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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Chemistry and its Applications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Chemistry and its Applications. [Prof. Ezua S. Cabr before the Mechanic Arts ColLKQB, Mechanics' Institute Hall, 8. F. lteported expressly for the Pbemb.] Waler—Extraordinary Properties. Lect. 111. Mar. 4.—1 remember hearing many years ago, said the Professor, the composition of a school-boy on Water. " Water," it was said, "is a very useful thing for vessels to sail on, for ducks to swim in; it is very useful to wash with and to cook with; and in some countries it is used to drink." This was many years ago. Now, doubtless, the writer would say, that if it was not used largely to drink, it is found very useful for adulterating drinks. Water is a very common substance. It covers nearly three-quarters of the surface of the globe. It exists in plants and animals. Three-quarters of our bodies consist of it. It forms much the largest proportion of all organs. It is a most essential material, for many of the elements required to form substances must be brought into the closest contact wit...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Neuralgia. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Neuralgia. [Written tor the Phkss.] Neuralgia, from the Greek words neuron, (nerve) and algos (pain), is, as its name indicates, a condition of disease, in which pain of a sharp, darting, lancinating character is felt along the course of a nerve. Neuralgia is confined entirely to sensory nerve tissue. In pure neuralgia, there is neither tenderness upon pressure, inflammation, discoloration of the skin over the painful spot, nor swelling. But on the contrary, there is a feeling of coldness, and a desire to apply pressure which often affords partial relief. Whenever there is heat, swelling or tenderness upon pressure over the painful nerve, the neuralgia is either associated with gout or rheumatism; or else, the pain has induced a secondary inflammatory action. Any sensory nerve may be involved; yet, the branches of the fifth pair, which spread over the sides of the head and face, are the ones most commonly affected. Any part of the body which is traversed by sensory nerves may be the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Gold and Legal Tender Rates. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Gold and Legal Tender Rates. San Francisco, Wednesday, Mar. H.IHTI. I,epal Tenders buying <B>9o>G; selling C*'Jl- Hold in New York to-day 111 V 4.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. Having introduced the Martha Grape into our vineyard, we have hung np a epeoimen bunch as a sign at our front door. In connection therewith is to be found a crop of California i Raisins, while close at hand the Alvarado Sugar Factory is grinding away. Giving body to these sweets, are the Notes on Mechanical and Scientific Progress, solid food, yet made easy of digestion. The Notes on Tuolunine and Calaveras counties are also interesting anil curious in part. Philo Sophos indulges in some questions concerning Right and Left —a sort of peripatetic lecture. From Stockton comes some really Good Ad- j vice from an Experienced Fanner, which is ; well worth heeding. The Resources of the country around Stockton are spoken of, and from still further south, from Tulare county, conn reports of experiments in Wheat Culture. Theu there follow the Agricultural Notes from the whole coast. The Inventors' oomer is well tilled, and circular items and are given as near to the corner a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. This Board ocoupiea one of tho most important and responsible positions in the State. No central committee of a political organization; no board of underwriters, or directors of any insurance or railroad company; no board of trustees of any savings bank, or commissioners of common schools or other organization in the State occupies a more important and responsible position than the State Board of Agrieulu re. It has to deal with the most important Mid delicate questions, relating to the wellbeing of that industry which lies at the foundation of all other industries of the State. Upon its action on the Annual Fair of the industrial products of the State, held under the auspices of this Board; upon the reports which go forth to the i world from these fairs, through the press and otherwise; and upon the Annual Reports of the Board itself, concerning the ! industries of the State and her resources j and their development, depends the material reputation a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Penalty for In-breeding Universal. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

The Penalty for In-breeding Universal. The penalty for in-breeding begins to overtake us, in the vegetable kingdom. From the Petaluina papers we learn that some strange insect is eating u}> the growing wheat crops. "We wonder that this penalty has not come sooner, for our imposition on the soil by eternal succession of wheat after wheat. "We may look on this as a product of disease. No doubt the vine insect comes from unceasing use of the pruning knife which imi>oses a heavy yearly drain on the resources of the plant. Potatoes in unbroken succession suft'er a similar penalty. The apples of California are showing a general decay in the seed chambers, pittiness and sponge spots are also consequences of in-breeding. Most of our fruit trees are from stock in the Eastern States, already constitutionally weakened, by long succession of grafting from certain favored varieties. Disease is long suffering in our State. In "the vegetable kingdom, as in man, the outward de...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HEDGE OR LIVE FENCES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

HEDGE OR LIVE FENCES. In any country where wood is scarce, (and it seems to be getting scarce the world over,) in these days of railroading, wharf building, etc., it becomes a question of no small moment to the agricultural interests to find some substitute for rail, or post and board fences. In this State the expense of fencing land is getting to be one of serious consideration to the farmers. It is operating as a serious drawback to the j agricultural interests, and indirectly to all others. There are but few of our good agricultural districts furnished with a sufficiency of good fencing timber near at hand. Most! of the lumber for boards and fences, has to be transported from high up on the Sierra Nevada mountains, or from the timber districts of Oregon, and the coast still farther north. All or very nearly all the timber for posts, comes from a few of the coast counties. Thus our agriculturists, in all the great central portions of the State, are not only compelled to lniy most ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE MAYWOOD ROAD SCRAPER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

THE MAYWOOD ROAD SCRAPER. A good scraper is a very useful instrument, and one which, by its simplicity and cheapness, is peculiarly adapted to the wants of farmers, road makers, and all others engaged in excavating, grading around buildings, etc. The instrument, as generally made, however, is rather unhandy and bungling, compared to the one, an illustration of which is herewith presented, and which is simply a modification of the various forms long in use; but its variations make it a really more efficient and easily worked instrument. It is claimed that one man can do twice as much with this as with one of the ordinary machines. By reference to the illustration, it will be seen that the mode of draft is decidedly improved, by which it is more easily operated and not at all liable to become tangled in the traces. The draft being from the extreme ends, and from behind and below the cutting blade, it cuts its way into hard ground without any liability to tilt or turn over. The chain e...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
WHAT AUNT MARY SAYS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

WHAT AUNT MARY SAYS. A STORY BY NELL VAN. [Written for the Pbess.] "Come Delia, take a doughnut," said my Aunt Mary as I passed through her kitchen when she was frying the most delicious looking cakes you ever saAv. Now if there is anything I do like, it is a nice, hot doughnut; so, notwithstanding my scruples against such things, I yielded to her entreaties and helped myself to one of the delicate, crisp beauties, whose plump aides were of that delicious brown so inviting to the dyspeptic. •'ts'nt that good ?" said my Aunt "and I don't believe it will hurt you to eat one of my sort of doughnuts once in a while. You know there is neither butter nor hogs' lard in them." "Indeed" said I "how do yon make them, Aunt ? and what do you fry them in ?" "Well, Delia, I seldom make such things in these days, as you know, for I do not believe in young folks and children eating cake! Pies are much better for them, in my opinion; that is, the pies I make. These cakes are wet up with cream and *&...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ROLLER SKATING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

ROLLER SKATING. O 'tis jolly fun, this skating, This whirling round on wheels, This turning, twisting, falling; How gay and nice one feels, To see upon the glassy floor A score of tender mates; Dear me! but ain't it jolly fun, This courting girls on skates. Oh! the nidsand nadfl together Scoot round line loving mates; 0, gracious! ain't it jolly fun This flirting round on skates. You bump against a maiden form, She screams, but ain't it fun To see her look you through, '' ltecover arms '' and run; You follow —but she's far too fleet, Which makes you curse the fates— But never mind, 'tis jolly fun, This chasing girls on skates. You take a timid damsel To teach her—that's no sin— But, somehow or other. Her skates keep turning in. You stop, and stoop to fix her strap, (An office no one hates) When along a burly novice comes And bumps you off your skates. And now another miss appears And sweetly asks your aid: "Just take me round the hall but once, I'm not a bit afraid!" You gather all ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

An Eloquent Extract. —They tell us that the influence of the Christian religion is declining; that it will after a while expire from the enlightened world; that it is all of life to live and all of death to die. Ah, reader! You and me know better. We hear the cold, hopeless blasphemy angrilly contradicted by the viewless prophets within the sanctuaries of our own souls. We look upon the white, still face of an infant in its ooffln, and cannot believo that its sleep, though dreamless, is eternal. It cannot be that God has created one so beautiful, so innocent, so sinless, to fade and depart like the vapor of the morning, and be lost in the dreadful vortex of annihilation. The fairest flower that is ciit down by the frost, the serest leaf that is whirled to the dust in the gales of autumn, is restored at the next uprising of the year; and shall not that little one como back to life; not in speechless pallor; not in the wan similitude of death, but warm and exultant from the sheltering...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A MOTHER'S RESPONSIBILITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

A MOTHER'S RESPONSIBILITIES. JEWELL [Written for the Press.] Did it ever occur to the mothers of our race, that much of the sickness among children, is owing to their ignorance of tho laws of health and life? Or that it might be wholly avoided, or greatly lessened, by a few serious thoughts and hours of study? Look at it, for a moment:—The girl of eighteen marries, without a thought but that she leaves behind her all the cares and troubles of her previous life, and never dreaming of those which come to every wife. She of course steps into the fire, ' from the frying pan! And when the newborn babe —a bundle of love, embroidery and flannel, is laid in her arms, she feebly accepts it as a gift from God; little dreaming that God expects a big return for such gifts. The story of that baby-hood, is the story of hundreds. Poor, young mother, and poor baby! Innocence is punished by ig-^ norance, and both suffer. Its teething is greatly aggravated by its manner of dress; bare arms and neck; ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOUSEHOLD READING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

HOUSEHOLD READING.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Industry. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Domestic Industry. As the forest furnishes timber, and the quarry stones in the rough, which must be hewed and polished before either is fit for use; so Nature, cultivated, furnishes food, which art must dress and prepare, before it is suitable for the palate or digestion; and so essential to our welfare and happiness is this preparation, that we have ever wondered why such work was so persistently made menial. It requires no elaborate reasoning to show that every mother, Avife and daughter should become a practical worker in the domestic circle. The days for romance have passed, the night for dreamy visions of elegance and luxury, in connection with a life of idleness, is, or should be giving 2>laee to the dawn of industry and utility. It is Avell that woman should be queen in the parlor; but she should also be able, if need be, to be queen in the kitchen. The more gracefully she is able to perform the duties of mistress of an establishment; with so much the loA-elier gr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Make Your Own Soap. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Make Your Own Soap. Every farmer and every family, indeed, has a large amount of grease and drippings, more than enough to make all the soap needed for the family. The manufacture of your soap is a great piece of economy, and it is easily done—even to nice toilet, fancy and shaving soap. We append hereto How to do It. Take the best hard wood ashes, which must be kept dry while saving them. When put in the hopper, mix a bushel of unslacked lime with ten bushels of ashes; put in a layer of ashes; then one slight sprinkling of lime; wet each* layer with water —rain or river water is best. A layer of straw should be put upon the bottom of the hopper before the ashes are put in. An opening in the side or bottom for the ley to drip through, and a trough or vessel under to receive the ley. When the ley is strong enough to bear up an egg, so as to show the size of a dime above the surface, it is ready for making soap: until it is, pour it back into the hopper, and let it drip through again....

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Get Rid of Rats. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

How to Get Rid of Rats. Somebody has sxiggested, what we should think might be a very effective, safe and economical method of getting rid of rats. If it works well with rats, why not equally well with gophers ? Will some one try it for both purposes and report success or otherwise to the Rural, for the benefit of others. Put potash in their holes and paths. The rats will get it on their feet and over their fur, then lick it, not liking the taste of it, as it burns them somewhat. The more they see of it the less they like it, so they clear out almost as soon as the application is made. Somewhat similar to the above, and also safe, has been suggested as follows : To rid your premises of rats, powder the holes well with dry cayenne pepjier. It will get into the eyes and nose, and the same rats will never be seen there again. Mice may be treated in the same manner. And why not gophers and squirrels ? To Clean Black Cloth.—Dissolve one ounce of bicarbonate of ammonia in one quart of war...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Domestic Receipts. An Extra Dish.—Oranges peeled and divided at the natural partings; three whites of eggs, for two oranges, beaten to a stiff froth, and the pieces of orange slipped in. Then thickly dusted with sugar and uaked. Geeman Loaf Cake. —Make a sponge the evening before you wish to bake the cake, of a tea-cupful and a half of milk, and as much flour stirred into it as will form a thick batter, with a little salt and one gill of good yeast. In the morning this sponge should be light. Then beat a quarter of a pound of butter with half a pound of sugar, until light. Add to it two tablespoonsful of cinnamon, a pound of dried currants. Put the whole into the sponge, with flour enough to form a soft dough. Butter a pan, and, when it is light, bake in an oven about as hot as for bread. To Dress Cold, Underdone Beei\ — Cut it in thick slices; season well with pepper and salt; dredge with flour, fry in hot lard to a light brown. Then take the slices out of the lard, lay them in a s...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Mechanical Hints. Absorption of Bricks. —A dry common brick will absorb at least a pint of water. Pressed brick will not absorb one=half as much, being harder and more compact. From this fact one can form some idea of the amount of moisture retained in a brick after a heavy shower, or more especially during the rainy season. Paint fills the pores of the brick, and forms a covering or metallic coating which effectually prevents absorption. Varnish for Shoes.—-Put a quarter of a pound of gum shellac, broken up in small pieces, in a pint bottle, cover it with alcohol, cork it tight, and put it on a shelf in a warm place; shake it well, several times a day, then add a piece of camphor, half as large as an ordinary sized hen's egg; shake it well and in a few hours shake it again, and add half an ounce of lampblack. If the alcohol is good, it will be dissolved in three days; then shake and use. If it gets too thick, add alcohol, pour out two or three teaspoonsful in a saucer, and apply it...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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