ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

as often as the condition of land and season made it necessary. Every day the ground remains in a crusted condi tion there is a loss of growth of tree, and if it be loaded with fruit, so much greater will be the necessity of thor ough cultivation in order to conserve the moisture needed to carry the fruit to maturity, and at the same time keep the trees in a healthy growing condi tion and induce them, if possible, to make fruit buds for a crop the ensu ing year. Any crop which requires careful cul tivation, as corn, potatoes, melons, cabbage, and other vegetables may be grown in the orchard with advantage to the trees and profit to the owner. There are also other crops which may be profitably grown in the orchard (while young), notably, strawberries, raspberries, red clover and cow-peas, and for a cover crop for winter protec tion to root system, rye may be sown in the fall and used for winter pasture for hogs. No one should attempt to grow all of these crops in his orchard. And as ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

6 THE DAIRY The Oleo Decision. Dairymen and farmers generally will be pleased to know that the manufac ture of oleomargarine is practically at an end. This is at least true of the colored article. The present oleo law requires the manufacturers of oleo to pay a tax of one-fourth of one cent per pound on all oleomargarine manu iactured to which no coloring matter has been added, and a tax of ten cents per pound on all oleomargarine colored 10 imitate butter. The latter tax is so nigh that it prevents the oleo manu facturers from competing with genuine butter. They can, of course, continue to manufacture the product without adding coloring matter, but it is not likely that they will find any very great sale for their product in that condition. Many have consumed oleo in the past, never dreaming but that they were eating good country or creamery butter, as it is a fact that modern appliances of the oleo manu facturers have been improved to such an extent and their skill in making this ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

disagreeable to most persons. Rye pasture is one of the best to induce a large flow of milk, and the way this should be done is to feed the cows, when they are put in the stable to be milked night and morning, what nice, early cut clover hay they will eat, and also given a feed of grain. In this way the peculiar grassy flavor is re duced or toned down so that instead of being disagreeable it is usually liked. If, when following out this method, the peculiar flavor is still too strong, let the cows run on rye past ure but part of the day. You will find that the man who makes sure he washes his hands clean before milking his cows will make his dairy farm pay better than will the man who does not wash h s hands It is not that the money is made by that one act, but if the man believes in the importance of little things he will make his business suc cessful Most men fail, not on the main issue, but on the little things. There are yet a great many farm ers who do not believe that it would...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. 8. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, Ellensburg, Wash., or direct to The Kancb. AH ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Notice to Contributors. The names of contributors must ac company articles sent in for publication and questions which are to be answered personally should contain a stamp for reply, otherwise they will be only an swered in the household department of The Ranch. Clara: You say you wish to dress becomingly and so you will not at tract attention to the fashion of your garments. Then you must select shades of material which will not at tract attention and follow the old, but worn out, rule in regard to the fash ion: "Be not the first to put it on nor last to take it off." Mrs. M. C. writes: "Can any of the readers of the household department of The Ranch tell me how to utilize my worsted scraps in a quilt? I have crazy patchwork, log cabin, and a long nine pat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

Call or Write to rwrnvTmwr SECOND <" _ _ EVERYTHING .._____ Cli -'?^^l _ KNOWN ISL. Sherman, Clay <& Co. : ow" IN AMERICA 711 Second Avenue, SEATTLE MUSIC San Francisco, Cal. Oakland, Cal ~~~ """ " ...... il Vaii O«t* Dim .^^^ / _^^mib*>S w rf~~\ *** 'y y 1 '-^* ■ You Can Buy f L** —I r _ jfKr?lf / 31 \u- v .:SC" 1 Do you reallze what wonderful *™"—l^■■■■■■■■■'*' >l—— fJ3|A / \ j^NJi^fj^l^'^ means of entertainment a Victor il _^ ?K-r <^ Talking Machine affords? Did you W m^^B^^^^ if i l^y^\ —JZr—^r^^ " i^s~^ ever think that by Its reproductions, 7 V-^ Vj^^j;^^y v^^ i§? you can brlngr the music, the oratory, nHt Mm Stelnway & Sons Pianos from 1525 to $1500 V St^^?^^ 3^ jfjJgisiL~ tne wit and the humor of the world A' B ' Cnase " ' " 175 to 750 V*2 (K\ __--^^^^^- ' right Into your own home? i^^w' IT Estey " " 400 to 500 I^|j^j?O^(\j2L "" ■ j*^- Victor Talking Machines have 1 Emerson " " ' 375 to 450 reached such perfection, that they .flVv^Rv A Starr " " 325 to ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Communications for this department may be sent to Mrs. S. C. Butcher, EUensburg, Wash., or direct to The Kanch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Notice to Contributors. The names of contributors must ac company articles sent in for publication and questions which are to be answered personally should contain a stamp for reply, otherwise they will be only an swered in the household department of The Ranch. Clara: You say you wish to dress becomingly and so you will not at tract attention to the fashion of your garments. Then you must select shades of material which will not at tract attention and follow the old, but worn out, rule in regard to the fash ion: "Be not the first to put it on nor last to take it off." Mrs. M. C. writes: "Can any of the readers of the household department of The Ranch tell me how to utilize my worsted scraps in a quilt? I have crazy patchwork, log cabin, and a long nine pat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

SECOND Ca" or Write to I EVERYTHING SECOND < _ EVERYTHING STL. Sherman, Clay (a Co. T WN IN AMERICA 7/1 Second Avenue, SEATTLE MUSIC San Francisco, Cal. Oakland, Cal /O '7^7=77^ You Can Buy f JLO* m 1 * _ AA4 jn^T^^CSfe^ A Piano On Our / £7 7V yi/l l\?^l |BF^;',.;«r J^__3ZJ Plan v/ - jfKf^lf >^ 31 \u- -^P^^f Do you realize what wonderful ———^———# MlO / \ /Rk\S^Jssr means of entertainment a Victor iA V N4^4^»^«*figHs3P2^ Talking Machine affords? Did you • <m^^^^^^ ■// \ly<^ -«i ,—.?Z-L^—-^~ r''' r^ffi^ ever think that by its reproductions, '/ V-^" \s=siimy .l/tPJ^ you can bring the music, tho oratory, flßk .^V Stelnway & Sons Pianos from $525 to $1500 L ijjg^g^ jwMm^ the wlt an the humor of the world ' A- B Chase " " 475 to 750 Ki^^'T^rV ___^^^^p- right into your own home? /^k'^W Estey " " 400 to 500 l^j_^?O >t\^ > -j£sss— Victor Talking Machines have J^^Bv m Emerson " " 375 to 450 reached such perfection, that they 1 Starr " " 325 to 375 have even been mistaken...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

10 POULTRY H. L. BLANCHARD Communications for this department are solicited. Personal experiences detailed and questions prove of great benefit. Write to H. L. Blanchard at Hadlock, Wash., or direct to The Ranch, Seattle. The Dreaded Roup. No disease of poultry has received more attention than this one. It is the one disease that we all dread, and yet, if our flocks are watched closely and prompt measures taken, all may be saved. Several years ago the writer was called to a farm to investigate the outbreak of a serious trouble which had entailed great loss. At first glance we saw that the damp quarters had in oculated the entire flock with a seri ous case of roup. We explained to the owner the trouble and purchased twen ty of the worst cases at 10 cents each. We took them home and placed them in a warm, dry room, heavily covered with straw. We then began the follow ing treatment: With a small syringe filled with coal oil we washed out the nostrils and throat twice a day. We then fed...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

Prof. Piper on the Cutworm. Prof. C. V. Piper, formerly entom ologist at the state agricultural col lege, but now with the department of agriculture at Washington, was on the coast last week. He had read the articles in The Ranch on the cut worm and other caterpillars, and makes the following comment on the original article that provoked the con troversy: "In the article referred to the writer has confused at least three kinds of caterpillars, namely, the cabbage worm, which feeds on cabbage and related plants and whose parent is a white butterfly; the variegated cut worm (Peridroma suacia), which feeds on almost any kind of foliage, and which was particularly abundant in 1900, and the alder tent caterpillar, which is abundant in the forests this year, feeding mainly on alder. The parent of the variegated cutworm is a dull purplish-gray moth which flies at dusk and later, while that of the tent caterpillar is a yellowish moth. "The cabbage worm is now weil established and does some ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

12 THE FIELD The Drainage of Farm Lands. The proper drainage of lands that do not readily drain themselves is a most important matter. In the culti vation of retentive soils drainage is the key of all improvement. Farm ers often desire an improvement in methods and in the general manage ment of their lands without being sufficiently informed regarding the specific changes that will bring it about, or clear in their minds as to the profits that would accrue should such changes be made. When a farmer finds his lands too wet for cul tivation he admits the necessity of drainage for the time being, but of ten hopes that the following season may be more, favorable, which hope is frequently realized. Thus he takes the loss in one season from too much moisture as one of the contiugencies of the busines of farming. This is the wrong way to look at the matter. Proper drainage means that a very short time after the coming of too much moisture he can begin culti vation of his land and preparing...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

LEGAL NOTES K. J. BOKYKK This department Is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will bf> answered free In these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer. care The Ranch. Negotiable Instruments. (1) When the name of the payee or indorsee is wrongfully designated or misspelled, he may indorse the instru ment as therein described, adding, if he thinks fit, the proper signature. (2) Where any person is under ob ligation to indorse in a representative capacity, he may indorse in such ne gative terms as to avoid liability. (3) An instrument negotiable in its origin continues to be negotiable un til it has been restrictively indorsed or discharged by payments. (4) The holder of a negotiable in strument may sue thereon in his own name; and payments to him in due course discharges the instrument. Who is a holder in due course: — (a) Where it is complete and regular upon its face; (b) Where he becomes the holder of it...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

14 LIVE STOCK Stockmen Meet in Denver. Recognizing that there are no ques tions of greater importance to stock men of the United States than an amicable settlement of the questions of grazing on the public lands and forest reserves, the National Live Stock association at its convention in 1900 adopted a resolution providing for a committee to draft bills which would provide for the leasing of the public range and the use of forest reserves under certain restrictions. The people of the grazing states at that time were not ready to accept a change in the conditions which had existed since the stock raising had become one of the leading industries of the country, and consequently the initial effort failed. The association, however, has been prosecuting a dili gent campaign of education along these lines ever since, and at this time, be cause of the restricted and unsatisfac tory conditions under which the forest reserves are conducted, the stockmen are apparently ready to get together ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

easy for men to pass up dipping and many think that the federal regula tions are too much in favor of care less owners and not calculated to stop the mischief. There is no possible or palpable excuse for bad dipping, and yet we know of hundreds of cases where it is treated as an intolerable nuisance to be rid of at the least trou ble and expense. Let the watchword be dip thoroughly, preach it every where, adopt it, encourage it, enforce it, for in the dipping process alone can the disease find its ultimate and certain eradication. Livestock Notes. If the dam is in proper condition, the pigs come into the world with the chances in their favor to make a good start. The majority of farmers work the mares that raise their colts. This is all right, provided the mare is kept in good flesh so that she will produce a large amount of milk. It does not pay to stunt the colt because such individuals never make big horses. A horse that is overfed is one whose digestion is to be sooner or later ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 July 1904

16 Work and Drudgery \at*K. TT&9 43 m+£3k #«? €* HSff£****%*****% in the meaning of these two r^\ M mm%*M Cr #9 €M mJmam%Sm %5mm%*%5 words. They both imply "la- JS|F%I % bor", but the words are com cdyifc|^M parative. A person can take pleasure in his work, but he will riot find pleasure in drudgery. [\.S^l~^*^WiSl!^ Th? one can make him PPy and contented, the other will make him cross and irritable. S|^ it tSllik This is just the difference and this is also the dividing line between the convenient light- SbH S TUBULAR SEPARATOR : I^tH I illli and the "other kind" Do not think that "Separators are all about the same" for this is A ii J * i i If! not so—far from it. There is one kind that runs so lightly that it can be truly said that "it <uL\ vSmM^I i 1 iHii-A turns at a breath." This kind is the Tubular. There are others that run so hard that their <*p£^£rgjl JHtlßi^ 'fHrivS manufacturers state that Hand Separators are not practical above 600 lbs. per hour, for ! nJßrJ^^B...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

THE RANCH •'Z-^*'*** ''**'* *,"**• '*'*^'*'Zf£j*S'rffrVi**/t •',;•*'•".*/ "'•",*.', ■'*■*'/, */"'" *■'* '**'»* *'" : ->- " VOL. XXI. NO. 15. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, AUGUST 1, 1904. Owner Sprinsrdale Hereford Farm, Yakima county. Mr. Splawn is prominently spoken of for governor. He is his own platform, and the farmers of the state would elect him on any old ticket. A. J. SI'LAWN, 50c per Year; 5c the Copy.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

.> EXPERIENCES All subscribers are Invited to write for this column. For each accepted article we give 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing. Make your articles brief and write as often as you like. Separator Springs.—The article by W. M. Scott, in the last issue, on sep arator springs is good. I have a separator and have spent. $6.25 for springs alone in less than three years. Have lately been using a rubber ring, cut from an old wringer roll, that gives entire satisfaction.—W. J. L«.. Pierce Co. Wire Gates.—We see many wire gates, some made to pass through a pasture occasionally and some to open daily at the residence, but very few of them operate properly. I use them almost wholly and prefer them to board gates because they are lighter and are not affected by the wind. The main point is to get a proper connec tion between the gate post and the gate bar. I make this by nailing a piece of hoop iron onto the post and stapling heavy smooth wire onto the bar in such a wa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

THE RANCH The Kiiiich Company, Publishers. Oflteei ::« I)o\rnn liuUding. MII.LXX IKKKMAS ... Kditor and Prop. P. 1,. AXLING Assistant Kditnr Associate Editors: F. WALDEN'. H. L. DLANCHARD. Issued the !• irst and Fifteenth Ka«'h Month. Subscription, In advance, one year, 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an ord«»r to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find It on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription Is shown on your paper by address l...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES Our horticultural editor, Mr. F. Wal den, who broke his right arm in June, is still unable to attend to his de partment in The Ranch and will hardly contribute before September Ist. He is progressing well, however, and hopes to soon be entirely recovered. Gooseberry and Currant Seedlings. We present on this page an illustra tion of a fine Triumph gooseberry grown from seeds. For the illustra tion and descriptive matter this pub lication is indebted to the Rural New Yorker, one of the best and most prac tical farm publications in the country. The Rural New Yorker says currants and gooseberries are to be counted among the fruits easily grown from seeds and likely to reward the grower with a satisfactory average of merit among the seedlings. The Fay currant has probably returned the originator's estate more money than has been realized for any other new fruit variety. It was one of a lot of seed lings raised for experimental purposes. The introducer informed us so...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

moisture in the root bed, but of pre venting the hardening of the layer immediately above the roots. A simple practice which has come into quite general use in our section is to attach a bar of iron, a heavy chain, or piece of hard wood behind the cultivator, properly hung and of sufficient weight to crush the moist clods turned up by the shovels. A slight impact pulverizes the fresh lumps, which a few hours of sun would turn into hard clods. The simple device also levels the sur face, reducing evaporation. The fre quent use of the fine tooth harrow is coming more and more into use to help make and keep the important fine sur face blanket of soil. The great need today is more intelligent and compre hensive labor in our orchards. There is no automatic labor in the success ful orchard. About Borers. •There is so much said about the pre vention of borers in our orchards, that a few words about them, for the bene fit of those unfamiliar with their hab its, may not be out of place. Only ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 August 1904

c THE DAIRY Salt Spring Island Creamery. The practice of retailing feed to our patrons is working most satisfactorily. Many of those who would have kept cows complained of the high price of feed, but that difficulty being swept away the herds are increasing. The man who brings in a wagon load of cream with a strong team of horses may just as well return with the neces sary grain for his cows, and those who bring in one can in the buggy can easily pack one sack home every jour ney or so. A duplicate of the feed is made out by our secretary-buttermaker and signed by the manager. We have imported a buttermaker who has never eaten a bit of lotus in his life. He runs everything by steam. Two secre taries having retired to eat lotus and find something less onerous and more remunerative, we hit on the expedi ent of providing our buttermaker with some stationery and good read ing lamps and installed him as secre tary- We have also invested in a re liable set of scales so that he can weigh o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x