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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

THE MAIL BOX Continued from page 12. Editor and Staff, Enclosed is my subscription to your very interesting paper. Mr. C.D. Eames, Ferrum, VA sent me some copies, and I read them from front to back. I am 67 years old, born and raised on Mill Creek Mountain, in the foothills of the Ozarks. For this reason, I can relate to the articles and stories about life in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. As you can see by my name, I am especially interested in Floyd County. My grandfather always told me that four Floyd brothers came from England and settled in Virginia. This was in Colonial times. Later my branch of the family moved to South Carolina. My great-grandfather, George Floyd (1822-1902) was born near Spartanburg, SC, moved to Calhoun Georgia, then to Arkansas, with his large family, in 1&71. I would appreciate any arti- Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *B.OO Send A Gift! or 2 Y ear (24 Issues) Only $ 14.00...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1985 GEORGE IS A BIRD "No George. I don't want to feed birds." I had told George Scruggs time and time again, I had not time nor interest in feeding birds. But like a prevailing wind, every time I turned around George would ask, "Are you ready for me to bring you a bird feeder?" George Scruggs and his wife Susie adore birds. Behind their home in Arrington, Virginia, located on highway 29 about 30 miles north of Lynchburg, stands a Bluebird house, a Purple Martin house and three bird feeders. Not to mention sunflower seed lying on the window ledges and corn scattered all over the yard. It was nearly dusk when Susie chauffeured George into my driveway in the mountains of Nelson County, known for its beautiful apple orchards and the Crabtree waterfall, one of the highest in the east. Smoke was rolling from George's pipe when he and Susie stopped in front of the house. George lets Susie drive. That way George can concentrate more on talking. George greete...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

GEORGE IS A BIRD Continued from Page 14. they'll thrill your heart." He smiled, bid me farewell and was chuckling to Susie as their old Ford's tail light rounded the curve out of sight. I stared at the bird feeder for the longest time. I pulled up my collar as I glanced at the mountains and went inside. The snows did come. And with the snow came the birds. I have never seen so many types of birds in all of my life in one place. There were sparrows, finches, doves, thrushes, red birds, blue birds, black birds and birds I had never seen. Even a couple of rabbits occasionally dropped by to eat the corn the birds knocked out of the feeder to the ground. As birds flocked to "my" bird feeder I would grin because I knew I was doing something worthwhile. I had seen birds in flight all of my life, but when they're 20 feet from you it's different. I felt I had become their friend. I enjoyed keeping the feeder full and shoveling snow away from the base of the feeder. I'd blanket the ground wit...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1985 SWIMMING IN TUMBLING CREEK BY: MARY JOYCE PORCELLIN I suppose I went swimming many times as a young child, with the rest of my family, in Tumbling Creek, since it was a relativelypublic swimming hole. Despite the fact it was situated in a shady, wooded area along a dirt road back in the Blue Ridge Mountains. My first recollection, though, of being introduced to that clear, creek water was, at ten years old, when I was baptized. As the preacher blessed me then dunked me under I remember thinking it was definitely a good thing I had been saved. Because when I felt the shock of that creek's frigid temperature touching my warm skin, I thought sure I'd be meeting my Maker in just a few more minutes. But I managed to live long enough after that to actually look forward to the prospect of taking a dive into that chilly stream. The phrase "taking a dive", though, isn't exactly correct. The only person I ever saw brave enough to jump headfirst into Tumbli...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

ROAD MAKING Continued from page 1. equipment, crawler type tractors. ' They were the forerunners of catapillers, of which Best and Holt was one of the older companies. A typical road crew in those days consisted of one man on the crawler, one man on the grader and two men behind them with shovels. You could hear that operation coming before it got within sight. It was a big show for the kids to go out and watch. Early roads were narrow and fences were close to the roads. It was very difficult to pass another vehicle on those roads. The road grading created quite a problem. Everytime the roads were graded, the driver tried to get the blade over as far as possible to make the road a little wider. This cut into the road banks and the fences started falling in. Some farmers would get right bitter over it. It was a major grievance the landowners had with the state. Right after World War 11, there was a lot of pressure to get state road 799 paved. They were limited for funds for construct...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1985 THE LITTLE BOY WHO ASKED QUESTIONS (A STORY FOR NELSON) By: Beulah S. Fox Illustration by Pam Harris "Grandmuver, where's my quilt?" asked the five year old boy. Grandmother didn't know what to say. She had made his big sister an Album Quilt showing events in her life, thinking someday when the little boy was older, she'd make him a quilt. The little boy thought Grandmother could do anything, but he didn't think this was fair. Later Grandmother said to Pawpaw, "I feel badly about not having a quilt for him. I had planned to make him one when he got older. " Pawpaw said, "I don't know, he's done many of the same things that Jennifer has. It would be interesting for him to know who his ancestors were. He's ridden an airplane too. Remember how he likes all kinds of animals and how he enjoys special holidays and stories. I loved the way he wanted a calculator when he was in kindergarten. And how he said he had always wanted to sleep in a big bed and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAPER DOLLS BY: LOUIS SWEENY Margaret and I learned how to play with paper dolls by standing around watching our older sisters Zelle and Loma play with them when they were little Then, by the summer of 1923 when we were nine and ten, we began playing with them. We cut them out of mail-order catalogs. We made chairs for them by folding cardboard, cutting each end of the fold about an inch and folding the ends for legs and arms. We rounded off the legs of the chairs to make rockers. The beds were easy to make by just folding cardboard on each side. We played in an upstairs attic room. One day Mamma told us we were going to have to get that mess out of the house, to take them to the wood shed. That just suited us fine and we began moving. There was something like a balcony in the wood shed that was an ideal place to play. We had to climb up on a two-by-four to get up there, but we didn't mind that. There was nothing up there but a few mud-daubers flying in and out with balls of mud to ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1925 THE MOUNTAIN MAN AND THE PLAYER PIANO For some reason, my father always had a weakness for buying things he didn't need. Take for instance the time he bought a transmission for a 1939 Ford Coupe. At that time, our only means of transportation were a shakly wagon, a skid sled, and a pair of balky mules. What's more absurd, Dad spent seventy years on planet Earth and never learned to drive and automobile. Although Dad pulled "doozies" in his time, it was while we were living at Jeffersonville, Kentucky that he really topped himself. On July 10, 1948, he came home from an auction sale down around Mt. Sterling and proudly announced that he'd bought a Great Dane pup and a player piano. The dog part came as no surprise, but the player piano had all of us shaking our heads. We'd never heard of a player piano! "I made a fine deal, Georgia," Dad told Mama. "I got the piano for fifteen bucks and they threw in the pup fer a quarter." My pudgy mother's eyes ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

I VERY AND DORIS KIMBLE Continued from page 3. And we learnt to play kindly soft, healing music, something that wouldn't be too rowdy. We'd change away from the frolicing hoe-down style to a little more of a sentimental type and maybe do some ballads. There might be somebody in the crowd to sing a little bit, but mostly it was just music. We'd sit around and play til it looked like they was spirited a little bit. It would lift them a little bit and then we'd go in the kitchen and drink coffee and have chicken and pie and cake til we had to go home. I don't know if it was worth anything to the sick or not, but we got a lot out of doing it. And then too, we got to playing for dances. The dancers always had a favorite tune and they would tell us about how much pep they wanted in it. They said it had to be right - if it was too fast they couldn't dance it or if it was too slow, they couldn't Directly we'd hit off on one that would be just what they wanted and you talk about feet a-flyin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL AUGUST, 1985 BACKROADS- Continued from page 24. behind has forever left its mark on the people and place he loved for a lifetime. The story of his life has been recorded by Richard C. Davids in the nationally acclaimed book, "The Man Who Moved A Mountain". It is a story of tears and joy and his unquestionable love of mountain people. He was over thirty years old and the father of four children when he decided to become a minister. It was not an easy decision for a man with a wife and four children to make, and the fact that he did not have a high school education would have made the journey seem impossibly out of reach for most people. Bob Childress however, didn't think like most people. He had faced challenges all his life and the journey from the backwoods of Patrick County, Virginia to graduation exercises at Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, Virginia was only the beginning of an oddesy that was to change the spirit of a mountain. Most of the accomp...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 22. After stopping, we will turn left onto state road 626, beside the church. 12.7 (0.1) The small rock spring house here on our right once provided water to the church, manse, and the school. It also served as a meeting place for folks to gather before school and church services. 12.8 (0.1) The three story building on our left here was the Buffalo Mountain School. Classrooms were on the two lower floors and teachers roomed on the third floor. The beautiful old home on our right, past the school, was the manse where Bob Childress and his family lived. Today it is owned by his son Brian, who is pastor of Stone Memorial Church in Marion, Virginia and who also preaches every fifth Sunday at the Slate Mountain Church his father built. 14.8 (2.0) At this stop sign, we will turn left onto state road 627. There is an old two room schoolhouse on our left here. 15.0 (0.2) From this stop sign, we will turn left continuing on state road 627. 16.1 (1.1) At this sto...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 August 1985

fhe y K 1 W HEART OF THE BLUE RIDCE rAouniain A Copyright 1985 Laurel Publications Inc. AUGUST / 1985 Ms^ Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. On January 19, Is9o, a midwife by the name of Orlean Puckett assisted in the delivery of a baby boy to a poor mountain family living in a hollow nestled against the foot of the towering Blue Ridge. Aunt Orlean had helped deliver thousands of mountain babies, but none would have the impact on the Blue Ridge of the boy born that cold January night to Babe and Lum Childress. The child, Bob Childress, faced impossible odds from the day he was born. It was a lawless time of ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

September 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life Early Virginia Railroads ■ v h i 0 Wreck of No. 14 & 37. October 20, 1920, Rural Retreat, Virginia. Note open boxcar door on right of photo. There is a milk can there that wasn't even overturned during the wreck. The invention of the steam engine marked the beginning of the railroad age and the day of rapid transportation and communication. 1852 is generally accepted as the date of the coming of the railroad to southwest Virginia. This railroad opened transportation into Tennessee and eventually connected the Atlantic seaboard with the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico at New Orleans. Men began to dream of connecting by railroad the Atlantic and the Pacific coasts of the nation. This did begin to come about in 1862 with Congress passing legislation offering land rights and construction financial assistance to encourage the building of a trans-continental railline. As a result, the Union Pacific and the Southern Pacif...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 THE MOUNTAIN MAN AND THE PLAYER PIANO By: Robert G. Back CONTINUED FROM LAST MONTH. As we left our story last month, Dad had (without Mom's knowledge or approval) bought a player piano at auction. It is now installed in the home and ready for its first trial. Dad put one of the two rolls he'd gotten with the piano into its' small compartment in front and began to pump its' pedals. The entire house became filled with a rousing rendition of "The Yellow Rose of Texas". At least that's what Dad said it was. Evidently, a few keys had been knocked out of tune when the piano slid off the sled. "How do ya like' er now, Georgia?" Dad yelled above the racket. "I like it 'bout as much as I like snakes!" she yelled back. "That contraption is playin' notes sour enough to taste.!" Was she ever right! It was hitting notes that were trying their best to murder the musical scale. That didn't bother us kids, though. On the contrary..we loved it. The sight of tho...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

SHARE THE MOUNTAIN L POST CARD #V ZIZ With Someone Whose Heart Is In The Blue RidgeSend A Gift Subscription. Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life 1 Year (12 Issues) Only *B.OO Send A Gift! or 2 Y ear (24 Issues) Only $ 14.00 TELL US THE OCCASION (HAPPY BIRTHDAY, THINKING OF YOU, GET OF WELL SOON, ANNIVERSARY, HAPPY GRANDPARENTS DAY, WISH YOU WERE Q \ Onlv *1 ft 00 HERE) AND WE WILL SEND THE APPRO" ° I COX JOU LOSLLCS J VFHIY LO.UU PRIATE CARD. (CANADA AND ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES ADD SIO.OO PER YEAR Send Your Check Or Money Order To 0 COVER Subscrilersr"""' Mountain Laurel With each subscription we II send a free comRt. 1 plimentary copy to one of your friends. Meadows of Dan, Va. 24120 To subscribe, plus* fill out ttw blank below and send it, along with M.OO, to the Mountain Laurel, V To subscribe, please fill out the blank below and send it, along with SB.OO, to the Mountain Laurel, I Rt. 1, Meadows of Dan, Va. 24120 \ Rt. 1, Meadows of Dan, Va. 2...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 George Shelor's Steam Tractor And Memories Of The Old Huff Cannery ill* 311 ', * sg®sl&, ... %4" *if '*§&*, :,"Wv.. -'■■ *«* ** -MVA jl f flipfj I B <~ jWßa| • # is III* JSBP' / ,;%, JISMJ "l never did fire one of those old steam engines, but I've been around them enough to know how they work. There's right much of an art to it, a lost art of course. You had to know when to put the wood in it and what time to put water in it. I've heard the expression that it took a lazy man to be a good fireman because if you were too eager and put too much wood in, you'd drown the thing down; it wouldn't burn. There were a lot of hazards to a steam engine, like sparks, particularly when they were using it for thrashing. It could be highly combustable and present a problem especially in the fall with dry grass and straw around. Steam engines could also be a danger when they were used at sawmill sites. Once, my father was doin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Continued from Page 4. The Huff Cannery. cracks in the floors, finding something wrong. In other words, they didn't care nothing about the beans anymore. Everybody had a full stomach. The war was over and they were getting their food somewhere else. The economy was good. The inspectors pressured Huff to put in a better building, but Huff could see the handwriting on the wall. After that, the cannery went out. It went up for sale and my brother bought half on one side of the creek and I bought the other half. When I got back from World War II my motto was, 'Any land that you couldn't get to safely with a tractor, wasn't suitable for farming, was to be put out in trees. Some of the land was pretty steep. I kindly got the feel ox tree planting and it's been something that I've been interested in ever since. I've set trees all over the county. When I first bought my tree planter, the state came up here from Salem, Va. and looked at it. They were real interested in it cause they had neve...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL 1842-1848 The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1842 (she was 17 then) til her death in 1848. At this point in the story, she is married and she and her husband have traveled to Texas to start a life together only to find the situation there untolerable. They are traveling again back up the Mississippi River to homestead in Missouri. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing this journal with us. June 10th. [1846] Day before yesterday we came aboard the [unreadable], a large boat, 300 feet long, met some English people. Yesterday felt miserable hopeless and hungry. Today put on clean clothes, had mutton for breakfast, hemmed my shawl. Feel better and happier than I have for weeks. The boat is starting. We have all kinds of people on deck, finer than I have seen on deck before - people from every quarter of the globe. I hear the fiddle beating time...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

Olden Golden Rule Days This is the start of a column that will run for the next several months about different aspects of old timey schools from recess to spelling bees. We hope you enjoy it. Genealogical research has revealed to me that many of my ancestors and relatives were school teachers (my father, his father, his grandfather, his great grandfather, numerous aunts, uncles and cousins), teaching in oneroom and two-room schools in the southwestern section of Virginia and sometimes in the northwestern North Carolina area. These dedicated souls surmounted many obstacles in pursuit of their teaching careers. The automobile had not yet supplanted horse-drawn vehicles, making travel a hardship in order to obtain the necessary education. I have often heard my father recount his feelings of determination and the many miles he walked because of his choice of a teaching vocation. After obtaining their teaching certificates, many of these teachers found it necessary to move for the winter...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 5 September 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1985 By: Ivalien Hylton Belcher As you drive along Highway in the Lovers Leap Mountain section of the Blue Ridge in Virginia, you might spot a tiny gray cottage by the side of the road. In the summer pretty flowers bloom in the yard and hanging baskets adorn the porch. Many times you will see a spry lady going about her daily chores or sitting on the porch churning butter. One fine day in July I stopped there for a visit with Mrs. Delia Martin. Sitting in her neat living room, she chatted and I took notes. "I was born at the old Jim Williams place near Stuart, Virginia. My parents were Green and Elsie Hubbard Martin. Later my father bought the Jake Williams place and I lived there until I married. I met my husband, Edgar Martin at a dance in Murrary Williams' home. Dances in those days were about the biggest form of fun we had. We had to walk everywhere we went back then, but there were good times. I played the autoharp a lot in my courting days. Af...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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