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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Why do Widows Fascinate? AN ARTICLE FOR LADIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Why do Widows Fascinate?   AN ARTICLE FOR LADIES.   An instinctive dislike and dread of the young   and attractive widow who crosses her path is   traditional in the unmarried girl. In her she   recognises a rival whose battery of charms is   perfect. She fears her snares. She mistrusts her machinations. Deeming her a traitress, she cannot bear to trust her sweetheart out of her sight when fluttering in the distance she per- ceives the white flag of a widow's bonnet strings.   Are such rivals really superlatively danger-   ous? In many instances they are fascinating   neither naturally nor intentionally. Their hearts   are buried in their husbands' graves. Yet in   their very pathos they are hedged round with   attractions. Men who are tender and kind can-   not bear to witness a woman's sorrow without  ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A REMARKABLE INSTRUMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A REMARKABLE INSTRUMENT. —— An Italian engineer, M. Triulzi, has devised a special instrument, the cleptoscope, whereby it is possible for the crew of a submarine boat to ascertain what is progressing on the surface while submerged. It comprises a tube fitted with crystal prisms in a special manner. Severe ex- periments were carried out with the apparatus on board the submarine "Il Delphino" in the presence of the Italian Minister for Marine. Pho- tographs of objects on the surface were success- fully obtained.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A ROYAL BANQUET. DISHES PROVIDED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A ROYAL BANQUET. DISHES PROVIDED.   On the occasion of the visit of the Prince and   Princess of Wales to the City of London, the   first week in December, most elaborate arrange-   ments were made for their reception at the   banquet in their honor. The following dishes   were provided:—   84 tureens of clear turtle soup   90 dishes of fillettcd soles   112 lobster salads   12 aspics of foie gras   12 aspics of prawns   20 dishes of mousses de volailles   56 dishes of mutton cutlets   56 dishes of larks a la Rothschild   24 galantines of chicken   150 dishes of roast chicken   32 game and pigeon pies   3 sirloins of beef   24 pieces of spiced beef   54 rolled tongues   80 dishes of ham, jellies, citron, orange, pu...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MEDICAL HERO. HOW AN IRISH DOCTOR LAID DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS PATIENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A MEDICAL HERO. HOW AN IRISH DOCTOR LAID DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS PATIENTS. Under the auspices in Dublin of the president of the Royal College of Physicians (Sir C. Nixon), Dr. Myles (president of the Royal College of Sur- geons, Dublin), and others, a fund is being raised for the widow and eight children of Dr. William Smyth, of Burtonport, Donegal. In their appeal the distinguished doctors tell in simple language the history of their humble colleague's splendid devotion to duty:— "Dr. William Smyth was the medical officer to the Burtonport dispensary district, which in- cludes the island of Aranmore. On the island an epidemic of typhus fever made its appearance. Here, owing to the poverty and ignorance of the people and the insanitary state of their houses,   it was found a fruitful breeding ground, and it   was in combating this epidemic that Dr. Smyth   laid down his life, a martyr to his sense of duty. "Alone each day he rowed his boat across...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TRAINED NURSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE TRAINED NURSE. "Do you find the trained nurse very helpful?" "Very; but I had to hire two extra servants to wait on her."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANIMALS ELECTROCUTED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ANIMALS ELECTROCUTED. Deaths caused by lightning in the animal world are infrequent, or we should hear of them more often. The chief victims are sheep and cattle, which gather under trees in thunderstorms, and are consequently killed when the trees are struck. That is the case here, but in South Africa light- ning constantly destroys stock in the open. Dur- ing the war the following classes of animals have been mentioned as killed by lightning:— Horses, mules, trek oxen, sheep, and pigs. Sev- eral soldiers have been killed, their rifles pro- bably exposing them to additional danger. In a park many trees had been badly struck, and among them one not very seriously damaged, in which a pigeon was killed by the lightning in a curious way. It had made its nest on a piece of old wire netting, which the haymakers had thrown up into the tree when cutting the grass. On this platform the pigeon built its nest. After a thunderstorm in August the keeper went to the tree to ferret out rabbits. U...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF MONACO. PROBABLE SEPARATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF MONACO. PROBABLE SEPARATION.   A friend writes to the "Free Lance" from the Riviera:—"It is being said here, there, and everywhere that a serious event is impending in connection with the Prince and Princess of Monaco, and that the Princess intends taking up her permanent abode abroad. That the rela- tions between husband and wife have been more than once strained, to use the language of dip- lomacy, is matter for common knowledge. Their   temperaments are essentially dissimilar, and, in   any case, the Prince never was an easy man to   get on with. He is of a rather moody and taci- turn nature, reserved and stiff in manners, yet straightforward and honest beyond a shadow of suspicion; interested in science to the extent of equipping a vessel at his own expense (or, rather that of the people who lose money at the famous Casino) for purposes of deep-sea dredg- ing, testing ocean currents, etc.—doing all this f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AFRICAN SANITATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

AFRICAN SANITATION. Mosquitoes and malaria are to be vigorously fought in West Africa by improving the drainage, according to Major Ronald Ross. The governors of the coast have become interested in the new ideas upon sanitation, and propose to do every thing in their power to destroy the breeding places of the mosquitoes, and to guard against all forms of disease. Even without this special work, disease may be expected to diminish with the present rapid development of the country, as it did in India and Burmah after their occupation.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ACTOR AND CABBY. JEHU THOUGHT SIB HENRY IRVING MAD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ACTOR AND CABBY. JEHU THOUGHT SIR HENRY IRVING MAD. Sir Henry Irving, while filling his Brooklyn engagement, made his home at the Hotel Mar- garet on Columbia Heights, and it was his custom every pleasant afternoon to drive in Prospect Park, writes a New York correspondent. One afternoon the driver came with the usual vehicle—a closed carriage—and set out ignorant of the fact that the spare, silk-hatted old gentle- man who had climbed in was the distinguished actor. In what seemed to be a very short time for an afternoon outing, the carriage returned, and cabby came into the office looking much concern- ed. With the air of one imparting grave news, and jerking his thumb over his shoulder in the direction whither Sir Henry had disappeared, he said to the clerk:— "The old lad is dotty. Shortly after we got into the park I heard a groaning inside, then I caught the words: 'Hates any man the thing he would not kill.' At that I drove out and brought him back as quickly as possible. He wa...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Great Shakes. HOW DO YOU DO? THE HAND-SHAKE. SOMETIMES SENSIBLE, SOMETIMES SILLY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Great Shakes.       HOW DO YOU DO? THE HAND-SHAKE. SOMETIMES SENSIBLE, SOMETIMES SILLY. One of the surest and quickest ways of getting an index to a man's temperament is to study the way in which he shakes hands with you. The typical British hand-shake may be termed the grip of friendship. It is as confident as it is cordial. There is no hesitancy about it, for it is the hearty grasp of a man who, being honest himself, either does not look to encounter de- ceit or fears it not. In striking contrast to this is what you might call the dandy's dangle—for it is scarcely a hand-shake—that you observe in society draw- ings and at fashionable functions. The extreme opposite of this is the knuckle crusher—a form of grip very prevalent among the ignorant, boastful men, who think to carry all before them by bluff. This sort of man never allows you to place more than your fingers in his hand, then takes advantage of his superior leverage and plays havoc w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Complete Short Story. A LOST PARADISE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Complete Short Story. A LOST PARADISE.   Cayley, out of "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray," would have called her a black-velvet-and-white- arms woman. Physically, she was the tallest,   most statuesque, and beautiful of creatures; but she was undemonstrative, distant, and chilly as in iceberg. As for him, he was a broad-shouldered, honest- hearted chap, and probably he would have been happier with a frivolous, fluffy-haired little wife —one who would have snuggled lovingly into his arms when he came home, and been lavish of her kisses and caresses. "I sometimes wish, Edith, that you were not so cold," he said to her once. "I wish some- times you would show that you loved me a little." There was a faint smile in her eyes as she answered. "A woman's love is not always to be gauged by the number of her embraces." "Why, old girl, you are so extraordinary that I do not believe you'd be jealous even were I to make love to another woman. I wonder if you would?" "I wonde...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBMARINE VESSELS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

SUBMARINE VESSELS. —♦— Remarkable developments have been made in the construction of the two latest submarine ves- sels, "Triton" and "Espadon," for the French navy. They are of the Narval type, but M. La- beuf, the eminent naval engineer, has introduced several important improvements. In their trials these two boats attained a speed of 10 miles an hour in a 40-mile run, a hitherto unprecedented speed. A new arrangement for the supply of air, devised by Dr. Giblat, has also been requisition- ed, and by this means the "Espadon" was able to remain submerged to a depth of 50ft. for four hours without the crew experiencing the slightest ill effects.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NORTHERN ABYSSINIA. INTERESTING EXPLORATION RESULTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

NORTHERN ABYSSINIA.     INTERESTING EXPLORATION   RESULTS.   Major Austin has recently returned from his exploration tour in the north of Abyssinia, after experiencing great hardships. The result of the expedition has been the mapping out of the region between the Nasser and MBurle, a district on the Oto River, north of Lake Rudolph. By this achievement the whole region between Khartoum   and latitude 16deg. 11min. north, and between   33deg. and 36 deg. longitude is mapped out.   Major Austin found that although the region   for the most part consisted of deserts and moun-   tainous country, there were areas which could be   utilised for cultivation. One peak north of Lake   Rudolph he found was 7000 feet high. The ex-   pedition encountered storms of almost unparal- leled severity. The heavy rains either quickly entered the san...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FADS ABOUT EATING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

FADS ABOUT EATING.     Every individual has his or her theories about   eating, and many people carry out their theories   to an extent which places them in the order of   cranks (says the New York "Press"). Among   these cranks are the people who contend that   the proper way to "feed" is to live on one meal   a day. Their gastronomic apostle was Dr. George   Fordyce, the celebrated anatomist and lecturer   on chemistry. The doctor used to eat one meal   a day, and one meal only; but it was a mighty   one.     The moment the waiter announced the doc-   tor's arrival the cook put a pound and a half of   rump steak on the fire, and, to while away the   time until the steak should be properly broiled,   the waiter brought the doctor some tempting &amp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY IT DIDN'T WORK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHY IT DIDN'T WORK.   It has been necessary to tear out an expensive   marble switch board which was built in the elec-   trical power-house at "Idle Hour," Mr. W. K.   Vanderbilt's American estate in Oakdale, L. I.   Ever since the marble board was put in the   current has been erratic, says the "Electrical   Review." It was finally determined that the   trouble must be in the switchboard. A careful   investigation revealed the fact that the marble   contained a vein of iron sufficiently well de-   veloped to form an occasional short-circuit. A   new switchboard is to be constructed, and the   o!d one torn out.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARBLE IN ALASKA. AN IMPORTANT DISCOVERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MARBLE IN ALASKA.   AN IMPORTANT DISCOVERY.   J. E. Cronln, who a month or so ago returned   from Marble Creek, Prince of Wales Island, and   W. K. Sheldon, who has just joined him from   San Francisco, have some wonderful stories to   tell of the fine character of the marble to be   found at Shakan, on Prince Edward Island. The   marble is said to be equal to the best Italian   marble. Mr. Sheldon said: "When I received   samples of this marble last February, I saw   at once that it was unlike any marble now being   produced in the United States, but identical with   the marble produced in the world-famous quar-   ries of Carrara, Italy. While there are a num-   ber of profitable quarries in the United States,   and a large amount of American marble is used,   yet ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CANCELLING POSTAGE STAMPS [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

CANCELLING POSTAGE STAMPS An ingenious little machine for cancelling the stamps on letters is being tried at the London General Post-office. Formerly this was done by   hand, and was, as may be imagined, a long process. Four years ago a machine, having electricity for its motive power, was introduced, and while performing the cancellation much more expedi- tiously, the speed at which the letters could be dealt with was still limited by the capacity of the operator, who passed them through as fast as he was able. The present machine also is driven by electricity, and all the operator has to do is to face the letters in bulk towards the machine, which disposes of them at the rate of 420 a minute.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRIDGE-BUILDERS' WAGES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

BRIDGE-BUILDERS' WAGES. —♦—     An English bridge-builder with experience of life in India, gives an interesting account of the wages of coolie and other caste men who have to be drawn upon for a working force in rivet- ing, skilled workmen being very scarce. It ap- pears that all sorts and conditions of men are impressed into the work, without consideration   of their previous occupations. Whereas a black- smith is always a blacksmith in India, and the man born to a carpenter father follows the trade of his parent, in riveting any caste may be drawn upon. Accordingly there are sometimes milkmen, butlers, gardeners, and even outcasts impressed into closing the rivets in the several members of bridges, but the English bridge- builder aforementioned says that very drastic methods are practised to make capable work- men out of the material at hand. The pay   for the head riveter is about 30 cents a day; for the holder-on, 16 cents. Th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RUSSIAN SECRET POLICE IN PARIS. THREE DISTINCT SYSTEMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

RUSSIAN SECRET POLICE IN PARIS. THREE DISTINCT SYSTEMS. Prince Ourousoff, the Russian Ambassador to the French Republic, is reported to have said on a memorable occasion that he was not the real representative of the Czar in Paris, and that the Embassy in the Rue de Grenelle was nothing better than a house of call for visiting grand dukes. There is more truth in this paradox than the uninitiated would suppose. The official re- presentative of the Autocrat is in fact not his confidential agent. The task of keeping his Ma- jesty informed about the real state of affairs in France is confided to a personage who has no connection whatever with the Russian Foreign Office, but exercises the vastly more important duties of chief of the Emperor's police in Paris. I say "the Emperor's," because there are no less than three separate and distinct Russian secret police systems in the French capital. Like all the Czar's most trusted advisers (wit- ness Fredericks, von Hesse, Lamsdorff, Witte), hi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOLDING A HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

HOLDING A HORSE. A horse that cannot bend its front legs is not likely to bolt. This fact has led an ingenious gentleman, who has probably suffered from the inconvenience of not always finding a post handy for tethering his horse, to invent a fetter that will tether the animal without further appli- ances. It is a stiff piece of material, or wood, placed behind the knees of the front legs and secured round the front by a strap; or two pieces of wood can be used and connected by a lock. This effectually prevents the horse from running away. It can be used for carriage horses. You can thus lock up your horse without troubling about the stable door, and so upset the old pro- verb.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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