is gone, confines his operations to rais ing grains and hay for the market. When the soil beings to show exhaus tion, and it is no longer possible to grow grain and hays at a profit, the farmer begins to cast about him for some means of making a livelihood without each year selling a large part '■( the crop-producing power of his farm. Then ensues the era of stock mising. when crops are marketed as meat, milk, or wool, leaving the plant food on the farm to be returned to the soil. Farming in the Palouse country has been no exception to this well-n...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

r. Conquoring Difficuties. Prepared for delivery before the Wash ington State Dairymen's Asso ciation. "Labor conquers all" is an old proverb, and just as true as it is old true if considered in the right light. It is untrue, if we consider labor as meaning simply physical exertion, but true if we think of it as meaning both physical and mental exertion. It is painfully true that too many of our farmers and dairymen, or "cow-keep ers," are laboring with the difficulty of not bein^ able to combine the phy sical and the mental powers of their own bodies, and so are working at a great disadvantage. To the casual observer there is per haps but few difficulties with which the dairyman meets. The main one is that of being unable to construct a milk stool of sufficient strength to successfully act as an instrument of punishment when the cow fails to ful fill the desires of her attenuant. Perhaps the greatest difficulty with which we struggle today is that we are unable to conduct the dairy...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

ill fact there aif very few who are fully satisfied with any method yet present ed. The stanchion is convenient and safe, but cruel, and I think should be abolished by all dairymen. The old way of tying with a rope is very unhan dy and takes too much time. The chain, which slides on a pole, is very convenient, and the favorite with many. *Bnt I think, with those who have tried it, the Carlyle method is about as pop ular as any. Each cow is placed in a stall 3% feet wide and is not tied. Be hind her. and about 32 inches above the Moor, is a chain or rope, which is se curely fastened at one side of the stall. After the cow has passed in the chain is fastened to a hook at the other side which1 keeps her a prisoner till such time as her attendant sees fit to un hook the chain and so release her. From 4 feet 4 inches to 5 feet from the manger is a gutter, into which the ma nure and water drop. With this method the cow has the free use of her head, she may be quickly and easily fastened a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY. In the intereHts of the Farmers.Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Absorbed the 'Washington State Monthly." PUBLISHED BY THE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFFICES - SEATTLE, WASH BUSINESS OFFICES: SEATTLE, - - 315 316 Pioneer Block SPOKANE, Suite ¥ HypotheeK Bank Building Subscription, in advance * l per year. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer Block, Seattle, Wash An inquiry has come to a firm in Seattle, for a fruit preparation that is not on the market. The matter was referred to us and we mention it for the benefit of our readers. The inquiry came from a very large manufacturing firm in Sydney, New South Wales, engaged in manufacturing jams, spices, putting up pickles, etc., They occupy a building several stories high and covering a whole block. They are recommended as a gilt edge firm. What they want is pulped fruit, very small onions, gherkins, ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

Pacific Northwest Cattlegrowers' Association. February 15, 10 and 17 the conven tion of Northwest cattlemen was held at Pendleton, Ore. It was a very suc cessful meeting in every way, large in attendance, large in interest manifested and successful in the many valuable addresses given and the great benefit * each one carried home. We give sev eral of the addresses in this issue and several others will be given later. Very great importance is attached to such a meeting as this. We are glad it has been held and also glad that a complete organization has been effected, to be known as the Pacific Northwest Cattlegrowers' Association. The organization will hold annual meetings, the meeting next year will be held at Walla Walla the second week in February. Some good busi ness was transacted. A constitution and by-lawa were adopted. Probably the most important action covers the branding of cattle. All members of the association are required to furnish a copy of their brand to the secretary...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

10 Who is to Mame? The season foil selling and buying fancy eggs will soon be here and an other record of wrongs will be record ed. The buyer will think he is the of fended one and the fancier will think that his troubles will never cease. The fancier will send out a setting of eggs, believing them to be all right, and in time will receive a letter denouncing him as a fraud, etc. He may s« nd out. say, three settings of eggs from the same yard on the same day to three separate parties. One will report a good hatch; one will say nothing anil one will report a bad hatch. Who is to blame? Last season we remembei sending two settings of turkey eggs to different parties in California. One netting hatched every egg; the other hatched but four or five turks —we for get which. Eggs sent ."5,000 miles often hatch better than eggs sent twenty five miles — according to reports. So we could go on indefinitely, but enough. Who is to blame? Well, we don't know. All fanciers are not alike, neither...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

BUZZINGS. By Mrs. Chas. Lee. Our loss in bees up to date, for the winter, are three colonies out of two hundred; wintered on summer stands, without protection. Order your supplies for the apiaiy at once, and have the supers all ready «• and waiting for the bees instead of the bees waiting for the supers. It is claimed by some bee-ko< per that carbolic acid 4 usedj to paint the doorstep of the hive being robbed, will effectually stop the trouble, as every bee that passes over the acid will not be allowed to enter its own home. Length of tongue in bees has been somewhat discussed in the journals lately. Mr. J. M. Rankin, in cnuigf of the Michigan Experiment Apiary, claims that he has increased the length of tongue of one strain of bees two tenth millimeter the past season. This, of course, was done by crossing. He has proved it by actual measurement. An orchardist in Gloucester, Eng- land, planted 200 acres of fruit; the orchard was a complete failure in fruit bearing until a Scotc...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

12 An Experiment Harm. ricpaiations air being made for comnient-ing operations on the experi ment farm to he started at Stokes, under thfl auspices of the O. R. & N. between I'niatilia and Wallula, where the company has set aside 160 acres. The Barley ditch is accessible for the Irrigation Of any part of this, so that experiments can be made in growing various plants with or without irriga tion. The farm will be in sight of passing trains, and passengers who desire will be allowed to stop there to examine the workings of the scheme. Among the plants which are to he ex perimented with at first are cotton, sorghum, alfalfa, tobacco, peanuts, sweet potatoes, Austrian brawn grass, red clover, hemp, flax, German millet, Russian grass, rape seed, vetches, etc. The farm at Stokes will be the cen tal experiment station, but seeds and plants will be furnished to farmers in arid and semi arid sections, who desire to supplement the work of Ihe com pany and test fur themselves the adaptabil...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

THE MARKETS. Notice that up to the present we have boon giving generally what the com mission merchant* were paying, bu( now we will give what prices they arc selling produce at. This change is made so we can give more Bteady quo tations. The selling price is what oilier newspapers give also. SEATTLE. Butter and cheese remain the same as last week. Fancy native creamery, brick, -7c; ranch, 22@23c: dairy, 18@ 22c: cheese, native Washington, 120 13c. Eggs are problematical. The supply and demand are about equal, but the Eastern price has weakene 1 and there is a strong tendency for a weakening here in sympathy. Fresh ranch. 21 @ 23c; fresh Eastern, 20c. Many eggs are coming from California. Choice dressed beef steers, prime, 7c; cows, prime, 6@6M>c; mutton, B'i'C; pork. 6'ic; veal, small, Be. Chickens, live, per lb, hens, Il(ftl2c; dressed. 13 1 /^c; turkeys, live, 12c; dressed, 16c. Potatoes —Yakimas, |14®15 per ton; natives, $ll(?x113; carrots, per sack. 50c. Beets, per sack, 75c...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

14 Rocks Breaking Plows. Often plows and harness are broken and horses injured by the plow strik ing hidden rocks when the team is un der full headway. 1 have also known of mowers and binders being broken by rocks protruding above the ground. The big driving wheel or some other part of the machine would hit them and crack would go the tongue or dou ble-trees. Would it not be well and would it not pay to get rid of them; dig them out or bury them. Those who are acquainted with explosives could break up the big rocks. In some sections of the country this work can be done now, or at some other season of the year when work is not very pressing. Of course if rocks are too thick on any farm, they cannot be entirely removed. American Fruit in Germany. The fore part of February Germany issued a decree which prohibited the importation of every kind of American fresh fruits. This action has now been modified, because of the vigorous protest made by Ambassador White and the state department at...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

Beginners With Bees. One who is not thoroughly acquaint ed with the management of bees should start with but one or two colonies, then with the aid of some good work on beo culture one cannot well make a mis take, as all works published now treat and pathology, and describes the na the subject alike on the principal points in connection with bees, so that there y»s nothing but. the one course of man agement laid down by all. Some of the works are very cheap, says the Agri cultural Epitomist. and are sold at 50 cents, and others are more elaborate, have many engravings, and cover the work more in detail, and cost from $1 to $2. The best time to begin is in early spring, although there is nothing to hinder commencing at any time of the year, except in dead of winter. Of course we cannot do anything with bees in winter, and the proper thing is to let the bees strictly alone in winter, except when necessary to look after their weifare during a warm spell of weather. Bees vs. Carrier Pig...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 February 1898

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF IN THE MARKET. Bean Hydrolic Pump. yermorcl Nozzle. Hop Nozzel Myera Rn,.ijpt mid Kurrpl Vermorel Nozzle. Hop No/.zel JijeiH Jiuucei ana narrei MITCHELL, LEWIS & STAYER CO., 308-310 First Aye. South. Seattle, Wash. *"** •••••••• •••••••••••• ••• j-::'H'f* !:__ ' KEEP YOUR MONEY ■'^bjj^ft'' We buy the raw material at HOME and employ HOME labor, hence those who spend their money with us spend it at HOME, and with those who keep it at HOME. The past six years has proven that our prices are LOWER and the quality of our goods are HIGHER than can be secured elsewhere. We do not ask -fig™™ you to take our word for it, give us a trial and see for your- ! self. A finely illustrated catalogue free. jsi C. fl. %B. S. PHENICIE, KOJ irfP^lPt fflmUulJj, HiStl A)—J . . ,■'

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

MNCHAND Range M^' -ftf' ISSUED EVERY WEEK Ik- " Vol. 3, No. 48. j-tttmtt#mtttttmm»ti»tuiiiiiiiiiiimtt_^ 1 LARGEST ASSORTMENT I It Iti the Pacific Notfthuuest of 8 | Agricultural Implements [I Embracing the Most Popular Approved Lines. 5 I Everything that a Farmer Needs. 1 4**4* y_^^^_s. Tut 5? /_^^^^^^___ >m_\ ' 1**1" TT '-^ _>_\ __ *^*^* _M_ ' "*"i iSsLt^ vwf ». 1 !_.-■i^s^^^^^X "s"^* .Lj. ■nsH 11 a ¥*! f^ fp-fn A VTn_s4 lF__3_i«kvMfesV'£*lK\ n\\ \\ 4»»4* ■ % I\ itiXl •—i-W_*"»ssT*,77r^vl_x r\Y~. \\ __wMm 1\ t*^ vf _fl_ B^. £■_■**. '"'—^s_\. Ir —■ \ \\__r—i \^Sii a^i r***' ■■_-«--■ ■ ■___! *^"T -_flflßl__ S^____^___________i ''^^"-*--J's_f^^___pi-B_S_t- *r**v* -j.rf- l^a_°**^ M,"TTi-iT^-_^_Bfflffl_ffWl_H--*^ t-*-^l"- u *^ n^^___*_:^-:? *^^j*^*^^^^** g^ *._ I WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS: 1 | WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS: 1 ,1 "BAB^Z,r«irr ß8' ■"-._• H IMPROVE YOUR DAIRIES- ,j(ji I ''^^r^L.™ 0*8- |f ■» improve your dairies. | it SIGNS IMPROVED. _^B|_^ _-Wj 1 FARM BUTTER UNSALABLE Th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

2 DO YOU contemplate the purchase of a new threshing rig this year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on this -^^^~ coast? If so write us for catalogue. Mailed free on ap plication. '©A P-nrrin^Q ' /AJ^— Threshers, JL__/X x^xx XwOj ||j|| = -_^^^^ *»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦'♦♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦♦♦♦■»♦♦ JtM' * P iSp^t". I lifiS™ \> -<<^s£?*"****f"*«^_is4l _^T\ sO*/*/v*rm >m>m>m>wvvm' Mrm'*ree-vwwwvwv *&v|" •! ■ "j J T| i R v,-^&^7\ IL// t___->. sx\ *^T^ "tf «f (°f ° /^^*^V\a »^^fe_^^_l? BBS-Hi '-jj***** I_T_>_*C <s;.w Mill<s HvTOi^V Horse Powers, THE "RUSSELL" Compound Traction Engine takes the lead. It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner. Write us for particulars. Russell & Co., SSStSS.iI- Portland, Oregon. teweMMimtHMiiffimiHiiMiiiimiimiMMM • • •■•■•■■•»»www-p----------- I — — —" The Annie Wright Seminary, x jc jc 3£ 2£ X Tacoma, Washington, J3C X X attended this school in the _____—— i_l-,___...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 3, No, 48. Its Great Value to You. Editor Ranch and Range: Permit me through your columns to call the attention of cattlemen to the very great importance of the Pacific Northwest Cattle Growers' Association which was launched into being at Pen dleton, Oregon, Feb. 15-17. Every man who owns cattle of any kind in the Pa cific Northwest will find it to his finan cial advantage to become a member of this organization. The benefits are numerous and important. Stray Cottle Paid For. In the first place it simplifies the question of strays. Arrangements will soon be perfected whereby a member of the association need not bother about those of his cattle that stray oft', for when they are shipped to market the inspectors of the association will see to it tint the money for them will be sent to the real owner Every principal cat tle market in the country will have these inspectors, so that there is abso lutely no danger of loss from cattle go ing astray, if the cattle are ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

'1 years ago, ranging from $ 100 to $300. Some very rare specimens of this class have sold at auction in our Chicago market the first week in January as high as $450. When Hambletonian stallions with size to produce this class have been lacking the French coach horse has been crossed with the trotting brood mares, with extremely good re sults, and it is the opinion of the best breeders and horsemen that we will have to cross our good trotting brood mare" with the French coach horse to produce light harness horses large enough to meet the coach horse demand. It is believed that this cross breeding will produce a fixed type of coach horse that will possess size and quality, ac tion and style, and still retain the road qualities required, as every light har ness horse should be well bred in order to stand the wear and tear and hard work of pavements and the long drives of city service, and the more he partakes of the blood of the trotter the better. The greatest need of the present day...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

The La Grande Institute. And an artiile on the "Best Fruits," by John E. Hough. An extremely valuable Farmers' institute was held at La Grande, Or., February 22, 23 and -24. The attend ance was large, and the subjects were handled by practical men in an able and interesting way. Many valuable ideas were gained by those whose ac quaintance with codlin moths and gophers had been unfortunate, those who had failed to coax their hens to lay at the proper time, and all who de sired information in regard to the most profitable varieties of trees and sugar beets. The first paper was "The Best Fruits for Commercial Purposes," by John E. Hough. He said: |»l 11..1i1t Varielit**. •The best fruits for commercial pur poses for the whole state of Oregon Would be very difficult to attempt to .enumerate or speak of. As a whole it would be still more difficult to segre gate each variety suitable for any in dividual locality on account of soils, elevation and climatic influences. The time of year at w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 March 1898

6 Range-Bred Calves for Corn-Belt Feed-Lots. We publish the following article by request. It was written for the Breed er. Gazette by F. F. B. Sotham. It will call the attention of our readers to {be value of good blood in steers for feeding, the nice prices good steer calves command and the confidence feeders have in the future when they contract wholesale for calves for delivery next fall at $24 per head: 'h Some years ago I became convinced that before many years rolled by the great grazing districts of the West— known as the range—would become the cradle of the American beef production. I claimed that range calves taken at weaning time with their veal flesh were equal to any class of similar grade of good blood and that it was their bad wintering* that stunted them. I have not been situated so that. I could con duct feeding operations myself, but have been instrumental in filling the feed-lots of certain noted feeders with prime feeding-cattle. At first 1 bought in Missouri and ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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