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Elephind.com contains 74,785 items from Huntingdon Globe, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Id=110 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 28 February 1855

r\ueensware-«a fine assortment just receiv \J at the store of LONG &- DECKER. Januarv-3d. 1854.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 28 February 1855

(lO D.Fish, Machcral, Herring &c., just recei J ved smr! for. ?a)f> \>v J. Sr W. SAXTOV

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 16 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

How to Raise and Feed Fowls We find in the New York Tribune, the following communication from Mr. H. S. Ballot; , of Blackstone, Mass., who has had much experience in raising and feeding fowls. Numerous individual applications have induced him to make his system known in this public way. He says : In the first place, I would recommend to all who intend breeding fowls, whether for pleasure, convenience or profit, to procure some pure breed, of whatever variety they fancy, and then bread them pure, and improve upon them, year after year, by selecting their finest, best modeled pullets for breeding purposes, and by changing the cock yearly, so as to avoid breeding "in and in." By pursuing this course, fowls may be increased in size and beauty to an extent perfectly astonishing. By the opposite course, the largest varieties may be reduced to the size of the smallest bantam. Follow the same rule in breeding to the feathers. Take a pair of black bantams, with only one white feather, a...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 11 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

A Pew Hints to a Father. Father, you have a son, a darling son.— He has faculties for good and for evil, and they must act. Each capable of such intense action that both cannot act on a level, one must be, in some measure, subservient.— Your son is now youug; he has no habits—no principles—no character. These must be formed, and you have been appointed b_y Providence to superintend and assist in this formation. This you must do, whether you will or not. The nature of the relation existing between you and your son renders your non-participation in the formation ol his character impossible. Toward what course of life would you direct his innocent footsteps ? What would you have him become 1 A man in form only ; independent only of good, with feeble, wavering energ y " his self-respect a mere low, disgusting pride? You can easily train him for this, as a thousand have and are being trained, unless his mind is very far above the commonality. Treat him as a machine, impres it upon bi...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 13 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

The Man who Fired the First Shot. The first American who discharged his gun on the day of the battle of Lexington, was Ebenezer Lock, who died at Peering, N. H., about fifty years ago. He resided in Lexington in 1775. The British regulars, at the order of Major Pitcairn, having fired upon the few " rebels " upon the green in front of the meeting house, killing some 3 and wounding others, it was the signal for war. " The citizens," writes one , " might be seen coming from all directions, otrer the fields, through the woods—each with his rifle in his hand, his powder horn slung to his side, and his pockets provided with bullets. Among the number was Ebenezer Lock. The British -had posted a reserve of infantry a mile in the rear, in the direction of Boston. This was in the immediate neighborhood of Mr. Lock, who instead of hastening to join the party at the green, placed himself in an old celier, at a convenient distance for doing execution. A portion of the reserve were standing o...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 12 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Advice to Consumptives. In some good advice to consumptives, Dr. Hall says: " Eat all you can digest, and exercise a great deal in the open air, to convert what you eat into pure healthful blood. Do not be afraid of out-door air,day or night. Do not be afraid of sudden changes of weather: let no change, hot or cold, keep you in doors. If it is rainy weather it is more need for your going out, because you eat as much on a rainy day as upon a clear day, and if you exercise less, that much more remains in the system of what ought to be thrown off by exercise, and some ill result, some consequent symptom or ill feelings is the certain issue. If it is cold out of doors, do not muffle your eyes, mouth and nose in furs, veils, woolen comforters, and the like; nature hjis supplied you with the best muffler, with the best inhaling regulator, that is, two lips ; shut thom before you step out of a warm room into the cold air. and keep them shut until you have walked briskly a few rods and ...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 6 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Business the Charm of Life. No passion is more ruinous than " the haste to be rich."' It is condemned alike by revelation, reason and sound practical expepeuceof life. It leads men into unsafe and ruinous speculation • it seduces them from fast anchored property to the mirage that glitters. It allows the hands of industry ima employment to stand still on the dialplate of life, while jneri grasp at shadows. It is this passion lhat separates the business past from the business present by so wide a gulf. The modern merchant, with small capital, and that, perhaps, not his own, with his granite store, his mahogany desk, his country seat, fast horse and rash speculations, scorns the example of his sire, who at his desk of pine and baize, sat each day six mortal hours at his business, doing his own errands, and being his own clerk. With so wide a contrast it is not strange that so many begin business where their sire left off, and leave off where their sire begun. Tt is employment we...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 18 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

A Powerful Machine. A fire occurred in Lockhaven, on the 6th inst., which destroyed a large building, called the Arcade. The fire engine of the town ia thus described in connexion with the conflagration : The " machine " was brought to the scene of conflagration, and its appearance greeted with loud and repeated cheers, by the assembled crowd. It was soon put into service, and from its nozzle a stream of water was projected in a graceful curve tha distance of ten feet. The Arcade was entirely consumed ; but fortunately, by timely exertions, the engine was filled with water and moved out of reach of danger. We have seen this precious article of borough property similarly exposed before. There is no insurance upon it, and if it should happen to take fire when exposed in this way, it would be a total loss. We respectfully suggest to our borough fathers the propriety of Having it safely deposited somewhere in the bottom.!.of the dam.— then in case of fire hereafter, our citizens w...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 5 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

BLIND BOY AT PLAY B7 ELIZA COOp. The blind boy's been ut play, mother, And merry games we had ; We led him on our way, mother, And every step was glad. But when we found a starry flower, And praised its varied hue, A tear came trembling down his chock, Just like a drop of dow. We took him to the mill, , Where falling waters made A rainbow o' er the riii, mother, As golden sun.rays plnycd ; But when we shouted at the scene, And hailed the clear blue sky, He stood quite still upon the bank, And breathed a. long, long sigh. We asked him why he -wept, mother, Whcne'r we found tho spots Where periwinkle crept, mother, O'er wild forget-me-nots : "Ah me !' ; he said, while tears ran down As fast as summer showers, "It is because I cannot see Tho sunshino and the flowers."' Oh ! that poor sightless boy, mother, Has taught me I am blessed, For I enn look~with joy, mother, On all I love the best ; And when I seethe dancing stream, And daisies red and white, I kneel upon the meadow s...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 8 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

A Christian's Credentials. What are they? Not the blossoms of a fair profession, but the ripe and mellow fruit of godlike actions. Cornelius ' prayers and alms came up as a memorial before God—not his prayers alone, nor his alms alone, but his prayers and his alms. Beautiful conjunction . Piety towards God, and an active charity towards all mankind ; the tA'in personifications of vital, saving piety. Salvation is of grace, not of merit, not of words, less any man should boast. But faith, without works, is dead. It is liks an index, without a book .; like hands, without a clock ; like sails, without a ship, like a tree, without nothing butdry and withered branches.— Professed disciple of Christ ,to prove they decipleship genuine, thou must eurrouud thyself with widows, whom thou hast comforted—with orphans, whom thou hast succored—with the ignorant, whom thou hasl instructed —with the wandering, whom thou hast reclaimed—-with the hungry, 1 whom thou hast fed—with the naked, whom ...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 15 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Fashion. Fashion rules the world, and a most tyrannical mistress she is—compelling people to submit to the most inconvenient things imaginable, for fashion ' s sake. She pinches our feet with tight shoes—or choaks us with a tight handkerchief, or squeezes our breath out of our bodies by tight lacing; she makes people sit up by night when they ought to he in bed, and up and doing. She makes it vulgar to wait on one' s self, and genteel to live idle and useless. She makes people visit when they would rather be at home ; eat when they are not hungry, and drink when they are not thirsty. . ; . She invades onr pleasures, and interrupts our business. She compels the people to dress gayly—whether upon their property or that of others, vchether agreeably to the word .of God or the dictates of pride. She ruins health and produces sickness—destroys life and occasions premature death.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 14 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Social Kindness. How sweet is social affection. When the world is dark without, wo have light within. When cares disturb the breast—when sorrow broods about the heart—what joy gathers in the circle of love ! We forget the world with all its animosities, whilsi blest with secial kindness. That man cannot be unhappy who has a heart that vibrates in sympathy with his own—who is cheered by the smiles of affection and the voice of ten¬ derness. Let the world be dark and cold—let the hate and animosity of men gather about him in tho place of business—but when he enters the ark of love—his own cherished circle—he forgets all these, and the cloud passes from his brow, and the sorrow from his heart. The warm sympathies of his wife and children dispel every shadow, and he feels a thrill of joy in his bosom which words are not adequate to express.— He who is a stranger to the joys of 6ocial kindness, has not begun to live.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 4 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Agents for tne Globe. The following gcntlom"en are authorized to receive the names of all who may desire to become subscribers to the Globeand to receive advance payments and receipt for the same. Hknry ZimmermanEsq.Coffee Run. Wji. Camfbeix,' M'Connellstown. Benj. F. Patton^ Esq. , Warriorsmark. John Owens, Esq,, Birmingham. R. I 1 '. IIaslett, Spruce Creek. II. B. MytinuerWater Street. Silas A. Ciiessweli.Manor Hill. David Bariiick West Barrcc. Thos. Ozeorn, Ennisvillc. Gu.bert CiianeyEsq.East Barrcc. Dr. M. Miller, Jackson tp. Samuei, M'VittyShirleysburg. S. B, Young, Throe Springs. M. F. Campueli-, Esq., Maploton. J. R. HunterPetersburg. J. S, Hunt, Shade Gap. D. II. CampbellMarklcsburg-II. C. Walker, Alexandria. J. S. Gkhrett, Cussville. 11 11 ii inn ii. u iii J_ n j-LU'ill '!¦¦»« ¦ JMtJ ' JffTt^Tg^^aJ'gJt:>t^ CaCCK'*B.f XILil>W iaS

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 3 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

THE HUNTINGDON GLOBE, Per annum, in advance, §>1 50 n " if not paid in advance, 2 00 No papor discontinued until all arrearages are paid. A failure to notify a discontinuance at the expiration of the term subscribed for will be considurcd a new engagement. Terms of Advertising. 1 ins. 2 ins. 3 ins. Six lines or less, 25 37i 50 1 square, 16 lines, brevier, 50 75 1 00 2 " " 1 00 1 50 2 00 3 '• " 1 50 2 25 3 00 3ni. G m. 12 m. 1 square, " §3 00 $5 00 $8 00 2 " " 5 00 8 00 1-2 00 3 " "7 50 10 00 15 00 4 " "9 00 14 00 23 00 5 •' " 15 00 25 00 38 00 10 « " 25 00 40 00 GO 00 Professional and Business Cards not exceeding G lines, one year, S4 00

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 19 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

Fresh Air. Horace Mann has weJl said: "People who shudder at a flesh wound and a trickle of blood, will confine their children like convicts, and compel them-month after molnh to breathe quantities of poison. It would less impair the mental and phisical constitutions of chitdren, gradually to draw an ounce of blood from their veins, during the same length of time, than to send them to breathe, for six hours in a day. the " lifeless and poisoned air of some of our school-rooms. Let any man, who votes for confining childlen ia small rooms and keeping them on stagnant air, try the experiment of breathing his own breath only four times over; and if medical aid bo not on hand, the children will never be endangered by his vote afterwards.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 20 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

DC?* Hail is frozen rain produced by cold currents of air blowing against the small vesicles of water before they assume the heavier properties of rain drops. Snow is produced in lower regions of the air than hail, and is frozen after it leaves the clouds. Lightning is produced by electricity rushing from cloud to cloud. Thunder ia the noise occasioned by that discharge.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 17 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

A "Matter or Fact ; Man.—When Doctor Bradon was Rector of Eltham, in Kent , (England,) the text he one day took to preach from, was—"Who art thou V After reading' .he text, he made (as was his custom,) a pause for the congregation to reflect upon the words, when a gentleman in military dress was*marching very sedately up the middle aisle of the churchsupposing it to be a question addressed to him, to the surprise of all presentreplied, "I am, sir, an officer of the 17th footon a recruiting party here; and having brought wife and family with me, I wish to be acquinted with the neighboring gentry and clergy. " From the Ohio Farmer. How to Raise Potatoes without Hoeing, Mr. Editor :—In your paper of 25thNov. you invite farmers to write for their own paper. In compliance with that invitation, I will venture to tell the readers of the Farmer how we raise potatoes without hoeing. In the first place, we plough the ground as deep as we conveniently can. Say from ten inches to a foot. ...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

She makes foolish parents, invalids of children, and servants of us all. She is a tormentor of conscience, despoiler of morality, and enemy to religion, and no one can be her companion and enjoy either. She is a despot of the highest grade, full of intrigue and cunning—and yet husbands, wives, fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, and servants, black and white, voluntarily have become her servants; and slaves, and vie with one another to see who shall he most obsequious.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 9 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

[Cr* It's a very solemn thing to get married," said Aunt Bethany.. " Yes, but it's a great deal more solemn not to be," said her niece.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 29 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 7 March 1855

From the Clearfield Republican, Feb. 28. ENO W-JSTOTHIWG-ISM EXPOSED The following communication from a highly respectable citizen of this county, is published ai the request of the author. The statement is voluntarily made, and we hope will put to rest the doubts heretofore existing in some minds as to whether this secret organization were bound together by oaths. All who are acquainted with Thomas Majiaffey. Esq., in this county, will bear testimony to his high moral worth as a citizen. It will be useless for the members of the order, longer to deny its obligations, or attempt to scieen tliemse.lvfs from rt-nioach ! This ex¬ posure fastens upon them two tilings ; fiist that thf.y have ki themselves down to a level with membership in it , and secondly that they have falsified the truih when they denied it. Let it pass round. Road it , we say, and then if any man can be found mean enough to advocate snch an order in a free counli y, and under a Republican form of Government ...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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