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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 86 to attend these colleges unaccompanied by any elderly companion. They take rooms and board themselves, two, three and sometimes four together take a room, and as a matter of course they receive visits from their co-students. Virtue in many cases is lost, scandal given, etc. What is most astounding is that parents send their children, especially their daughters, whose vir tue should be dearer to them than life, and just at an age when the opening bud of pure noble womanhood should be watched and guarded with zealous care, that it may send forth its modest sweet fragrance to be a perfume to her whole future life. But, alas! how often it becomes blighted before it is matured. Every observing man and woman knows that a girl between the years of twelve and nineteen, is very thought less, foolish and indiscreet. It is the crazy age, according to a certain authoress, the ago of inconsistency. To place a girl at this age in the midst of such surroundings without the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

S6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE UNITED STATES. HOW THEY GOT TUB NAMES TIIKY UKAU. At a recent meeting of the American Antiquarian Society, Hamilton ' B. Staples read a paper concerning, the origin of the names of the States of the Union. From among other facts are taken the following: The name California first originated in the imagination of the author of a Spanish romance, "Las Sergus de Esplandia." Here the island of Cali fornia, "where great abundance of gold and precious stone is found," was described. The name was probably given to the territory now embraced in this state by some of the Spaniards with Cortez, who, no doubt, had read this sensational romance. Oregon was a name formerly given to an imaginary river in the West. Carver, an American traveler, men tions it in 1793. In describing the river he evidently confounded it with the Missouri, but the name was finally applied to the present State of that name. New Hampshire was named from Hampshire County, of England, by John Mas...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 -o V - "vord," and'"mont" meaning green mountain. Kentucky is from Kontuckeo, an Indian Shawnoso word, signifying "the head of a river" or "long river." Mississippi is from the Indian Meesy seopee, meaning not the "father of waters," but the "great water." Colorado is named from the Rio Col orado River. The name is of Spanish origin, and moans "ruddy" or "red," refcrnng-'to the color of the water of the river. Tennessee is supposed to have been named from Tanssee, one of the chief villages of the Cherokee Indians, situ ated on the banks of the Tennessee River. The name of Minnesota is from the Indian Minnesotah, meaning "colored water." The State of Nevada is said to have been named from the Sierra Nevada mountains, which in turn are said to have been named from the Sierra Nevadas of Granada, Spain. Missouri was named from a river. The word is from the Indian Min-ne-sho-shay, signifying "muddy water." Nebraska's name is of Indian origin, moaning "shallow rive...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

88 THE TNDIAN ADVOCATE. SCIENCE IS ALL-IMPORTANT. Tin: Pleven: which sciknci: takkh in modkkx kducatiox. What knowledge is of most worth? The uniform reply is, Science. This is the verdict on all the counts. For direct self-preservation, or the mainte nance of life and health, the all important knowledge is Science. For that indirect self-preservation, which we call gaining a livelihood, the knowl edge of greatest value is Science. For the due discharge of parental functions, the proper guidance is to be found only in Science. For that interpretation of national life, past and present, without which the citizen cannot rightly regu late his conduct, the indispensable key is Science. Alike for the most per fect production and highest enjoyment of art in all its forms, the needful preparation is still Science. And for purposes of discipline intellectual, moral, religious the most efficient study is, once more Science. The question which at first so per plexed, has become in the course ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 and while these haughty sisters sink into merited neglect, Science, pro claimed as highest alike in worth and beauty, will reign supreme. Herbert Spencer on Education. THE KINDNESS OF GOD. Lord of the world ! Thou who hast plnccd us here, Ilnet willed that we be hnppy, of our needs Thou art omniscent, O, may all our deeds Be such as draw us to Thy mercy near. Happy the man who in Thy Love content Looks to Thee only for the truest joy, The single happiness without alloy That comes of clays well-ordered and well-spent. In grief no sympathy is like to Thine, No consolation like the healing touch Of Him who loved and wept and suffered much, No balm for wounds like that of Hope Divine. O Thou who on the cross remembered me, May every breath I draw be true to Thee. AN INDIAN AGENT. OVKIt PKOI'fillTY ANI KVKItY-DAY IJI'K UK UAH AHHOI.UTK AUTHOIMTY. An Indian agent has absoluto control of affairs on his reservation, subject only to the approval of the Department of t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TUe :AIfiel ofjpUrgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this recalls to a Christian mind. The Catholic Link and the Protestant Void. To the Catholic, Purgatory is a link between time and eternity; to the Pro testant, there is no link, there is a void; and that void is a shadowy land of the unknown,. To a Catholic, Pur gatory is the vestibule of Heaven, the soul's robingroom for the "wedding garment," to "meet the Bridegroom;" to a Protestant there is no place for such seemly robing; the world-clad soul has to rush into the Divine Pres ence. Now, the natural reason, helped by faith, can clearly see the necessity of some pause for the only just-forgiven sinner. A "saint" might possibly rush to the Beatific Vision. A sinner just forgiven, would need a purifying preparation for a change from a life of sin to God's Presence. The use or place of purgatory, in the divine order, is partly shown, at least intimated, by our Lord's parable of "the cockle among the wheat....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9J place we may call the spiritul link. Time is not ended, it is continued; eternity is mercifully begun with time's cleansing; so that the link is the transition-state towards perfection begun on earth, and now awaiting the dawn of day. This is no poetry, but divine truth. "The grub, the chrysalis, and the but terfly" are not poetry but the figuros of higher things. In the Old Testament the doctrine of purgatory was taught by such figures as the "refining silver in the fire" till it was perfectly pure; the Prophets dwelling elaborately on metal-processes, as being easily appre hensible by the Jewish mind. Purga tory was a matter of course to the saintly Jew, as much as it has ever been with the saintly Christian. It was a link between imperfection and perfection, between a mixed and a single purpose or aspiration, between the States of endeavor only and of reward. Without that link there was no place for God's justice. Temporal justice would be denied to the ha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

92 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. link which is divinely necessary be tween time and eternity, and which is the comforting hope of purgation of forgotten sins. The non-Catholic has to fall back on a dreary hope, if a sin cere one, that "the blood of Christ will cleanse him from all sins," and there fore from all the punishment due to sin. He regards the eternal and the temporal remission as the same thing. He sends the death-bed-penitent "straight to glory" with the same con fidence with which he canonizes the moderately or respectably virtuous man of the world. This is equally the taking a low view of the divine Holi ness, and of the creature's longing to be rendered worthy of the divine Com passion. It is indeed making the link between the two worlds to be a dreary, if sincere hope, of the obliteration of all repented and unrepented iniquities. Impossible that even the natural con science can firmly believe that a gross sinner, if penitent, receives "a free pass," like the greatest of saint...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of the Indian Missions. Vol. XI. OCTOBER, 1899. No. 4. LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA AND FRANCE. BV OltAKLKS J. O'Mam.ky. IV. After an uneventful voyage, Lafa yette entered Boston harbor April 27, 17S0. The next day he landed amid the roar of cannon, the crash of music and the acclamation of the multitude. The common people were glad to see this strong man return to them from over seas. The next day he hurried to camp and communicated his glorious news to Washington. France was to help America, and, up to this time America, the struggling, the heroic virgin, knew it not. The most Catholic nations of earth France and Spain in a new world had resolved to set up a temple of liberty wherein all the races and tribes of men might worship in peace. On the 13th day of May he again of fered his services to Congress, which again accepted his aid with a public resolution of thanks. When the French fleet arrived, a thrill of gratitude to ward the young Marqu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

94 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Where before was hope and gratitude, now gloom set in upon every American heart. Arnold's defection had blighted .the gladness once flooding every patri otic soul. On all sides there was doubt, suspicion and a feeling of " Who shall next betray us! " as corps after corps was massed against them by their enemies. These feelings, at first en tertained by civilians, finally infected the army. Unfed, unclothed, an lodged, the troops at last became indig nant. They felt that Congress was culpably negligent of them, and rose up in mutiny at Morristown. The Pennsylvania line resolved to redress their grievances by marching to the seat of Congress and demanding justice. It was a perilous moment, and the danger was escaped only through the united pacificatory efforts of Lafayette, Colonel Laurens and General St. Clair. Thus the clouds of despair gathered above the cause of liberty as gathered the clouds of winter above the earth. To add to the hopelessness of the situ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 95 chief. To hour was to obey. Instantly, much to the annoyance of his troops, he took up his inarch to Baltimore. On the way ho put down a formidable mutiny by issuing a general order to the effect that any soldier who did not wish to share the danger with him could get permission to return, and thus be saved the shame of desertion. The effect was remarkable. A new spirit seized upon the troops and desertions ceased. Arrived at Baltimore he bor rowed, upon his own credit, ten thou sand dollars from the merchants of that city, and at once purchased material for clothing for his ragged little army. But buying material was one thing ; having it made into clothing was an other. In his extremity he besought the ladies of that city to employ their needles in the service of their country, and with such success that in a few days every fair hand in Baltimore was making garments for the soldiers en gaged in defending their common coun try. The writer of this, having the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

96 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Cornwallis was the most accomplished English officer in America. His troops far outnumbered those of Lafayette, and his military stores were greater. More than all, he was just and honor able, while his military genius had been marked from his youth. He had the utmost confidence in himself, as indeed every general should have, but this confidence was now his ruin. He underestimated his antagonist, and de clared that he " would bag the boy without trouble." At once he put forth active efforts. On the 24th of May he crossed the James at the head of eight thousand men, and advanced upon La fayette. Lafayette, having only four thousand undisciplined troops, fell back upon Richmond, but even there he was unable to make a stand. Removing the military stores, he retreated behind the Chickahominy, and retired to Fredericksburg. It was now a race. "Would the boy escape ? Could he evade his pursuer until re-enforcements arrived? Had he genius equal to that of the confi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 97 tnck. Baron Steuben joined Lafayette on the 19th, and that night Cornwallis evacuated Richmond, and began a re treat across the State. At once, though greatly inferior in numbers, Lafayette started in pursuit. At Kent's Court house his advanced corps came in con tact with Cornwallis' roar and urged the flight yet fiercer. Still, the English general continued his retreat. Suc cessively he fell back upon "VVilliams burgh and James River, resolving to retire to Portsmouth. While massed upon this river, intending to pass it, a sharp action took place in which ho again failed to entrap his young but wary adversary. The end was now drawing near. Cornwallis lay secure at Portsmouth, closely watched by Lafayette, who, though inferior in force, had success fully impressed the English general with the idea that he commanded an army superior in numbers to his own. In the meantime at New York, Wash ington, learning that the Count de Grasse had sailed to assist the Ameri ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

OS THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. troops against these distributors of death, only to find them driven back, hacked and beaten. The withering sheets of flame hurled upon his walls soon made them begin to crumble, while his ordnance was broken and dis dismounted. He saw the town could not be held, and on the night of the 16th crossed part of his army over to Gloucester Point. But even the ele ments were opposed to his escape. A storm of unusual violence broke down and stopped all further progress in that direction. He now gave up all hope of escape, and on the morning of the 17th offered to capitulate. On the 19th, articles of capitulation were signed, and American liberty was won. The surrender of Cornwallis was a theme of national rejoicing. Virtually it put an end to the war, and through out the world it was felt that one land existed wherein Man stood with un shackled hand before his Maker. Nor was there a lack of thanks ascending to God from the deep, fervent hearts of the Americans; and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 A CHRISTMAS STORY. CHAPTER I. HAJ.AXCrXO THE HOOKS. Tho Christmas Eve of 1873 was quite a disagreeable time for any one who had business on the streets of New York. Cold, indeed, was the wind that blew from the northwest and drove the blinding snow into tho face of any poor pedestrian, who found it necessary to be abroad. The moon was hid, and the light of the street lamp cast but a feeble glare through the sullen dark ness. About half past ten on this cold night, a woman was seen wending her way along the outer streets of the great city. She looked inquiringly into the windows, as if she sought some refuge from the inclemency of the weather. In her arms she carried a child, well wrapped in a dark shawl; while her own thin form wore tut little protective clothing. She walked along murmur ing such words as these : " I don't see what cause brother Tom has to hate poor Launcelott so bitterly. He is poor, but Tom always pitied the poor and the weak." Thus speakin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

100 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. half of kindness. To-night he was busily engaged settling his books. The young man was Tom McDermott. He was about six feet in height and of splendid proportions. To-night his dark blue eyes looked gloomy he looked sad. "Dennis," said he, "I have been a lucky man. Lucky in business, but yet I am sad. Five years ago to-night, Mary, my only sister left home. You know all about it, Dennis, still I must speak of it. Launpelott came to my house poor, ill and dying with the fever. He was talented and I made him the instructor of my orphan sister. He gained her affections and they were married against my wish. And as Mary had not reached the age to claim her fortune, it still remains in my hands. Husband and wife em barked for England, the ship was wrecked and I never heard more of poor Mary. Dennis, I would give my fortune to know that she yet lives and to see her again But her husband, he who abused my confidence, who forgot my kindness, Dennis, it is hard to for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

) THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 101 and. not to forgive was to stamp the future with the horrid cross of misery. Finally ho said, "No, Mary, I forgive you. I will protect you and your child, but I can not and I will not pardon him who so foully betrayed my confidence and who caused all this sorrow and misery. You can have your property, your money, my house is your shelter, but never Joseph Launcolott." Then said Mary in a subdued voice, that showed her love was striving hard, "Brother, unless you pardon my hus band you can not paraon me. The Holy Sacrament of Matrimony in our true Catholic and Apostolic church, I have become one body and one heart with him, and have likewise bound my destiny with him, and until death I shall not part with him. For what God hath joined together, lot no man put asunder.'' At this juncture Mrs. McDermott prayed her husband to relent and for give his dear sister and her husband. When Mr. McDermott saw the deep faith still in his sister's heart and for his own l...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

102 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of St. Fancis. Pupils 105; Comanche and Apache Indians. Antlers, I. T. ; teachers, Sisters of St. Joseph ; 80 pupils ; Choctaw In dians. Ardrnoro, I. T.; St. Agnes' Academy, teachers, Sisters of Mercy; 120 pupils, Chickasaw. Muskogee, I. T., St. Joseph's School; Sisters of St. Joseph; pupils J 45, Creeks and Cherokees. Purcell, I. T., St. Elizabeth's Con- Benedict Indian Industrial boarding school, Pottowotamio girls, conducted by Sisters of Mercy. It was the Benedictine Fathers who were instrumental in building the two large schools among the Osage Indians, one among the Chickasaws, another among the Comanches and Apaches. Of schools for the colored pupils there are two. The one at Guthrie, the capital of Oklahoma, is St. Catherine's school, conducted by the Benedictine Rt. Rev. D. Feli De fi basse, Abbot of Sacred Heart Abbey, Sacietl Hoart, Oklahoma. Probably thoro is uo ono bottor known or raoro generally loved throughout tho territory than Father Felix....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 103 & been substantially aided in their good work, by a charitable and philanthropic woman, Miss Catherine Droxel, of Phil adelphia, who by her work shows that she believes in helping to elevate and enlighten the benighted ones of her own country. The other Indian schools have been built by Right Rev. Bishop Meerschaert, of Guthrie. Of Catholic schools for the whites number of white people is 1004; Indi ans, 004; colored, 275. Total number of young people under Catholic care in Oklahoma and Indian Territory 1S83.. In 1S75, Rev. Father Isidore Robot came from France to America, and stopped in Atoka, I. T., for one year. He then, in 1876, selected the place where now stands the abbey, college and convent of Sacred Heart, O. T., which was built by him in 1877 1881. Group of I'ottawatomio Bojs of Sacred Heart Industrial Indian School. there are four. At Sacred Heart, O. T., is the Sacred Heart college, con ducted by the Benedictine Fathers; St. Mary's academy, c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1899

3 04 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. himself to the' hearts of these people is shown in ninny ways. He is Abbot of the Sacred Heart Abbey, and presi dent of Sacred Heart College, a par ticularly well-equipped place for the" training of young men. This institu tion was incorporated in 1895, by the legislature of Oklahoma, and is em powered to confer the usual degrees. The location is delightful and the col lege seems to possess all the attractions dear to the heart of a young man. There are literary societies, a brass band, or- ' chestra, base ball team, etc. On their calendar is given Washington's Birth day and Memorial Day, as well as St. ) Patrick's and St. Benedict's days. Be- f sides this college for white boys, which is adjoining the abbey, they have with in the Monastery a religious seminary in which young religious clerics are ed ucated in philosophy and theology for the priesthood. The opinion of these Fathers, who have worked so long and faithfully among the Indians is, that industria...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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