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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Athletics in Eastern Colleges. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

Athletics in Eastern Colleges. PT VERY Autumn the charges are made that athletics " absorb more interest than the lecture room presided over by the superior talent of the educated world." Are these statements true ? The arguments upon which these are based are mainly that from " the very nicely gotten up papers that are published at certain of the northern and eastern colleges, the impression becomes lodged in the mind of the reader, that the major part of their curriculum consists in boat racing, foot-ball, etc." %[y endeavor in this matter, will be to show, by statistics carefully compiled from our own College, the falsity of these charges ; and also to demonstrate the reasons why college papers at "certain of the northern and eastern colleges" devote the space they do to athletics. Columbia can certainly be considered as a representative college in respect to this so-called excess of athletics, and it may be especially considered as such during the last 'two years. What we may th...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Romance of Mt. Desert. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

A Romance of Mt. Desert. \XTELL, old boy ; why did I leave college ? Just sit down, and I'll tell you all about it. Ever been to Mt. Desert ? No ! Then just go next summer. Make a note of it, and don't forget it. What sort of a place ? The best you ever went to if you happen to go with a nice lot of people, and duller than Sing-Sing if you meet a lot of prim old fogies. You see, it's a "cool, salubrious climate," as the guide-books say, just the place for the old folks to recruit before coming back to the worries of shoving off unmarketable stocks and daughters, and also just the place for the best of the world to have a good time if they choose. What is there to do ? Why, bathe in ice-cold water, if you like it, which I don't, and go on quiet drives on hilly, out-of-the-way roads on that sublime vehicle, the buckboard, which, by the way, is second only to the Canadian caleshe for taking a girl to ride. This latter vehicle is constructed on such principles that sudden jolts in the r...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Correspondence. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

Correspondence. To the Editors of THE SPECTATOR : P HE freshman class evidently entered upon its career with the intention of " making things howl" at College, and they undoubtedly will succeed in eliciting a howl from the upper classmen if they persist in having a class pin. I believe that no other class in the School of Arts, with the exception of '79, has ever adopted a class pin. Seventy-nine had a very good reason for having one, for but a small percentage of the class joined secret societies, and, as the majority of the members wished to be able to sport some badge, a class pin was chosen. But a great many men from 'B3 have joined the literary or secret societies, so they have no such motive ; and as probably not more than twenty-five men will buy pins, it will only create an unnecessary distinction between those who can afford to buy them, and those who cannot. Of course there are men in every class, who, because they cannot get into a respectable society, and not being conte...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Correction. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

A Correction. T N our last issue we gave the Princetonian credit for a squib entitled " The Shenanagger," but since then we have seen a copy of the original piece, and find that this squib was the last verse. It is a parody on Bret Harte's Heathen Chinee , and is entitled The Heathen Pass-ee, by Bred Hard. It appeared in an English publication, and the greater part of it was published in the JV. Y. Evening Post, some time during 1872, as an extract from the original work. We reprint the extract, though it has appeared in one of our college papers, namely, the Cap and Gown , for February, 1873. Will not the Pnncetonian explain ? " But I shall not forget How, the next day at two, A stiff paper was set By Examiner U , On Euripides' tragedy, ' Bacchm ;' A subject Tom ' partially knew.' " But the knowledge displayed By that heathen Pass-ee, And the answers he made Were quite frightful to see, For he rapidly floored the whole paper, By about twenty minutes to three. " Then I looked up at ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Fable. From The Crimson. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

A Fable. From The Crimson. A WILY old cat, having by her vigorous efforts, well thinned out a colony of mice, had one day got within her reach a certain young mouse, almost the last survivor of his race. He begged the feline for his life and liberty. " I am," said he, "very young, and have never tried to escape or outwit you. I have an interest in the continuance of our species, and although you may devour me now, there will be no gratification in having exterminated us." Moved by this appeal, the old cat gave the mouse his life, and in the aftermath she and her family took much enjoyment in preying upon the posterity of the mouse. MORAL : —lf one cribbing freshman is spared, many seniors lose their degrees.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Foot-Ball. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

Foot-Ball. FRESHMEN VS. POLYTECHNICS. ' | A HE freshmen team played and defeated a team from the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, on Wednesday, Dec. 2d. The sides were made up in the following manner : COLUMBIA. Rushers —Hausling, Remington, Parsons, Van Schaick, and Cowles. Half-Backs —Eldridge (captain), Whitney, and Francke, Backs —Rossiter and Lynch. POLYTECHNIC. Rushers Shanks, Moran, Griffiths, Griffin, Loomis, and Sherman. HalfBacks —Edwards, Chauncey, and Janks (captain). Back —Dike. The Polvtechnics won the toss and chose the j north side of the ground. Hausling, of Columbia, kicked off, and the ball was immediately forced into close proximity to the Polytechnic goal, and remained there during the greater part of the game. The Polytechnics, though evidently overmatched, played pluckily, and prevented Columbia from securing more than one touch-down during the first half-hour. During the second half, Columbia forced matters a little (although playing with nine men against elev...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
About College. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

About College. HE sophomores have decided to present a cup to Spenser, for 'B2's first baby-boy. THE candidates for the junior Greek prize of S3OO, will this year tackle " The Seven against Thebes." THE Columbiad committee hope to have that publication ready shortly after the holidays. Historians, etc., are hereby notified. BE sure to attend and hear the joint debate between Peithologia and Barnard, on Friday next, in chapel. THE Lawn Tennis has chosen for its team, with substitute, McVickar and Barnwell, 'BO ; De Rham, 'Bl ; de Ruyter and Lesher, 'B3. DR. S. AUSTEN PEARCE has sued the Glee Club for S9O, which amount, he claims, is due for the extra lessons last year. THE work at the gymnasium has just commenced, most of the wearers of the Blue and White being freshmen. A decided bracing up is in order. SEVERAL muscular men are in danger of being interviewed by the faculty, in consequence of too liberal display of their strength on college property. THE Annual Registers, that are no...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN MEMORIAM [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

IN MEMORIAM as it hath pleased Almighty God, in His infinite providence, to remove, by a sudden death, our deceased friend and associate, FRANK FRAZIER NADAL, We, the members of the class of 'BO, of Columbia College, desiring to express the deep sense of our sorrow, and our irreparable loss in the death of our classmate ; therefore, be it Resolved , That, in the death of Frank Frazier Nadal, this class has lost one of its most faithful students, and a most loyal and devoted friend. Resolved , That in this, our common bereavement, we tender to the afflicted family of our dear friend, the heartfelt sympathy of each individual member of the class. Resolved , That these resolutions be inscribed upon the records of the class, and that a copy be sent to the family of the deceased, and that they be published in the college papers. CHAS. F. MOODY, S. VICTOR CONSTANT, H. W. HOWELL, JR., FRANK DRAPER, WM. G. LE BOUTILLIER. Dec. ioth, 1879. Committee.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

School of Mines. IV T OW is the domain of the peaceful chemist invaded by the barbarous " miner, " fresh from scenes of conquest in the park. PROF. TROWBRIDGE sustained a severe fall on Monday from a runaway carriage. His injuries, though painful at times, do not prevent him from continuing his lectures. There was a young man from Koratch, Who sang, "Fusible, Soluble, Scratch," But he didn't get six, So he picked up his sticks, And started in haste for Koratch. THE time for the chemists to quit the " Assay Lab." has arrived, but they don't seem to be ready to get out. The Department is invariably impeded by the overflow of specials, and Dr. Ricketts has requested Dr. Chandler not to admit any more, and the era of the suppression of the "bum special " will commence. THE reception committee from the class of 'So have resigned, because the chairman of the committee was elected from the class of 'B2. As the chairmen have always been elected from the highest class represented, the gentle...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Law. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

School of Law. THE catalogue of 1879-80 will be out, it is announced, about the 20th. DR. ORDRONEAUX'S lectures will also close with the commencement of the Christmas vacation. SOME of the students have called a meeting for the purpose of adopting a Law School "'badge, or pin." We earnestly commend them to confer with the Count Joannes, as a member of the bar, who indorses decorations. PROFESSOR DILLON'S lectures on Equity and Federal Law and Practice will be continued till the holidays, after which the senior class will take up either Addison on Torts, or the Law of Insurance and Shipping, probably the former subject. WE feel the necessity of urging one of our professors, in treating of mediaeval history, to say less about the " reign of the club." We value our professor very highly, and Captain W ms might —but we hope this warning will be sufficient. A JUNIOR, who has heard that equity will reform a defective conveyance, wants to know if the proposition applies to a bob-tail horse...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The College World. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

The College World. CORNELL: — The gymnasium is to be enlarged. A signal station has been established at Cornell by the engineer department. The university farm, including campus, consists of two hundred and sixty-four acres ; the total endowment fund is $1,263,999 1 salaries of fifty-four instructors (of all ranks) amount to $73,283; annual expenditures, about $110,000; number of graduates, six hundred and twentyone ; of undergraduates, four hundred and thir-ty-five. The Chief Engineer of the Mexican InterOcean Railway has asked the Engineer Department to nominate six or eight Cornell graduates, for immediate employment. HARVARD : The Glee Club will probably give a concert in New York during the approaching Christmas recess. The probable date will be Dec. 22d, and the Union League Theatre is mentioned as a likely place for the entertainment, but nothing is yet definitely decided upon. A few enthusiastic tennis players may still be seen disporting themselves on the otherwise deserted...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Library. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

The Library. r I A HE magazines for this month are excellent, and, in some instances, the best numbers that the publishers have ever issued. St. Nicholas is remarkable in its size and quality. While we have not the space to attempt a criticism, we would advise those wanting a good thing, that contains not only the usual reading for children, but also instruction for other " children," in a quiet and suggestive manner, to subscribe at once for this monthly. As an evidence of the quality of the work, the sale has been large enough to warrant the publishers in issuing an "edition in French, to be published in Paris, which will be, as far as practicable, in another language, a reproduction of the American magazine." Appletoris Journal , for December, brings to a close, "Vivian, the Beauty," in an interesting manner. " Memoirs of Mademede Remusat " are further continued, with other articles, among which we particularly noticed Chaps. XXII. and XXIII. of " The Seamy Side," and " Fragments...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Our Exchanges. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

Our Exchanges. \T UMBER five of the Lampoon contains some excellent pictures, with morals attached. A page is devoted to the subject which has been exciting so much interest in Massachusetts, namely, that of the Catholics and the public schools. A picture of the Chinese Professor, in a recumbent position, smoking his pipe, while a bottle of wine stands on the table near him, has printed underneath, " Glorious success of the great Chinese experiment at Harvard. Muchee loafee, no teachee." The delicate satire, from the following, is also very suggestive : MAUD. —"And now you've shown me all your favors, dear, do tell me who were there —the men, of course, I mean." ALICE. —" O, let me see ! There were lots of Harvard men, of course —yes, and some real men." "Rollo's Journey to Cambridge" is an excellent parody upon the style of the Rollo books. THE Yale Record has generally good, solid editorials, but there might be a little more liveliness in the paper. It is newsy, though, and probab...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Shavings. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

Shavings. DROF. IN ROMAN HISTORY : " Mr. V , for what was the war with Pyrrhus remarkable?" MR. V : " I think that it was the first time that the Romans ever saw the elephant." (Applause.)— Cornell Era. SCENE : Senior Philosophy Recitation. Prof. —" But is the heat in the fire ? " Senior. —(dodging)—" Heat is rather indefinite." Prof. — (forcing) —"Is the fire hot, or are you ?" Senior. —" I am." Prof. —" Then the heat is in yourself ?" Senior. —" Oh, yes." Prof. —(triumphantly)—"Well, now, is the green in the grass ? " Senior. —(innocently) —"No, sir, it's in yourself." Prof. —(after a pause)—" Hem. We do stumble on a witticism sometimes." — Harvard Advovate. A SOPHOMORE, who was desirous to break off correspondence with a certain young lady, wrote to her and said he had lost her address. PROFESSOR : —" Education means a drawing out of the faculties." Soph.: —"Would a rush be education? It draws out ." (Tumultuous applause.) — Ex. SCENE. —English literature recitation. —Subject, Ca...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Winter Meeting. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 16 December 1879

The Winter Meeting. f N our last issue we promised further particulars, and so we give them. The college events have been considerably changed, so much so that we reprint them, with corrections. EVENTS FOR UNIVERSITY MEN. Seventy-five Yards Dash, Hand. Two Hundred and Twenty Yards Dash, Hand. Quarter Mile Run, Hand. Half Mile Run. One Mile Run, Hand. Two Hundred and Twenty Yards Hurdle Race. Two-Mile Bicycle Race. The only change in the Amateur Events is the addition of a One Mile Run for men who have never finished in an open race under sm. 20s. On Saturday, January 3d, 1880, beginning at one o'clock p. M., there will will be a THIRTYMILE RELAY RACE, OPEN TO COLLEGE TEAMS OF SIX MEN (RELAY LIMIT ONE MILE.) TO prevent misunderstanding, we state that the idea in the Relay Race is that each man shall run five miles, but only one mile, 110 more, no less, at a time. Entries close Dec. 26th, 1879. No entry received unless accompanied with the fee. None but bona fide amateurs will be allo...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 13 January 1880

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. V. No. 7. NEW YORK, JANUARY 13th, 1880 SUPPLEMENT

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Current Topics. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 13 January 1880

Current Topics. W HAT has become of the Glee Club ? Last year it nominally met every Friday to practice, but nothing further was heard of it, except in the Columbiad , where the array of names looked quite formidable. It seems curious, with the good voices we undoubtedly have, that nothing can be accomplished. What is needed, is some energetic man, who will be willing to give up the time necessary for training the voices, and getting sufficient enthusiasm into the men to make them attend rehearsals. The choir has profited by the admonition to " brace up," but still is far from the standard aimed at, though it is but fair to Dr. Walter to state that he does all in his power to make the rehearsals interesting.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Correspondence. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 13 January 1880

Correspondence. COLUMBIA COLLEGE, January 9th, 1880. p O all interested in the match with the George Allen Chess Club of the University of Pennsylvania, I take pleasure in announcing that it has resigned the First Game on the Twentyfirst move. Most respectfully, GEORGE E. VAIL.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Semi-Annnal. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 13 January 1880

Semi-Annnal. THE following are the subjects of the SemiAnnual speeches : Republican Institutions, H. S. May. The Elixir of Eife, W. W. Scrugham. The Benefits of Opposition, W. Forster. & The American Goth, J. Carter. One has only to Die to be' Praised, L. J. Boury. The Function of the Literary Society in Columbia College, C. F. Moody. Focal Associations, R. H. Sayre. The Foreign Policy of the United States, R. M. Bull.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 13 January 1880

w E clip the following poem from the Sanitarian, thinking it may serve to elucidate

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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