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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MATTERS FEMININE. SMILING FOR BEAUTY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

MATTERS EEMIN1NE. SMILING FOU 1IHAUTY. Do tho earners of your mouth natu rally droop down!' Ji' I hoy do, go and stand in front of a minor, ami prop them up with vonr tinkers over so slightly, ;ind see if your whole face ilovvs not become not only pleasanter, but. prettier. 1 think it will, for the i prettine.ss value of a pleasant expres sion is not just in its temporary light ing up a face—it ia also tho mould in which it loaves the face that counts tlio | most. Tho ugliest girl I know is one whoso discontented disposition hafi drawn down the corners of her mouth, and whoso habit of continual frowning has marked two sharp wrinkles between her oyos. In other details of appear auco she is not particularly blessed, . but without these disfigurements sho ; would bo simple ordinarily plain. With them sho is—as i beforo romarked— tho ugliest girl I know.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SKIMPS'S LITTLE JOKE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

SKIMPS'S LITTLE JOKE. I "Speaking an bantam chickens," re marked Skimps, when the conversa tion turned to poultry, "I have a hen whose eggs are so small that I put three dozen of them in a collar-box the othei day." "Give him the Ananias Club medal!" shouted the rest, in chorus. "Have any of you gentlemen money with which to back your doubts of my veracity?" "I have a couple of pounds," re plied Gaswell. "So have I," added Dukane. "Good enough! I'll cover both of those bets." "Very well. Now, show us those eggs in that collar-box." "Well, I can do it if you insist, but perhaps it may not be neces sary.',' "Of course it is necessary 1 You don't expect to win your money with out proof dp you?" "Not at all, but I merely wish to observe that it was a horse-collar-box / I put the eggs in." With some difficulty the matter was compromised, and Skimps was warn ed that the next break of the kind would cost him his life.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Snooks" or "Sevanoaks." [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

"Snooks" or "Sevanoaks." Tlioro is perhaps no more fascinating branch of etymology than tliat which is concerned with tho origins and deriva tions of names, wliethor of places or of people. Ttero is no study thai is so fruitful in interesting surprises; nud one can imagino that even tho. resentful bearers of hideous and vul gar-sounding patronymics tnay some times bo almost reconciled to their af fliction when they learn from what res pectable and euphonious originals their hated names have descended. To de monstrate to a "Mr. Snooks," for ox ample, that his ridiculous surname is a mere contraction of "Sevenoaks" is a real act of charity, and it must sure ly bo balm in Gilead to a "Mr. Mul lins" to learn that he lias a. right to claim descent from the ancient and aristocratic family of Do Moleyns. I

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMILE AND AVOID APPENDICITIS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

SMILE AND AVOID APPENDICITIS. You neod not bo operated upon for appendicitis now. You may avoid any and all attacks if you will only con tinuo to smile. This is tho solemn truth, according to the physicians of the Johns Hopkins Hospital of Balti more, and thero aro no higher auth orities in the world. Ifc is asserted that every case of ap pendicitis is. due to gloomy spirits &nd not to tho swallowing of a lemon pip or a grape seed. The surgeons toll the man with a grouch that ho is looking for apen dicitis, and that ho is sure to got it sooner or later. Worry is tho real causo which woakons the digestivo ap paratus and makos it impossible to > carry off tiny irritating substance that may havo boon swallowed. Tho more you laugh the healthier you aro and tho moro sure you aro of avoiding this and other operations, they claim. Tho worrying man bolts his food without proper mastication, and this is known to bo one of tho primary causes of appendicitis and other dis orders of ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wasps and Suicide. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

Wasps and Sulolde. Some time, ago, a scientist, being 1 curious to see the effect of benzine on a wasp, put some of it under a glass in which a wasp was imprisoned. The ' wasp immediately showed signs of great annoyance and anger, darting at a piece of paper which had intro duced the benzine into his cell. By and-bye he seems to have given up the unequal contest in despair, for he lay down on his back, and bending up his abdomen, planted his sting thrice into his body, and then died. The experimenter allowed his scientific in terest to overcome his humanity so far as to repeat the experiment with three wasps-, only to find that the ■ other two did likewise. He is, there fore, of opinion that wasps, under desperate circumstances, commit sui cide.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR LITTLE ICNORANCES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

OUfi LITTLE ICNORANCE8. A police constable in court recently, when put to the test by the persiding magistrate as to the length o£ a minute, made his minute last only 35 seconds. It is really surprising the results you will get by taking out your watch and requesting your friends to tell you when a minute has elapsed. ! Another question which most people are unable to answer correctly is, how is the figure 4 represented on the dial of a watch in Roman figures? The answer generally received is, "Why, with an I and a V, of course!" This is, however, not the case, four strokes being correct. It is almost incredible, yet 99 per sons out of 100 cannot tell you, with out counting the number of buttons on their waistcoat, as also The number of eyelet-holes in their boots, in spite of the fact that they have probably adjusted these particular articles of apparel hundreds of times. Again, the attempts of most people to define the number of matches con tained in an ordinary box of Swedish saf...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NONE BUT THE BRAVE— [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

NONE BUT THE BRAVE Really, he was a most kind-heart ed old gentleman, but one of those who cannot help raising' objections to any propositions that are put up to them.. He was expecting a call from his daughter's lover, who was to ask formally for her hand. The old man liked the young fellow well enough, yet, the moment he made his appear ance, he scowled at him. "You think I'm going to let you marry my daughter, do you?" he growled. i "Don't think I said so, did I?" an- ^ swered the young man coolly. "Well, that's what what you were going to say I" he continued fiercely. "Who told you so?" retorted the lover. "What on earth did you come to see me for then ?' gasped the astonished old gentleman. "Oh, well, I thought I might as well get your consent to the marriage, if I could—looks better, you know! But we shall get married in any case, whether you like it or not!" The old gentleman grasped his hand. "You'll do!" he said. "I've always hoped for a son-in-law with some pluck in him!"<...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOLD AGAIN? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

SOLD AGAIN? Ho: "Seven and sis for this, yon say? Aren't you a little dear?" Slio: "Go on, flattoror. All the young fellows toll mo that!"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A STORY OF A BISHOP. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

A STORY OF A BISHOP. A pompous. Bishop of Oxford was once stopped on a London street by a ragged urchin. "Well, my little man, and what can I do for you?" inquired the Church man. "The time o' day, please, your lord ship."' With, considerable difficulty the port ly bishop extracted his timepiece. "It is exactly half-past five, my lad." "Well," said the boy, setting his feet for a good start, "at 'alf past six you go to 'ell" and lie was off like a flash and around the corner. "The bishop, flushed and furious, his watch dangling from its chain, flound ered wildly after him. But as he round ed the corner ho ran plump into the outstretched arms of the venerable Bishop of London. "Oxford, Oxford," remonstratod that surprised dignitary, "why this unseem ly haste?" Puffing, blowing, sputtering, tho out raged bishop gasped out: "That young ragamuffin—I to Id Jiira it was liajf-pasfc five—and lie—or—told me to go to hell nt lmlf-past six." "Yes, yes," said tho Bishop of Lon don with tho sus...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Origin of "Blackguard." [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

Origin of "Blackguard." Tho earliest rceord of the term black* guard is in the Churchwarden's Ac count of St. Mnry-at-Hill, London, where under date 1532, is: "ltom, re ceived for iiij. Torches of the Black Guard iiijd.*' This, and the following old lines, seem to show that tho namo was then applied to link-hoys: "Her Cupid is a blackguard boy. That rubs his link full in your face." Tho namo was also given to menial servants in tho King's kitchen. In Iho "Calendar of State Papers" is the Fol lowing entry: "August 17th, 1535, Sir William Fitzwilliam to Mr, Secretary Cromwell: Refusal of the workmen to work for less than Gd. a: day. Two of the ringleaders had been for some of tho time 'Black Guards' of tho King's kitchen." These "Black Guards" were responsible for the cooking uten sils a*id coals. According to Miss Strickland, the historian, the scullions of tho Royal kitchen were for many centuries clad in black, and woro called tlie Black Guards of England.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KILL THAT FLY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

KILL THAT FLY. Make a rulo, and keep it through out the year, of destroying the con tents of dustbins and all refuse heaps at least onco a week. Evory kind of refuse is a breeding place for flies. One female will pro duce in one month 500,250,000 other flies, fully equipped with a perfect outfit for carrying disease. The fly spreads sickness and death by its filthy manner of feeding. The mouth of the fly is a sort of trunk from which protrude tivo moist pads. With1 these pads the food—no matter whether it bo on a manure heap or your dinner table—is moistened and then sucked up. Kill that flyl But better still, as it takes ten days for ai fly to come to maturity, destroy tho breeding places onco a week!

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME AMATEURS FAULTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

SOME AMATEURS FAULTS. Amateur photographers do not, in many cases, pay sufficient attention to the composition of the picture they are taking', particularly when the photograph is a portrait taken in doors. A quite plain person will often make a charming picture if suitably and gracefully posed against a good background. Most amateur indoor photographs show too much furniture. ?fs a mat ter of fact, a better picture is invari ably obtained when a greater part of the furniture is moved out of range of the camera. It does away with that crowded appearance seen in so many otherwise good photographs, and gives, instead, a sense of space and proportion. Amateurs may obtain excellent effects by posing their subjects before a mirror. The portrait, which should always have a dark, hanging back ground, may be taken in profile with the full face reflected in the mirror. Or the position may be reversed, the profile outlined in the mirror, and the full, or three-quarter, face looking at the cam...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WOODEN BOWL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

THE WOODEN BOWL. In old Japan there lived a poor woman with one child, a wonderfully beautiful girl. The woman fell , ill. and knowing that she was going to die she placed a big wooden bowl on j her daughter's head, telling her al ! ways to wear it, lest her beauty should ; bring her misfortune. ! 0 Mara San was never seen after that without her queer head-dress, and the people round about used to laugh at her and call her "The Maid with the bowl on her Head." One day she was working in the fields whe.n the lord of the land passed that way, and was struck with her, industry, in spite of the way she was being worried by some foolish young men who wanted to peep under the bowl and see her face. He took her into his own house to wait on his wife, who was very ill, and 0 Mara San soon won their hearts by her kindness and gentleness. All went well until the great mall's eldest son came home from Court, and seem ed in no lnirry to go away again. The fact was that lie felt very curious abo...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
QUESTION OF SPELLING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

QUESTION OF SPELLING. He had returned from a Trans atlantic voyage, and he let all the tramcar know it. "Yes," he said, pompously, to the old gentleman with the silk hat and grey whiskers, who sat opposite, "we had a most eventful trip. There was a marriage on board, two deaths, and " "Any births?" interrogated the old gentleman, with a twinkle in his eye. "No—er—no births," answered the other, in a manner which indicated that perhaps the old gentleman was trying to "pull his leg." "Dear me, that's very strange 1" exclaimed he of the grey whiskers, rising as the tramcar slowed up. "What is strange?" "Why, no births. I have crossed forty-three times, and there have al ways been births on board." The pompous note in the new l fledged traveller's voice gave place to ;■ a tinge of reverence as the other men tioned the figures; but he asked:— "Well, what do you call a number of births? Two, three, four, or " "No, indeed. Why, the last time I crossed there were over five hundred, and " "W...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROSES IN FRANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

ROSES IN FRANCE. Tho roso-growors of Lyons havo al most from timo iinmomorial taken ad vautago of tho favourable conditions until skill and interest in tho industry have niado tlvo roses of tho Rhono Valloy known throughout tho parks and gardens of tho world. Tho ground where tho roses aro ehielly cultivated is on tho outskirts of tho city. It is flat, dovoid of trees, and protected only by high walls at tho confines of tho pro* pcrty. Tho roso plants aro set out for commercial purposes in straight rows, somotimes one hundred feet long. Nearly all the plants aro out of doors. Tho greenhouses for a. rose-garden of fifteen acros do not number more than two, averaging thirty foet in length. It is only in exceptional wintors that tho plants havo to be covered. Some times the tops of tho older plants aro rather loosely bound in straw. In every largo commercial rose-gar don of Lyons hundreds of eglantino roso plants aro kept to a single stalk for grafting. These aro usually gath ered by p...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RANDOM READINGS. WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

RANDOM HEADINGS. o———• WHAT MIGHT HAVE liEEN According to a book published in Germany, untitled "Crowned ami Un crowned iMiundM ol tho .Jo\v«," tho iJriti.sli Emjmo lias to LiLauk u .low for tho jmnnionanco of tho present suc cession ol' tho dynasty. Tho story goes that slvortly bol'ono tho lato King JCdwnrd Vli. was born, Queen Victoria had gone to Italy for tho bonolit ol her health, and, with tho ooncunencu of her Ministers, sho rosoivod to ro main in that country until after tho birth. It was then that tho Rabbi Nathan Adlor realised tho danger of tho situa tion. Ho hastened to tho Foreign Min ister, and informed him that an heir to tho Crown of England must bo burn on Englisji soil, and if tho birth took placo abroac tho oxpoctod Prince would lose his right to tho throuo. Tho Ministers consequently arranged that tho Queen should return to this coun try without delay, and it was not long afterwards that tho young Princo was born. Tho Ilabbi'fl Ihon^litfulness was nover forgotten...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EFFECTS OF WATER DRINKING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

EFFECTS OF WATER DRINKING. For the past few years physicians have been strenuously ursine tlie necessity of drinking water. Copious draughts are required by the system, not only to assimilate with the food, but to llush the stomach, bowels, and kidneys, in order that they may be better able to perform their work. Men and women in every commun ity have been experimenting along these lines, and are proving the wis dom and efficacy of this daily internal bath. There must be method, how ever, in this frequent flushing of the system with water, or harm instead of good will follow. To eat a hearty meal of even the most wholesome kind of food and im mediately wash it all down with a glass of ice water is a foolhardy pro ceeding. Moderately cold, or even hot water, or in fact, liquid of any kind, cannot be taken with impunity into the stomach on top of a hearty meal, Water, in order to have the most desirable effect, should be taken on an empty stomach, otherwise the gas tric fluid will be ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NAPOLEON'S TRIBUTE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

NAPOLEON'S TRIBUTE. When, after the battle of .Tcna, Napoleon invaded Prussia, he visited Potsdam, which contains the mortal remains of the Prussian kinps. The sepulchre of Frederick the Great oc cupied a prominent site in the mauso leum. When entering" the latter, Napoleon uncovered his head, and went dircctly up to the sarcophagus of the noted warrior. For a moment the conqueror stood still, seemingly absorbed in deep thought. Then with the forefinger of his right hand he wrote the wort! "Napoleon" in the dust of the huge stone casket, and turning to his mar-, slials, said:— "Gentlemen,, if he were living:, I would not be here."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) THE VILLAGE MYSTERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

(Am. Biosts Rxjiavao.) THE VILLAGE MYSTERY. By DEREK VANE. Author of ''The Soul of a Man," "The Three Daughters of Night," "The Secret Door,*' &amp;e. "I'm dying,1' he said. "It's no use, you can't do .anything. This h the end." Hia eyes travelled slowly over the vast expanse of prairie, bright with spring flowers, delicate blossoms that swayed in the wind till the great un dulating plain looked like a shimmering aea. Hls-«gazo rested longest of all on the range of low-lying hills that flank ed the horizon, then came back to the face of the man who knelt by his I side. "It's bad luck!" he said, half whim sically. "I don't want to go. I'm quite content with this world. I don't want a bettor, and"—with a twist of his lips—"I'm not likely to got it." His companion tried to speak some words of comfort. "Oh, yes, that's all right. It's the proper thing to say, but it doesn't j mirke it any easier. Why, but for a j mere chance, I might have lived an- j other thirty years." It was true...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) COMPLETE STORIES. THE BITING OF THE BITER. 1. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 February 1914

(Atx. Riant# Rsssrtbd.) COMPLETE STORIES. THE BITING OF THE BITER. (by Lucien Huttou.) J. Miss Nelly Milner was the only daughter of a very wealthy father; and when one takes into consideration also the fact that she was extremely pretty, besides being also extremely charming, one quite realises that probably she had many admirers. She had; though only two—lack Hargreaves and Lionel Gilchrist—were, or at any rate appear ed to be, in the running. Both were well-to-do, though Jack Hargreaves had to work hard for the greater pan of his income, occupying as he did a responsible position in one of the great City banking houses, while Gilchrist had been relieved of the necessity of working by the will of a j wealthy father. He was an artist—of corts; he, at any rate, paid rent for a eery fine studio, in which occasionally, for the amusement of his many friends, ho produced impressionistic masterpieces. For a long time the struggle between the two for the hand of Xcll Milner continued with...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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