ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Preston Leader Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 15,083 items from Preston Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
15,083 results
NATURE RESERVES [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

NATURE RESERVES If we could go back a hundred years we should find many birds and plants which are now extinct, or learly so, comparatively common in this country (writes II.F',S, in "Thle Westminster Gazette"), No one seems to have thought of the creation of nature reserves for their protection or for any application of the law to close seasons, xcept for game, And so birds like tile hoopee and the ori ole, the harrier And the crested grobe and tile buzzard, are now unknown in many parts of the country where they were once common, This brings ms to the point of this article, which is to call attention to the new society for tile promotion of nature reserves which has just been formed with the Right lIon, J, W. Lowther as its pre sident, and many distinguished scien tists and ornithologists and botanists on its council. The aim of the society Is to add to the number of nature reserves whlich have already been formed by the Na tional Trust.. These are too few and far between to prese...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN SUFFRAGE DEMAND FOR GOVERNMENT MEASURE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

WOMAN SUFFRAGE DE.MAND FORI GOVERNMNENT 1 EASURE, (By Mrs M. G. Fawcett, in "Daily: News and Leader.") All the suffrage societies, whatever thel:' fundamental differences as to me thods, are now agreed that in order to obtain the object which they have in common a Government measure is a necessity. They are unanimously of the opinion that a private member's Bill is no good, and that those who ,ould persuade them to the contrary, at this stage in the history of the move ment, are simply trifling with the sub Ject. All that can be done to promote vwomen's suffrage by means of private members' Bills has been done. I will not say it has been useless: far from it. It has been good, for purposes of propaganda, to draw attention to the fact that "the people" consist of men and women, and that to enfranchise only one half of "the people" is a very im perfect and lop-sided interpretation of democracy; the meetings in support of the various private members' Bills and the debates upon them in ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GIRLS AS JUDGES COMMUNITY RUN BY CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

IR1LS AS JUDGES COMM1UNITY RUN BY CLIIIDRIN. A London magistrate was present when the court of the Little Common wealth at Flowers Farmn, Batcombe, sat at the week-end to investigate certain charges which had been brought against the citizens of the unique com Inunlty amongst the hills of Dorset shire (says the Dorchester correspon dent of the "Daily Chronicle"). In this community a number of chil dren-whose characters are not unble mished, they having been sent to the farm from various juvenile courts throughout the country-are framing their own laws, administering their own punishments, devising their own stall dards of conduct, and evolving at sys temin of life unchecked by any authority beyond that exerted by their own pub lic opinion. They have a judge - it girl of 13-and the Commonwealth con stable is by no Inoans physically the most poweful inmate of tile farm; in deed, it is recorded that on the night of his appointment he was requested to see that a delinquent retired to be...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FRANCOIS CELLIER DEAD CONDUCTED GILBERT-SULLIVAN OPERAS. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

FRANCOIS CELLIER DEAD CONDUCTED GILBERT-SULLIVAN OPERAS, One by one the famous band that in one way or another were responsible for the Savoy operas is dwindling (says "ldloyd's Weekly News' of January 11). Sir W. S. Gilbert, the librettist; Sir Arthur Sullivan, the composer; Mr R. D'Oyly Carlo, the producer, and several of the famious actors and actresses have crossed the border: and now Mr Francols Cellier, who conducted the orchestra, has gone. Mr Cellier died on Monday at his residence at Crane's Park, Kingston, at the age of sixty four. Francois Collier was the youngest of three brothers, all of whom made their mark in music. Of far wider range was the work achieved by Al fred Cellier, the oldest, the well-known composer of the Immensely popular opera, "Dorothy" (which, scarified by all the critics on its production, became one of the greatest successes of its time), and of such serious music as his setting of Gfay's "Elegy." Cellier began his connection with the Gilbert and Su...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN EMPIRE BUILDER WILLIAM CHARLES WENTWORTH [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

AN EMPIRE BUILDER WILLIAM CHARLBS WENTWORTH (By James Munro, in "United Enpire.") William Charles Wentworth was born in 1793 on Norfolk Island. Ills father was an Irish gentleman who had come out to New South Wales as an army medical onficer three years before, and had been stationed in the little sub colony 1200 miles to the north-east. Young Wentworth was educated in England, at Greenwlch and at Peter house, Cambridge, Before he went to the University, however, lihe took part, at the age of twenty, in the first great Inland exploration in New South Wales, which had till then been confined to a coast strip less than forty miles wide. The valleys of the Blue Mountain range had led nowhere, but Went t\orth's party (seven men in all, under the leadership 'of Gregory Blaxland, passed along the crest of the hills, from the Nepean to the Bathurst Plains, watered by two rivers named after thO Governor of the day, Lachlan Mac quarle, The Wentworths were grea: favorites of the Governor, and...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LACE-MAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

LACE-MAKING, Lace, us we now undere land the term, was not made until the end of the sixteenth century; but nettings, drawn-thread work and elaborate em broiderles have been found which date back as far as early Fgyptllan, Graeco-Roman and Anlo-Saxoa tinmee. The most exquisite examples of what we may call modern lace date froi the time of the Renaissance, that wonderful period when all men's pow ers seemed suddenly to galn new life and vigor, and it is really no exas geratlon to say that the lace then pro duced was the finest the world has seen. Tradition has It that Queen Kath erine of Aragon was the first to in. troduce the art of lace making as then known Into the Midlands, whilst !liv ing in retlrement at Ampthill, Poy', unfortunate queen! She passed the dark days while the question of her divorce was beilg fougv't out "in working with the needle curiously," and so keen was her interest in her humble pupils that at one time when money was scarce and "times bad," she burnt all he...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MODERN EDUCATION ADDRESS BY MR BRYCE [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

MODERN EDUCATION ADI)IESS IIY MR BRYCE The Right lion. James Bryce, upon whom a viscountcy was conferred at the New Year (says "The Daily Tele graph," of January 3), yesterday open ed the Conference of Educational AIs socilations at the University of Lon don, and in the course of his inaugural address made an earnest plea for the teaching of the Ulble in the schools. Heo also put before the delegates many suggestions of topics which deserved consideration, asking them, in conclu sion, wily Enlglish youths employed abroad showed less interest in their work than their foreign competitors; This question he did not answer, but he left it to his hearers as a matter deserving careful thought. . Some idea of the importance of the conference mnay be gained fromn tile fact that at it are represented numerous ianluential educational bodies, among them being the Art Teachers' Guild, the Associations of Assistant Mistress es, Science Teachers, University Women 'I'eachrs, and Teachers of Domesti...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FAMOUS YACHT A RECORD VOYAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

FAMOUS YACHT A RECORD VOYAGE. A splendid yachting voyago was completed (itays the lomlnltay corros liondent of "The Dally Telegraph" of January 9) with the arrivhal of Lord Brassey at Bo3mbay in his famous yacht Sunbeam. Lord 3Brussey is the father of Lady Willingdon, wife of the Governor of Bombay, and their Excellencies boarded the yacht to greet him, The Sunlhbeam left Marseilles on Nu vember 29. Sihe encountered a furious gale on nearinlg Port Said, which the yacht rode out well, but the voyage from Allen to llllmbay was a triumph. The distance in 1800 milles, and the yacht covered it in 10 days s hours under sails only, without using her engines. Lord l'russey, in an inter viow, declared that such t perfornlLace was never done before, and would never be again. FOO'r-STONI'3. It.L.P. It' Melnory of Thlie ieveroud Laurence Sterne, M.A., Iteitor of Coxwouldl, Yorkshire, Born November 24th, 1713. Died March 18th, 1769, T'he Celebrated Author Of "Tritrnam Shandy" 14 Aud "The Soutlin...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TITLED PAUPERS [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

TITLED PAUPERS Somle persons imagine that because a man possesses a titlo he lemust nleCes earity be rich (says "Time Ulaluow We\\'ekly Herald." Never was a greater nllstakllo made, 1 More than one noble nlan has inherited a name of great dis tinctiun, but he also inherited a largo number of debts. With proplerty inort ga;ged and no ready money to meet pigssing claims, his position is dis tinctly unenviable. Of course, amona cGr peers there are a largo number of very wealthy men, but, on the other halnd, many of the great people whose names you see in the Society colaumns of newspapers front time to time are nothing more than "titled paupers" many of them relatively poorer than the humblest wage-earner. Theirs is a constant fight with poverty, which in their case Is a social crime, Almost' every day they are confronted with one problem-how to make ends llleet In such a way that It will not be neces sary for them to forego any of the lux uries or pleasures to which they im agino they...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SECOND THOUGHTS THE REFORMED CHARACTER [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

SECOND TilOUflilTS THE REFORM El) CHIARACTERI (By 'V, Pett Iudge, in "The Westmin ster Gazette.") A distinct amount of swaggering characterised his gait as he came down the road, and the manner in which he removed a pebble that stood in the way indicated proud determina tion, He patted, more than once, the front of his blue serge jacket to make surd that contents of an Inside pocket were safe, "My responsibility," he said, half tloud, "will soon be at an end." The small numbers on the doors were of brass and use of chatlois ,eather made them glisten in the sun dhine. Ralsing the knocker of a cot 'ago to give one delinite knock, he abserved that he had mistaken a 3 eor an S. ile went back for the space ,f live houses. "That's my name," said the old lady, with reserve, "but I can't ask you in side because, to tell you the fact, I'm :urning out one of the rooms, What have you called about ?" "\Working up north," replied the young man, "for the last three months, and I've been on chummy...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Way It Worked. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

The Way It Worked. "What do you do when people come In and bore you?" a warm per sonal friend asked of a merchant. "When they stay too long the office boy, who is very bright and knows just when to Interfere, tiells me that a gentleman is in the counting. house waiting to see me on import ant business," "IHa! ha! That's a capital way to get rid of bores who don't know-" Just then the boy opened the door and sang out: "Gent in the countin'*. house, sir, waiting to see you on inm portant business." Reputation may be a meore bubble, but it makes an awful mess when it bursts. The right kind of a farmer will not put his wife to the trouble of asking to go with himn to the oity now ani again when he goes. Instead, he will steal a march and insist upon her going, which will please lher very much,11

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EYES AND CHARACTER. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

It is EYES AND CHARACTER, d. Most birds of prey, like most I al vages, have eyes of the darkest hi ig (says Dr, Leonard K, Hirshberg e- the San Francisco "Examiner"). Ti a gives their fierce natures an add e" ferocity, The evolutionists expla is the predominance of the black a g, brown eyes 'by pointing to the ,f that the most vigorous savages a s. most powerful animals have the mn hence it is a question of the survi, Id of the fittest. !e In a mwild state of nature the bl o" eye is a handicap. It does not k, cur among the uncivllised hum at tribes, and ,but seldom among t n" brute creatures. One savant ma tains that the degree of civilisati ie and effeminacy present in any race e directly proportional to the num: e of blue eyes present. x. Consider for a moment the varne is emotions to which man is subje ?r Think of the great number of rat ns there are with regard to the color id the skins. There are dark skinni y red skinned, copper skinned, bro, *e skinned, black skinned, yellow ...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TRUNK AND A TROUGH. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

A TRUNK AND A TROUGH, "An elephant of mine," said an an imal trainer, "has been taught to pump the trough in his winter quar ters fuill of water every morning. O0d MXowgll showed his sense the other day, It was like this: One of the logs supporting the trough had got dis placed. The trough slanted, and as fast as 'Mowgli pumped the water In, it ran out to the floor. I watched himi to see what he'd do. lie pulimped away for a long time before lie noticed anything wrong, Then he left the pump and came and nosed the trough over, grunting discontentedly. The thing was still empty; so lie turned to the pump again, Twice lie stopped pumping; twice he studied the trough, Then, of a sudden, he gave a sharp, quick trumpet. He saw what the trouble was, and with a thrust of his trunk lie dislodged the other log, and the trough rested, flat and level again, on the ground, Now, without any difficulty, it could ,be filled; and Mlow. gi, with a grunt that said, 'There! I've settled that difficulty...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WE SWANKED ON NOTHING. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

WE SWANKED ON NOTHING. When Jim 'and I were first married I daresay we were over-careful about money, To begin with, we hadn't much, and when two young people start housekeeping, however carefully they settle just what things they must have and what these are going to cost, other expenses always crop up, and there isn't much left of the savings at the end of it all, So naturally they start by being as economical as pos sable, Then the children came, and we had to think three or four times over every penny for a bit. But after a few years, when George and Mary were old enough to go to school, things bo gan to look up, For one thing, Jim left the foundry and took up with motors, and made very good money, Then my grand mother died and left me fifteen pounds, as I'd always been her favor. ite, And finally Jim put up for the District Council and got elected, so that he felt we ought to make' a bit more of a show than we had done in the past. First of all, we must needs move out of the co...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why the Horse Laughed [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

Why the Horse Laughed "I ,was in a county court the oth day," said the seedy-looking cabmla "and I heard one of those solicitt chaps say, 'People don't seem to unde ยท stand that the only thing necessary keep a horse from kicking when I D Is down is to get hold of his ear ai keep his nose up In the air. A hort cannot kick when his nose is In ti air. I have seen a lady keep a hor g quiet that way without soiling h gloves.' 'What's good enough for o lady,' says I, 'is good enough for mi and I tried it experimental.like, i stead of sittin' on his 'ead," S "W\ell," remarked the attentive lis ener, "did the horse kick?" j "Not a bit! Hio seemed so tickl with the idea that he couldn't stir f Inffin'! nut I think I shall sit on i

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE EFFICIENT WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

THE EFFICIENT WOMAN, Just so soon as women appreciate that being a woman is being the most desired thing in the world, just so soon as they reallse that efficiency is the strongest bulwark between themselves and the world, at that moment will the weak, dawdling women stop playing at being women and ,work to make themselves women in earnest. They will make a busi. ness of being women, just as a man makes a business of being a banker or a tailor. Efficiency will do more to solve the divorce problem than any number of laws.

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Care of the Litter. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

the first time." Care of the Litter, " if ihe litter Is strong and hardy, shoulid be ready for weaalng wh six weeks old. Generally, there a one or two youngsters iu the lift which do nrt, grow so well as t others, and it is advisable and p fltable to let these remain with t sow for a week or two longer. Wh pa igs reach the age of five or : months, if intended for fattenh they should be confined instead s being allowed to run about, which a good system for breeding sos They may be fed on any of the 1 S roducts of the farm, along with t

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Blissful Ignorance. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

'ead next time, all the same." Bliosful Ignorance. A man went to a j dge and aski a whether he could, bring a suit ; slander against a ',an who had call h'im a rhinoceros., "Why, no," said the judge. "B when did he call you that?" "Aboeit three years ago." "Three years ago! And you only Ju complain?" ' "But, your honor, yesterday I we In Iha rnn Pnrid RsW i ll ahijnllners

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ART OF CARVING. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

THE ART OF CARVING. Carving is an art, as every house wife knows, and especially those who, now and again, have experienced the vexation of seeing the joint so much "hacked about" by the unskilful car. ver that the only resource left was to mince the meat. The good carver alms at two things-to serve all as nearly equally as possible, with due attention, of course, to personal pre* ferences for "under-done," ",well. done," not fat, and the rest, and-to leave the joint in a neat condition, fit to return to the table, if needed, An, expert on carving gives the fol lowing very useful detailed instruc. tions:- A loin of veal should be started at the small end and the ribs cut apart and served with a piece of the kid. ney and fat on each plate, A breast of veal should be sepitrat ed from brisket, and both cut in pieces, If loins of veal and mutton are Jointed by the 'butcher they will be more easily carved. A leg of mutton should be carved across the middle of the bone first, and then fro...

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What the Squatter Did. [Newspaper Article] — Preston Leader — 21 March 1914

What the Squatter Did. "Persons putting their cows in amongst my milifors will be prosecut ed," was once put up on a tree near a gate of the inimitable Squatter Don nor, of Wanneroo. "The joke was," said Squatter, "that I didn't have any milkers In the paddock nor anywhere near it." "What was the use of the sign?" asked Jimmy Spiers, "It made them think there was good feed around there," explained Squat teler, "and they immediately put their cows in." "With what immediate result?" deo manded Jimmy, "I Immediately milked them," said Squatter,

Publication Title: Preston Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x