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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Only Natural. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Only Natural. The school principal had been busy all day selecting children from the various classes, to do some special work. She was very tired and also very much pre-occupied when the janitor entered her office. In response to her mechanical nod he began: "Miss M , that crossing out there is dangerous. If they don’t send us a traffic officer some ol the children in this school are going to get killed.’’ She had not really heard his speech, for he was always complaining, so she made no answer. And then he repeated his assertion with some emphasis, ending: "They are going to get killed out there —some of our children.” She had caught the lost phrase, and jneffianically, after her day of classifying, said: "Then I had better pick out the ones I prefer for that.” And the janitor fled.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MODERN DOLL WORK OF ART Children of the Long Ago Were Satisfied With Very Ordinary Counterfeits of Nature. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

MODERN DOLL WORK OF ART Children of the Long Ago Were Satisfied With Very Ordinary Counterfeits of Nature. It Is Interesting to contrast the plump, really truly looking American doll of today with the crude, legless, long-armed w’ooden dollies with which the little Egyptian girls used to play. These Egyptian dolls had wooden hair and funny long arms that reached almost to the knees and they never had any feet at all, says the Boston Post. For clothes all there ever was for them to wear was just a strip of cotton cloth wound round and round their bodies like a bandage. Worse than that, the poor little Mohammedan- children had to play with headless dolls because the queer rulings of their religion wmuld not allow of any imitation of the human figure. Biblical children, Esther and Ruth, probably played with wooden dolls very much like the Egyptian dolls, never a bit more beautiful. Queen Elizabeth had a doll made of tree bark. It was said to be 250 years old before It came Into her pos...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
JUNGLE MONARCH “BIG GAME” Tiger Can Always Be Relied On to Furnish Sport for the Most Adventurous Hunter. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

JUNGLE MONARCH “BIG GAME” Tiger Can Always Be Relied On to Furnish Sport for the Most Adventurous Hunter. The tiger is one variety of game which is in no danger of extermination. Tigers have been hunted for centuries. They furnished sport to the ancient Romans, both in the arena where they faced the gladiators and la the open field. Before that, they were the game of great Egyptian monarchs. It is doubtful whether primitive man was able to kill the tiger at all. Today tigers are comparatively easy game for the wealthy sportsmen who hunt them with the great double-bar-reled English rifles carrying express bullets. A great crowd of beaters usually assists at the sport, and drives the tiger Into the open, though occasionally he is killed by watching at the carcass of an animal he has killed. Occasionally a tiger kills a hunter, but not often. In India and also in Korea many unarmed and half-naked natives are killed by tigers ever year. In the war betwen men and tigers it Is hard to Say...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Beauty Contest In Africa. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Beauty Contest In Africa. The Africa and Orient Review, a South African newspaper, has started a beauty contest for dusky belles and already 300 entries have been received for the competition. The editor, Mr. Mohamed All, thus describes the negress face: “The eyes,” he said, “should have the African expression, a soft, appealing 100k —an intangible dreaminess, never seen in European eyes. The nose should be semi-aqui-llne, slightly squat at the bridge, and the lips somewhat thicker than those of the average European, a characteristic which I think gives solidity to the-expression. The hair should, of course, be curly.” Photographs of the competitors will be reproduced each month, and the readers of the Journal will be asked to vote for the photograph they consider the most beautiful, the lady receiving the greatest number of votes to be given $5OO. The second prize is $250 and the third a watch bracelet.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
World's Longest Car Ferry. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

World's Longest Car Ferry. The new railway ferry line, which is being planned to run between England and Sweden, will be the longest in the world. A tremendous ferry boat with engines furnishing about 12,000 horse-power is to travel dally between the two countries, bearing upon its huge decks freight trains 48 cars in length. Besides this there will be provisions for taking travelers from the first to the fourth class, together with dining rooms, promenades and other agreeable features. The journey requires 33 hours. After arriving on land the freight train at once proceeds upon the English or Swedish tracks, as the case may be. It is obvious that a tremendous saving both in time and in labor can be thus accomplished.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MADE WAY INTO SACRED CITY Englishman Claims to Be the Only Living European Who Has Set > Foot in Holy Shefshaon. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

MADE WAY INTO SACRED CITY Englishman Claims to Be the Only Living European Who Has Set > Foot in Holy Shefshaon. The Morocco correspondent of the London Times claims to be “almost with certainty” the only living European who has hitherto visited Sheshawan, the mysterious “secret” Mofoccan Inland city which Is officially stated to be occupied by a Spanish expeditionary force. Sheshawan, or more correctly Shefshaon, he writes, is a small town of a few thousand inhabitants situated in the tribeland of the Beni Zejel, about 40 miles to the south of Tetuan. The Times man says he visited it in Moorish disguise In 1888 and only escaped with difficulty. He adds that the towrn is small, built along a sort of terrace on the hffeh mountain side, and is renowned for its springs and streams. With the exception of its picturesque situation among mountains, its aloofness and its surrounding gardens, Shesbawan presents no very particular features. Its inhabitants are poor. Their industri...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
PARODIES ALWAYS IN ORDER Omar Khayyam and the Ever-Delightful Pepys Have by No Means Exhausted the List. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

PARODIES ALWAYS IN ORDER Omar Khayyam and the Ever-Delight-ful Pepys Have by No Means Exhausted the List. Does your memory go back to the time when everyone was writing parodies of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam? When it was considered very literary to know all about Omar, and when all the writers, both would-be and professional, were reducing the hypnotic quatrains to modern terms? The newspapers were full of “Omars Up-to-date,” and quite a lot of them got into the magazines before the craze died down. After that parodists sought other inspiration, but found no material that suited them quite so well, until a few years ago, one of them chanced on the Diary of Samuel Pepys. What a rich vein. The parodists went mad over it, and have been digging there ever since. Almost anybody can fill up a column with chronicles in the Pepys style, while the clever writer, by this means, can make himself entertaining. Some other original genius will soon take the place of Mr. Pepys In the regard of t...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
British Warship Badges. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

British Warship Badges. The British admiralty has decided to provide every British warship in future with its own distinctive badge. These are being designed by Maj, Charles Foulkes, heraldic adviser to the admiralty, who has already Invented 150 badges. Considerable ingenuity has been exercised, as the following examples will show: Venturous, two dice; Sportive, a butting goat; Tactician, a chess knight; Inconstant, a butterfly; Sesame, a key; Sterling, £; Watchful, an eye; Vivacious, head of Mr. Lloyd George; Termagant, a fury; Nile, head of Nelson; Truculent, Britisher smashing a Hun. Each badge will be carved in wood and then cast in brass, colored, and fitted on the quarterdeck, as well as on either bow of the boat. Two plaques are to be used, the smaller one for the boats being about eight Inches square, and the one for the quarterdeck about 18 Inches square. Each badge is designed in some way to represent the name of the boat pictorially, or when that is impossible, embodying...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Flat Feet Treatment Successful. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Flat Feet Treatment Successful. War experiences have changed our views about flat feet. It was at one time assumed that individuals so afflicted were destined to lead sedentary lives, and that they were disqualified from partaking In vocations requiring the constant use of the feet, such as military service. • This erroneous Idea is still universal in Europe and to a large extent in America. It is in weak feet that the bones of the arch drop to the ground, the muscles and ligaments being so weak and flabby that they cannot hold up the arch bones. After a series of treatments in the most chronic cases, the prolapsed bones will gradually rise until they reach their normal height.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“Flivver" Airplanes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

“Flivver" Airplanes. From time to time a photograph appears, depicting a new airplane of compact dimensions and equipped with a low-power engine. Such airplanes are generally hailed as “everybody’s” airplane and the coming “flivvers” of the air. Yet an examination of these machines soon discloses the fact that they are of little practical value. They are too small to be steady in flight, too low-powered to fly under moderately adverse conditions, too flimsy to last long and, taking it all in all, absolutely worthless for serious work of any kind. They should generally be treated as novelties, except in rare Instances. —Scientific American.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Wood Preservatives. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Wood Preservatives. Wood preservatives are found by the United States forest products laboratory to be necessarily soluble enough In water to produce a toxic solution, though In some cases the solubility may be as slight as one-mil-llonth. Sodium fluoride and zinc chloride are freely soluble, the creosotes as a whole only sparingly so. The nontoxic oils appear to act as reservoirs of the toxic ingredients, and to feed them out slowly to the wood.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MAKE FRIENDS WHEN YOU CAN Reason Why One Man Hae Always Sought to Add to His Acquaint* ances Every Day. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

MAKE FRIENDS WHEN YOU CAN Reason Why One Man Hae Always Sought to Add to His Acquaint* ances Every Day. My hobby Is enlarging my acquaintance. For years- I have found pleasure and profit in trying to know as many people as I can. I aim never to let the sun set without knowing at least one more person than I did when I started out In the morning, writes Fred C. Kelly In Leslie’s. Why? My answer is: Why not? Life is made up of human relations. As I look at it the more human contact I achieve the fuller my life should be. By human contact I don’t mean just being in crowds, or places where people are. I mean meeting people, getting their points of view. Lots of city folk who have plenty of daily opportunity to meet and know people don’t get acquainted with as many as a man I know who lives on a farm and never comes to town. Meeting people is one thing, making friends or getting acquainted with them is another. Inasmuch as human beings are admittedly the most interesting things on earth,...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
LOOT STORES OF FIELD MICE North Dakota Indians Raid Caches of Delicacy, but Always Leave Corn in Its Place. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

LOOT STORES OF FIELD MICE North Dakota Indians Raid Caches of Delicacy, but Always Leave Corn in Its Place. In the northern part of North Dakota there grows a bean which is related to the peanut and of which the Indians of that section are very fond. As each plant bears but a single bean, the labor of gathering them would be very great, but the field mice of that section gather the beans and hide them for winter consumption in underground storehouses. The Indians know how to locate the caches and in the autumn they go forth and rob them, but the supplies are Invariably replaced with corn or some other grain which the Indians have in plenty, so that the little harvesters are not starved out. The beans have a delicious flavor and are highly pxflzed. In the course of a few days’ hunt one Indian may gather two bushels, a few quarts being secured from each of. the underground storehouses. The Indians say that this method of gathering food from mouse hoards dates back to prehistoric times...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Portable Radiotelephone. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Portable Radiotelephone. The pocket telephone has been brought a step nearer by the assembling of the necessary radiophone apparatus into a compact unit having a weight of about 60 pounds. As a potential of only six volts to each is required to operate the rectifier and oscillator bulbs the low-capacity “Btype” batteries are dispensed with, according to an Illustrated article in the December Popular Mechanics Magazine. The low voltage required is available almost anywhere, as two six-volt batteries are easily procurable from any automobile battery service station. The new unit is especially designed for the use of motorists, yachtsmen, campers and isolated farms. Under ordinary conditions it is said that the new instrument may be depended upon to operate satisfactorily over distances of from five to fifteen miles.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Sells Gas by the Therm. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Sells Gas by the Therm. Under an act placed on the London statute book gas will In future be sold at so much a “therm” instead of so much a thousand feet. A therm is the name given to 100,000 British thermal units, one of the latter being the amount of heat absorbed in raising one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. The first distributor of gas to announce Its charges by the therm is the South Metropolitan Gas company, which from the date of reading meters for the Michaelmas quarter will charge 21 cents a therm. The gas Is declared to contain 550 British thermal units in each cubic foot.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Calm Level. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

The Calm Level. I have seen the sea lashed into fury and tossed into spray, and its grandeur moves the soul of the dullest man; but remember it is not the billows, but the calm level of the sea, from which all heights and depths are measured. When the storm has passed, and the hour of calm settles on the ocean, when the sunlight bathes Its smooth surface, then the astronomer and the surveyor take the level from which to measure terrestrial heights and depths. Wheu the emotion of the hour has subsided, we shall find that calm level of public opinion below the storm, from which the thoughts of a mighty people are to be measured, and by which their final action will be determined. —James A. Garfield.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
THE NEW PARTNER [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

THE NEW PARTNER

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
New Pictures by Radio. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

New Pictures by Radio. : ‘Very interesting and very important,” is tlie way Marconi recently expressed himself regarding the transmission of photographs by radio. It appears that several systems of this kind are being worked out at present. “I have not followed the experiments, but I know it can be done,” continued Marconi. “Pictures were sent over telegraph wires several years' ago, and what can be done by wire can be done by wireless. It will be of great interest to watch the progress made. The two chief uses to which the discovery can he put are the quick transmission of photographs for newspaper and police purposes.” Scientific American.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Goat Disclosed Rich Mine. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Goat Disclosed Rich Mine. A mountain goat recently was responsible for the discovery of what is believed to be one of the most valuable mines in British Columbia, which had been hunted by prospectors for years, after rich float ore had been found, A. Finn was hunting mountain goats high above timber line. He had trailed an animal for miles when it came out on a glacier and stood in full view against the sky on a pinnacle of ice. Finn's rifle cracked and the goat fell dead down a steep precipice and rolled several hundred feet. Its body fetched up near the foot of the glacier and when Finn reached it he found it had dislodged a massive rock beneath which the long-searched-for vein lay exposed.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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