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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

DELLA MARTIN Continued from page 8. Lord was always there with him and me. Of course, we had to work hard. Seems I was always cooking and washing. I never did any sewing, just wasn't enough time. Never worked on any public jobs either. With 13 children to take care of, there wasn't no time for that either." "I have lived in this little house for neigh onto 45 years. Seven of my children were born here. Edgar and I were married 52 years before he passed away on August 18, 1980. It's lonely without him, but I still try to go on. My youngest son and his wife live with me now. I stay busy. On weekends, this little house is filled with the children and grandchildren. I have 29 grandchildren and 7 great-grand-children. The children still like my cooking. They say I fix the best mountain cabbage ever made. Sweet potato cobbler is one daughter's favorite. Everybody goes for my old timey fried apple pies. The children still like my pinto beans and head for the bean pot when they come home. I...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 EARLY VIRGINIA RAILROADS Continued from page 1. would connect with the Atlantic and Mississippi railroad. He began construction at Harrisonburg in 1880 and by late 1881 Finney's crews had completed the line to Lexington. He had advance crews working on the road bed from Salem northward to Lexington. In fact, stone culverts still remain and can be seen today in the Cloverdale area. In the meantime a second company, which was first named the Virginia Valley Railroad and was organized by Philadelphia Capitalists, had laid out and had started construction on a railroad beginning at Hagerstown, MD where it connected with the Pennsylvania Railway Co., and was to also connect with the A. and M. at Salem, VA. These two railroads would compete with each other, serve the same areas and parallel each other with only 5 to 25 miles apart. Two things happened in 1881. First, a group of citizens offered the Valley Railroad Co. a substantial sum of money to c...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

EARLY VIRGINIA RAILROADS Continued from page 10. tion of the railroad was out of use for 10 or 12 days. The N&W management within a few hours assembled at the site a large group of officials, with work trains and track crews from both east and west division points. Mr. W. A. Turner was assistant chief Bridge Engineer and was brought from Roanoke to oversee the planning and restoration of the bridge to service. He and his assistants soon drew up a plan to build up a scaffold of log beams, ties and cross members from the bottom of the gorge and then place a temporary track and platform on top from which the work train and crew could work to bring the steelbridge back into alignment and reset it on the bearing plates. A work crew foreman named Jim Shaw enjoyed the reputation of being one of the best cribing foremen on the system. At this time, he was approaching retirement age. He had much experience in building bridges and trestles. He was sent for and brought to the site....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 np* • m lizzie Too An Excerpt From: "Old Cold Mountain Tales" ABOUT THE AUTHOR Maryon Wood Harper has lived almost all of her life within view of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. A wife, mother and grandmother, Mrs. Harper is proud of her mountain ancestry and has written this book to keep the family's many-told tales alive in today's world. Mrs. Harper is a retired teacher and lives in Amherst County, Virginia. Copies of "Old Cold Mountain Tales" are currently stocked by Lynchburg, Virginia area bookstores and may also be ordered through any bookstore or directly from the publishers: Bargara Press, P.O. Box 3131, Lynchburg, VA 24503. The price of the hardback, illustrated book is $13.75. When ordering from publisher please add $1.50 for postage/ handling (add .55# sales tax for Virginia residents). Please enclose payment with order. "Tizzie Too," called Ella Sue Tomlin, "you come here and get this spoiled rotten calf out of my flower bor...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Glendale Springs, North Carolina Milepost 259 Blue Ridge Parkway. All The Blue Ridge Has To Offer Awaits You Here! 8 i 1. NORTHWEST TRADING POST g<* 6. GLENDALE SPRINGS BAKERY (919) 982-2545 (919) 982-2103 hH 1 E _ Sbk h h 2. LEE'S MOUNTAIN HOUSE RESTAURANT sents a picturesque setting for those 7. RACCOON HOLLAR CAMPGROUND (919) 982-3286 who enjoy an escape to a place like ( 919 ) 932-2706 MB the one where Grandma's memor- ■ n *—......., . les were made. A visit here is like * * T* iff =®£ 4 Wrf fi fH "If" Si opening an old fashion trunk filled a^jrfflgifab % - A with pleasant memories. We invite ■ *'■ *PB| ~~ _..'%M| you to visit and savor a nostalgic I —r9HH| place that will live in your hearts ijwH and minds forever. '' 3. THE PLACE THAT TIME FORGOT 8- ZALOO'S CANOES (919) 982-9040 (919) 246-3066 r ■>. N Glendale Springs Mountain "Mini" Vacation Hj HOLY TRINITY ') Completely outfitted canoe trip -all equipment, transportation and box lunch CHURCH 2) Comforta...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 The Mail Box Dear Susan: I would like to renew my parents' and my subscription to The Mountain Laurel. I have especially enjoyed reading Elizabeth's Journal. It's such a shame most of the young people today are not interested in such descriptive writing of a young girl more than a century ago. The Cooley's have contributed a great deal to all your readers by letting us share in their history. We enjoy your articles on crafts and "old-timey" recipes. I would enjoy seeing more stories from some of our senior citizens on their childhood and growing up in the mountains. Thank you all so much for a thoroughly enjoyable magazine. Dear Editor: Would you please send me your special 32 page collection of the Backroads Tours. I have enclosed $2.75. My husband and I try to get away once a month, just to take your tour. We have very busy careers, and really enjoy our mountain tours and getting away. You help to show us a very special way of enjoying natur...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

TH"F PFRFIhPT PT APTH 1"1 car careen t^tui X 111j X Julvl I ;v/ X 1 Ij/iv/ ■ «———™ —— I FOR A SLOWER PACF H ■ A x t ▼ iJiv A x g , rtwwc? mwwte : <m J iDOWS OF DAN, VIRGINIA [RESTAURANT \ i September of 1985, we will be 4MH observing our 134 th year. W 16. PARKWAY CAR CARE IrV' f ll 1 "1 WE HAVEN'T CHANGED A LOT SINCE JAMES REYNOLDS OPENED THE FIRST < j \ #1 POST OFFICE IN HIS HOME ON SEPTEMBER 17, 1851. THE AIR IS *** I I STILL FRESH, THE WATER IS STILL PURE AND THE FOLKS ARE FRlEND"^at's P ro 9 re ®®J TRY WHALE SR 614 r ._i FIRE, WIND, LIGHTENING & 1§ 2 Z LIVESTOCK PROTECTION 15# MEADOWS OF DAN FOOD MARKET p j 4 *** A.M. Barnard, V. President J.F. Underwood, Genera 1 Agent ' • SPORTSWEAR' -f v JK:::'L. ||J w MAD !•: ICE 4. PARKWAY MEADOWS DAN BEAUTY SALON Highway 58 and the PEyyiJHHH MAJOR APPLIANCES RIIIP RIHpP P^rkWPlV mfff. BP Bjjg *""*t"' r )'' WATER & HEATING SYSTEMS Aj ' AUV AVAU 6 V/ 1 «J. JY Wd J SALES AND SERVICE 1 11 H ITAIN ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 TIZZY TOO Continued from page 12 Zeke Tomlin how much he's growed. He's a contrary critter 'cause his maw wouldn't raise him and I've had to do it." "So you're one of the Tomlin twins. How is your dear little sister?" "She's comin down with the measles," answered Tizzie Too, crossing two grubby fingers behind her back, but keeping a firm hold on the halter with her other hand. "Too bad, too bad," said the Reverend Carson, shaking his head and his reins. "Tell your maw and paw I'll be by to see them soon," and he rode on. Starlet didn't give Tizzie Too a chance to think how she would explain the measles when this visit occurred but struck out at a brisk rate into what was the heart of Caseytown. Here some houses were less than a mile apart and the blacksmith shop was in clear view of the General Store & Post Office. The one-room schoolhouse was so close to thechurch that if the choir and the pupils had ever been singing at the same ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Cider Run © COPYRIGHT 1985 In the early fall of 1935 I made my first trip to the Cider Mill with my Grandad. I had waited patiently for as long as I could remember for my Grandad to ask me to go to the Cider Mill nestled between the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the steep rise of Calf Mountain northeast of Waynesboro, Virginia. I was 9 years old on December 23, 1934 and I was much bigger than either of my two older brothers so I had a strong feeling that this would be the year when I would go to the Cider Mill with my dad and grandad. Although the fishing was good in South River and my two brothers wanted me to help them dam up the creek that ran through the farm to make a swimming hole, I never left my grandad's side after school was out for the summer. In late June he finally told me I could go to the mill as soon as the apples were ready. I wouldn't have to watch my two brothers climb up on the high wagon seats beside my dad and grandad and wave as they pulled out wit...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 Country Living-1850-1900 Prior to, and for over a quarter of a century after, 1900, farmers had to raise their food to feed the family year round. They raised hogs and cured the meat in winter to have through summer months. This included hams to eat, bacon to season vegetables and grease to make gravy. Other meats like beef and mutton were used in winter. In the summertime, all men and boys were good hunters. There was plenty of wild game - deer, quail (bob white), squirrels, rabbits and fish in the rivers. Anytime people wanted a mess of wild game, they went in the forest and killed what they could use in a day or two, or the stream for a mess of trout. Squirrels, pheasants and quail made good dumplings and gravy. They fixed them like stewed chicken. Most everybody raised chickens, so they were handy food. People raised fryers during the summer and used eggs of older hens. People kept cows and had plenty of milk. With this milk, they churned ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Proudly Presenting Bp PARKWAY PLANTATION P J , -sJtt dN^i A prestige showplace and a golfer's dream in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Step from f gH your door to the greens of the exciting hole Olde Course the SsSsBK "aßasi Only 6 available All completely furnished HWII96BBI|*S «*-*■ **' - ' " w '" ' Ulttl 'i'" *l2 000 f ft $56 900 *®W !! ' - 1 -M- * ' b mmt& ttw<* 38$®? •* Si ff 17,000 plus sq. ft. - $74,900 sSilaSbjlff. J-«M *"• "*' "*" I 24,000 plus sq. ft. - $89,900 pL Air conditioned includes Queen Anne ]■£*' style formal dining furniture, linens, ■ { m > Two to four bedroom townhouses feature fireplaces, two to three baths, den with wet bar, individual patios - All comfort - All seasons! Centrally located to golf, skiing, swimming, tennis, horseback riding, hiking and fishing-Easy access to 1-77,Rt. 58 and Blue Ridge Parkway mtm View of lake and golf course from townhomes For information call : 703-236-5171 (OFFICE) Cox Realty 703-774-2566 972 E. S...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 TIZZY TOO Continued from page 10. pins and led a subdued Starlet up to the porch. Here Aunt Minnie sat in the rocker, her small body shaking with laughter, mopping the tears from her eyes with her aprori. "I'm sorry, Aunt Minnife and Uncle Zeke," said Tizzie Too, trying to wipe the tears and sweat from her face with her sleeve. "I didn't mean to cause so much trouble." "Never mind, child," gasped Aunt Minnie. "I haven't had such a good laugh since the night your Uncle Zeke went out to shoot a possum in the henhouse and fell in the watering trough, gun and all." "I sure wish I'd had a camera to take a pitcher of your calf wearing your Aunt Minnie's underwear. They fitted him better than they do her," and Uncle Zeke went off into another spell of laughing. He put a chew of tobacco on Starlet's nose and fastened the halter back tightly. "What on earth did you do to get your clothes such a mess?" Ella Sue asked Tizzie Too, as she dragged herself i...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Before we started down the mountain for home, Grandad reminded Dad to stay off the hard Macadam road as much as possible. The big wide steel tires on the wagons caused them to vibrate rapidly on the hard surfaced roads and this wasn't good for the cider. Grandad led the way down the mountain and when we reached the Macadam road he kept to the shoulder of the road as much as possible. We were two miles from home and on a gentle downhill slope of Macadam road when I heard a dull explosion on my dad's wagon. I looked back and saw that the explosion had scared the mules and Dad was having a hard time holding them back. The two big mules had their ears pointed forward and were partially rearing up and jerking their heads down trying to get the bridle bit between their teeth. Dad was standing up, leaning back, sawing back and forth on the reins to keep the bits far back in their jaws. The two Belgians became nervous and great ripples ran from their wide muscled backs from their shoulders ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 JOHN HAYES HOLLOW In mid-summertime, we would get most of our work in the field finished so, until fall, it would be a time when we youngsters could go fishing, swimming or just work at making games.around the farm. There was never any money to buy bikes, wagons or toy trucks, not even kits, so we made our own wagons and other toys. One of our favorite toys was called a flutter mill. My brother and I would set out to see how many flutter mills we could put in the stream that ran through our farm. A flutter mill was a small water wheel of sort, made from a limb of a tree and two small boards. We would find a straight limb of a dogwood about 14 inches long and two boards a little thicker than a knife blade and one inch wide, about six or eight inches long. OLD PHOTOS He «V BE « |H * AiP x *** jjpß K WEBS* f % m - >- » «C ■&:. mi I ' vmCHL ] BUEIb. .Wr ■F | ;**& i,v • I '( W I s I This old photograph was recentl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

CIDER RUN Continued from page 21. Grandad got his foot on the brake handle as we swept by the house and the big rear wheels were dragging as we neared the barn. The Belgians slid to a stop at the barn door. I jumped off the wagon and looked back. The two mules were casually drinking from a watering trough about a hundred feet from the farm house. I couldn't see Dad so I started running toward his wagon, then I saw him. He was between the mules dipping his head in and out of the watering trough like a dickey bird. I noticed that Dad's wagon was empty and the only cider that Grandad had was in the two small kegs. I waited for my Grandad to explode. While Dad and I walked the mule team up behind the Belgians, Grandad went to the back porch and got the old porcelian covered drinking dipper, then came back and turned one of the kegs on its side and knocked the bung out. He filled the dipper with cider and gave it to Dad. Grandad went back to the Belgians and stroked their heads and patte...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 © COPYRIGHT 1985 Down home on the farm, Grandma's kitchen was the hub of activity for the farm and the center around which the family functioned. It was not a kitchen per se such as one might find in the city. In fact it was almost as large as the average city apartment and held most of the accouterments essential to every day living. Throughout life, when the going gets tough, I have gotten a measure of comfort and solace just from remembering my lovable grandparents and their unforgettable kitchen. Just inside the doorway that led onto the back porch, someone had built a crude but sturdy shelf that held a pail of water with a tin dipper, a dish of homemade lye soap and a tin basin. A towel, possibly made from a salt sack or some other coarse material, hung over this shelf, acting as a reminder to anyone, entering that they were expected to wash before coming in, particularly if they had any intention of eating some of Grandma's sumptuous foo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

BACKROAj!iP^ BACKROADS Continued from page 28. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total distance we've traveled from our point of beginning to that point on our tour The numbers in parentheses () indicate the distance from the last turn or point of interest that we passed. 00.0 (00.0) Beginning at the intersection of US Highway 221 and Route 100 in Hillsville, we go north on Rt. 100 toward Sylvatus. 06.6 (6.6) We are now entering the small community of Sylvatus, Virginia. 06.8 (0.2) On the hill to our left is Sylvatus Elementary School. 07•3 (0.5) At this point we will turn left on state road 750. 07.6 (0.3) Here we are still on state road 750, but the pavement ends and the road is now gravel. o#. 3 (0.7) This beautiful twostory white farmhouse on the left belongs to Mr. & Mrs. Howard E. Dalton, who have lived here for 49 years. Mrs. Dalton believes the house is somewhere around 200 years old and it was originally a log house when the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 25. « *X%fc ■ ■ >S The Shot Tower was built by Thomas Jackson, an English immigrant, who was born on Nov. 8, 1762. In about 17&5 he came to America to become associated with the lead mines in Austinville, Virginia. In 1807, when Jackson built the Tower, he and David Pierce were joint owners of the mines. Mr. Jackson operated the Shot Tower from 1807 until his death in 1824- The Tower was donated to the Commonwealth of Virginia by the Lead Mines Ruritan Club & opened to the public in 1968. In 1981, it was designated a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. During the summer months, the park is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. If you want to tour the inside of the Tower, there is an admission fee - SI.OO for adults, $.75 for children, and $.50 per person in groups of 10 or more. Brochures are available concerning the hist...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 26. who is now the present owner. In 1954 the mansion joined the more than 1,100 entries on the Virginia Landmarks Register. Jim Chitwood, Dr. Chitwood's son, gave me a personal tour of the mansion and grounds and provided much information pertaining to the history of this beautiful old mansion and the Graham family The mansion is on private property, however, and not open to the public, so please don't go on the property without first getting permission from either Dr. James Chitwood or his son. 22.1 (0.1) Here we will turn left and continue on road 619. 22.2 (0.1) From here you can still see the Graham Mansion, and also an old grainery on the property. Jim Chitwood, Jr. and his wife live in the farmhouse adjacent to the mansion. 24.0 (1.8) At this point the gravel road ends & the road is now paved. We are still on 619. 24.7 (0.7) The old building in the field to our left is the old Graham's Forge Mill, & the brick building was ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

y HEART OF TOE BLUE RIDGE TAcuniah w»"' A. Copyright 1985 Laurel Publications Inc. September j 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life PAGE 28 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month our BACKROADS Tour will be in Wythe County, Virginia, except for the first few miles, which are in Carroll County. We'll pass beautiful old farmhouses, historical landmarks, the New River and other mountain scenery that you don't want to miss. From beginning to end, our tour will cover 50.7 miles and will take a minimum of lV 2 hours to drive. If you plan to spend time at the Shot Tower Historical State Park and the Wytheville National Fish Hatchery, I woul...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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