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Title: Liverpool Herald Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 29,019 items from Liverpool Herald, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE LOST ATLANTIS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

THE LOST ATLANTIS. The legend of the .lost Atlantis relates to an island or continent believed to have ex- isted in part of what is now the Atlantic Ocean, opposite the month of tho Mediter- ranean sea. Mr. A. S. Skidmoro, of Wol- verhampton, writes :-Tho statements re- specting Atlantis made by ancient writers went to show that Atlantis was densely populated with a civilised and educated people, who carried on a considerable maritime trade. They were believed to have founded colonies on the shores of tho Medi- terranean, and in other parts, and to have been the authors of the civilisations of Egypt, Phoenicia, Aesyria, Mexico, Peru, etc Even the Chinese woro believed lo havo derived, perhaps their origin, and cnrtuinly their arts and sciences from the Atlanteans. Atlantis was rich in metals and productive of grain and fruits, aod abounded in springs, and the inhabitants were skilled in metal work- ing and the building arts. Some of their temples are described as having boen oovered...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SMOKERS, READ THIS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

SMOKERS, REáJD THIS. Smokers may be interested to know what it is they inhale in the fumes of the fragrant weed that soothes their irritable nerves. The old-fashioned idea was that tobaooo smoke consisted mainly of carbonic acid and ammonia, but we are now told that it is made up of prussic acid, an alkaloid?-* ving 'a delightful odour, but dangerous to b , and as poisonous as nicotine, sinoe a J of one-twentieth of a grain will desti vmmal life,' and of aromutio prinoiple aa yet und«rterminea,' but not bad a ./ prin oipleB go, inasmuoh as they aron ooisonous. The aotive element of tobac smoke is nicotine, but it is contended that this fresh noxious element, which is dubbed 'oollidiue,* has for some time been overlooked. When tobaooo is poor in niootine, it may yet be most poisonous, for then the 'oollidine' in it will operate with vigour on the smoker.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCIENCE. WHEN WILL PEOPLE LIVE TO BE TWO HUNDRED. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

! BOnOL WHEN WILL PEOPLE LIVE TO BB ! TWO HUNDRED. . This will take place in, the thirty-ninth century, if we are to believe the statistician. Ic is shown clearly that men and women, speaking generally, live at least three years longer nowadays than they did forty years ago. It is easy to see, according to the above figures, if the ratio continues, and taking the average of to-day to be, say, fifty, that in the year 3897 we shall have a race of Britishers who will be considered at a hun ar ed, in tho prime of life at 160, of an aver- age age to be marked by death at 200, and old at 260.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DEATH PROVEN IN THE EYE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

DEATH PROVEN IN THE ETE. A famous London physician is about to communicate to the medical world a dieoovery that he believes bound to prove a boon to humanity and to rob death of one of its terrors. He has found how, he says, to read death in the human eye, to tell by the appearenoe of veins and arteries whether lifo has de parted or a spark yet remains, and to tell it with absolute certainty. For centuries man has been haunted with tho fear that ho will wake up in the tomb to a roalisiag sense of his awful position. The physician mentioned sayn he notioed that tho oyo of tho dead immediately after dissolution took on an entirely different and unmistakable aspect. Within a few moments tho distinction botwoen tho colour of the blood in the arteries and the veins entirely disappeared. In faot, BO rapidly does the change take place that the doctor found that in many oases the phenomena occurred ab- solutely simultaneously with death.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOME SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

SOME SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES. To stop bleeding from a severe ont, tis a little flour on the wound. If you have been scalded by steam, drenoh the part with cold water. A raw egg, well-beaten and thickened with pulverised sugar, will relieve hoarseness and tickling in the throat. A delioate ohild or an invalid anxious to gain strength and woight will be greatly benefited by an occasional frictioning of the entire body with olive oil after a warm bath. To relieve asthma, soak blotting or tissue paper in strong saltpetre water and burn it at eight in the sloeping-room. The following is highly recommended for rheumatism : Equal parts of cream of tartar and saltpetre; half a teaspoonful of the mixture to be divided into three doses, and one dose taken three times a day.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ASK [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

ASK Mr. W. A. Jones, Uralla, N.S.W., who writes on September 7th, : 1896 : -I have, much pleasure in sending you thia testimony. About seven years ago 1 was seized with a languid feeling, my stomach would reject all food, I could not sleep at night, my mouth was always parched, espeoially at night ; the least noise would cause irritation of the nerves; tho slightest cold air seemed to go right through me. I also suffered with pal- pitation cf the heart to such an extent as to become alarmed. I had pains in the region of the liver ; I became very nervous, and also suffered from shortness of breath. I con* suItod doctors in this town and Armidale; their medicino would give me slight relief but nothing permanent. J was also treated by doctors in Sydney and Newcastle with the same result. I became so weak I oould soaroely stand, and despaired of ever regain- ing my health. I continued in this state for three years. Heading one of your books I was struck by some of the statements of some...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO FRESHEN A BLACK GOWN. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

TO FRES BEN A BLACK GOWN. It is a great help to a fastidious girl with .a small allowanoe of pin money to know bow to take oare of clothing, especially how to keep a black gown fresh and neat. An American girl taught me several, useful «lassons on taking spots oat and freshening iip laces and black gowns. To take spots out of black goods she used the following : Tho yolk of an egg in a half pint of tepid rain water with a teaspoonful ?of spirits of camphor and a heaping tea- spoonful of powdered borax. This recipe will remove spots so that they will not re- turn ao soon as the cloth is dry. ..ti. (J To freshen hlaok lace : Lay the lace on a 'dean board, moisten with a pieoe of blaok silk dipped in a weak solution of borax, pay a teaspoonful to a pint of warm wa'er. ''While damp, cover with a pieoe of hlaok eilk or cloth and iron. It will look as if a professional laee-oleaner had deaned, it.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENGLISH LETTER. I. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

ENGUJÏSH LETTER. The lateBt novelty in dress materials is a cashmere cloth of fine or thiok texture. In dolioate tints the lighter quality is adaptable for evening wear, while the heavier make is suitable for visiting costumes. The new doth is BB light and Hoft as velvet, and it has a rich bloom upon its surface. It may be -?purchased in shades of tan and biscuit, igreen, brown, blue, grey, black, and Danish ?rod. Much of the last named colour will be worn in autumn, so much so that whenever a touch of it eau be harmoniously and , artistically introduced upon dark gowns and lats and bonnets it will be used. The brighter shade requires, however, to bo sparingly used, and tb on with a liberal supply ol good taste, or the effect beoomos too pro nonnoed to bo becoming. iï. Where tho material of an evening costume is of rioh silk, satin, brocade or velvet, the plain skirt, in all its beoomingness, is gener- ally adopted. For thinner fabrics tho newer fashions show skirts that are daintil...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LUCKY AMBASSADORS' WIVES. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

LUCKY AMBASSADORS* WIVES. Contrary to general belief, wives ' of am Hbassadors are offloial personages with strictly defined prerogatives, precedence, and 'Tank. ' Many of the privileges are very quaint. Thus, for instance, when one gives birth to a child daring the term of the husband's mission, it is customary for the sovereign to whose court the husband is accredited t? aot .AB sponsor to the infant. In England wives of the ambassadors have ? * >T>een the frequent cause of difficulty both at .court and in Booiety. At onetime all the wives of earls abstained from coming to . . court, so as not to yield precedence to tho wives of ambassadors, while in the early part of Queen Victoria's reign the duohesses troee in arms at the idea of making way for those ladies. But they were forced to yield, as not only the ambassadors, but also the ambassadors' .wives, are looked upon as representing the 'personality of their sovereigns, and it would be impossible for any foreign ruler to w...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

DO YOU SUFFER ? ARE YOU AFFLICTED WITH INDIGESTION, BACKACHE, TIRED ACHING LIMBS, LIVER COMPLAINT. LASSITUDE, OR Any complaint arising: from an impover- ished nervous system ? If so CLEMENTS TONIC IS A QUICK PROMT AND SURE CURE. IT DOES NOT MERELY ALLAY THE SYMPTOMS BUT EFFECTS A PERMANENT AND POSITIVELY LASTING CURE. The Hit ..of the.. Season.... is made by Ayer's Sarsa- parilla. At thia season, when warm and de- bilitating days are with us, there is noth- ing like Ayer's Sarsaparilla to put new lifo into the slug g i s h system. It sweeps away the dullness, lack of appe- tite, languid- ness, and pain, as a broom sweeps away cobwebs. It does not braco up. It builds up. Its benefit is lasting. Do you feel run »down? Take AYER'S Sarsaparilla. . FRBPARED BY OR. J. £ AYER a CO., Lowell, Käu.,U.S. A. Ayer** JPill; Mild but Effective, THE COMMITTEE OF THE TWENTY NINTH ANNUAL DRUIDS' GALA HAVE pleasure in informing their patrons in N.S.W. that the usual Art Union con- nected with the Drui...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CORNSTALK IN BRITAIN AND WHAT HE SAW THERE. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

A CORNSTALK 1 IN BRITAIN AND WHAT HE SAW THERE. [By VV. T. C.] All went well until a wayside inn was reached, when the animal-came to a sudden halt. "Billy always stops suddint here, sir," tho owner explained, " won't move a peg, sir, till he gets his swill." Well, he speedily drained oiF his swill from a large earthenware bo'vl, and, after " remembering the ostler," we continued our ride. Bub our progress now became so slow that I ven- tured an opinion about it to tho driver. Billy be lively enough d'recly, sir, never fear, you'll get the worth of your 'blunt,' sir." We are now corning to the foot of a slight descent, as he was speaking, and before he had ceased Billy had broken into a smart trot. At the top of the rise he started he hawing and pig-jumping. "Hang on, Myrier, hang on, sir, it's alright, he's only on the frisk and wants 'is 'ead." Well, he got "'is 'ead" and went down the hill at a canter that was decidedly bumpy and bewildering. The coster, now all perspiration, tug...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHORT STORY THE COLONEL'S CASE. I. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

:f f:: :v 8ïï(Kra Sf aa? ;r;r';íw:: , v THE COLONEL'S CASE, i. . THE Colonel was fifty, and he looked it. A tall, lean man, bis bronzed faoe and grey hair made him appear older thau his /year* ; but he carried himself well, as peeatne a soldier, and thirty years' service in the East had told but little on his iron con- stitution. He was still in the prime of life, yet life seemed to have but little charm for him. His thoughtful faoe was rarely bright- ened by a emile, and his eyes, though keen, were grave. "E's an old man afore his time, ie the Colonel !* as old Grover, the gardener, said ; and he, if anybody, ought to know. For Grover had worked about the place, man and hoy, for nearly eeventy years ; he had been taken on first in old Mr. Travis's time, the Colonel's grandfather ; be had been raised to the dignity of head-gardonor by the late master, the Colonel's uncle ; and now that the Colonel had inherited the old place, he had many a tale to tell of the spirited, fair haired c...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PIC-NIC RACES AT SMITHFIELD. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

PIO-NIC RACES AT SMITHFIELD. RACES, promoted by the genial host of The Cricketer's Arms Hotel, Smithfield (Mr. J. H.. Stan- field), wero held in Kenyon's Paddock on Saturday afternoon last and attracted about 250 spectators. The principle events were well contested and created , a good deal of interest. Tho ubiquitous " bookies" appeared to bc doing good business, ns also did the j publicaifs booth presided over by Mrs. Stanfield, j Host Brewer (Liverpool) manipulated the starting ?< machine and the officials generally gave every satis- | faction-the decision of tho committee in the Handicap Trot, resulting in the disqualification of Two Bob, being justly applauded. Appended nre the results i - Flying Handicap-Kitty S.H. 1, Neil Gow 2. Pony Handicap, 13'1 and under-Charley 1, Nancy 2. Galloway Handicap, li'2 and under-Miss Priam 1, Repenter 2. Handicap Trot-Polly 1, Trixy 2. Two Bob, who passed the post flz-st, was disqualified. Easter Handicap-Kitty S.H. 1, Neil Gow 2. H...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

Impurities of the Blood Until these purifying Pill« have had a fair trial, let no on« kc longer oppressed with the notion that his malady is in- curable. A fevr doses will remove all disordered actions, rouse thc torpid liver, reliare the obstructed kidneys, cleansa impure blood, and confer on evary Junction healthful vigour. They work a thorough purification throughout the whole system, without disordering thc natural action of any organ. Indigestion, Bilious Complaints, and Sick Headache No organ in the human body is BO liable to disorder as thc iiver. Remaraber that when nausea, flatulency, or acidity on thc stomach warn ti» that digestion is not proceeding prop.-rly, Holloway's Pills give strength to every organ, speedily'remove nil cuines of indigestion, inspissated bile, and sick headache, and effect a permanent cure. x Weaknoss and Debility. In cases of debility, languor, and nervousness, generated by excess af any kind, whether mental or ph y neal, the etfccls of those Pills...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

POSTAL INFORMATION. MAILS are despatched from Liverpool Post Office <laily (Sundays exoopted), as follows: Sydney, Parramatta, and Gledfield, 9'30 a.m. Bringelly, Moorbank, Bonnyrigg, Preston's, and Hoxton. Park, ll a.m. . ¡Sydney, 12-30 p.m. Campbelltown, Camden, Narellan, Granville, and . T.P.O., at 5-30 p.m. ..'«.. Sydney, Parramatta, and Granville, at 9-30 p.m. On every Tuesday and Saturday mails are des- patched for Holdsworthy and Eckersley a 12 noon. On every Saturday night a mail is despatched to Travelling P.O., with letters for tho Northern; and Western lines, nt.9'30. »On Sundays mails are despatched to Sydney, Parramatta, Grau ville, and Travelling P .0. at 6 p.m. M'Aies are.reoeived at the Liverpool Post Offloe tdaily (Sundays excepted), as follows : > ?Sydney, Campbelltown, and Travelling P.O. at 8 .. -A.m. ; ,. . .Moorbank, 9*45 a. m. Sydney, Parramatta, Granville, Narellan, Cam- den, 10 a.m.. Bonnyrigg, 12*45 p.m. ?? Hoxton;Park, 9 a.m. ..." .? ¡ Bringe...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

THE .. Liverpool Herald With whioh is incorporated the "Liverpool Times" and " Liverpool Mercury), Pu1)li*hed:1 Ey*ry Saturday Y'¡ " Morning, ls one ot th*. BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUMS out of Sydney, as t has a "Large and , Steadily Increasing Circulation throughout the wbp^eoJf th%| Diátriet> including Canley Vale, St. John's Park, Cabramatta. Hoxton Park, Glenfield, Bringelly, Ingleburn, Minto, Moorbank, Bonnyrigg, and the town of Liverpool. Li . -;-:-o--"-? It contains the LAT pSt^K't'F'? ! .A: right ap-tb'titeUmp ot publication.* -:-O-r-r Rate of Subscription. - Payable in advance per quarter " "'... . 2s 6(3 If booked, per quarter ... 3s 3d Scale of Charges ' for , Advertising. For the first inch ... 3s Od Special terms will be : made for standing advertisements. Notice to .Correspondents. All Communications foi* insertion- invtho Cotumns of this journal must be acoompanied with the : real; name and address.of the writers, not . necessarily for publication, but as a guarauteo o...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

THE ROYAL ROAD r- to SAFE AND EASY TEETHING Is the prompt use of < Ashton arid Parsons'* MATRIOARIA INFANTS' POWDERS. Thousands of Mothers oan testify to this and their words are endorsed by Clergymen, Missionaries, Doctors, Nurses and Dealers from all parts of the' World. SUPPLIED BY ROYAL COMMANDS To members i of the BBITXSH aod. FOREIGN , BOYAL- FAMILIES. They cool the; gums, comfort the child, produce a natural calm refreshing sleep; and render teething quite easy. Guaranteed Perfectly'Harmless; SLEEPLESS NIGHTS PREVENTED. We never get a Vestless night. Royland Common, near'Barnsley, January 2nd; 1890. , Messrs. Ashton Jk Parsons,. London. Please let me have another .large box of Infants' j Powders. Could you let mb have'them to sell ? I ! have let several people have some, and 1 think we ! could soil a good many. ¡ I believe they have-been a great benefit to my baby ; we never get a restless night with her, and she is catting teeth. Yours truly, (Mu.) A. KEELEY." The...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ORIGIN OF 'FOOLSCAP.' [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

THE ORIGIN OF ' FOOLSCAP.' . * Nearly everybody knows what 'foolsoap* paper is, but there are probably few people who know just bow it carno to bear that name/ said a large wholesale stationer to the newspaper man. * In order to increase ¿is revenues, Charles I. granted certain privileges, amounting1 to monopolies, and among these was the manufacture of writing paper, the exclusive right of which was sold to certain parties, who grew wealthy and enriched the Government at the expense of those who wsra obliged to uso such paper. At that time all English paper bore the Royal coat-of-arms in water marka. But when the Parliameut under Cromwell came into power, it made sport of this law in every possible manner, and among other indig- nities to the memory of Charles it was ordered that the Royal arms be removed from the paper, . and that a fool's oap and bells should be used as a substitute. When the Rump Parliament was pro- rogued these wer9 also removed ; but paper of the size of the P...

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SKETCHER. MAKING TEETH IN STEEL SAWS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

-^ I MAKING TEETH IN STEEL SAWS. Steel platea for saws are prepared from ingots carefully made to secure uniform quality, and, after being rolled, they are slit into shapes designed for the different kinds of saws- Hand-saws in England have .- the teeth pointed from the handle, while in Asiatio countries and ia Greece they are made with teeth pointed the other way. The latter must be operated by pulling them, the former by pushing. For delicate work, and where vory fine sows are used, tho Eastern sawi s tho best. The space between the teeth of circular -saws is hollowed out, and resembles very much the bend of a fish-hook. This pre- caution prevents them from oloorging. Tho Orientals also differ from us in sotting the teeth of the saw. They form a group of a dozen ono way, and the next group the other, while we alternate one on one side, the next on the other. There aro saws made so small as not to exoeed one-fiftieth of an in oh in width, and less than that in thickness.

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LADIES' COLUMN. BEAUTIFUL HANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Liverpool Herald — 16 April 1898

-*r> --.¿r BEAUTIFUL HANDS. ' Painters award the palm of beauty in the .-.matter of hands to tho women of Ireland. The hande of Irish girls, it appears, most . nearly fulfil all tho artistio requirements. English hands, say thesa connoisseurs, are too plump and fleshy, aa a rule, while those of American women are too long* and narrow. The fingers of German girls are too short, and the palms of the hands too broad. Next to the hands of Iriah beauties aro placed those of the daughters of Poland. French, Italian, and Spanish girls are all credited "with indifferently good hands, though there -are more beautifai hands to be found in France and Italy than in Spain. Parisian ladies are*popularly behoved to hive prettier hands than the women of any other town or « country, but this reputation is not owing to any particular beauty of form, but to the fact that Parisiennes take more pains: with their hands than other women, and have ^carried the art of improving upon nature to perfection....

Publication Title: Liverpool Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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