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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ABOUT RIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ABOUT RIGHT.   Edith: Look, papa; now are you satisfied with my report? Art and music, good; astronomy, physics, and chemistry, very good; logic, excel- lent— Papa: I am much pleased with the report. Likewise with the method of your teacher, and also with your prospects for the future. Now, if you can only get a young man that understands housework, has a smattering of cooking, knows how to embroider, and perhaps understands even to run the sewing machine, I think you can look forward to a serene and happy married existence.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A HOUSEBREAKER OF ELEVEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A HOUSEBREAKER OF ELEVEN.       A case heard at the Middlesex (Eng.) Sessions at the end of November showed that the sym- pathy of a jury may be sometimes misplaced. Harry James Cox (16) and Charles Pettifer (14) were indicted for breaking into the Wood-green Schools, and stealing money. The jury returned a verdict of guilty, and ex- pressed sorrow at seeing such young boys in the dock, and suggested that perhaps the younger lad had been led away by the elder. Mr. Littler: I am afraid it will be found that it is the other way round, gentlemen. The Clerk (to Pettifer) You are further charged with having been convicted at Wood-green Petty Sessions of breaking and entering a dwelling house. Do you remember that?—No answer. Mr. Littler: You were whipped. You remem- ber that, I hope?—Yes, sir. Mr. Littler: He was 11 then, gentlemen.   The prisoners were remanded.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FIRST MAPS OF AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE FIRST MAPS OF AMERICA.   Musty with the cobwebs of 400 years, there have just been found in the castle of Wolfegg, Wurtemberg, the first maps that ever contained the name and geographical outlines of America. The maps were discovered by the Rev. Joseph Fischer, a priest, who is professor of geography in Felkirch, the capital of the Austrian province of Vorarlberg. They bear respectively the dates of 1507 and 1516. They are in a state of remark- able preservation. The earliest is believed to have been drawn under the personal supervision of Columbus. German geographers consider this find very important. For years the maps were regarded as hopelessly lost. Nordenekjold, in his last work, referred to their existence as a legend.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIREMAN AND LIVE WIRES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

  FIREMAN AND LIVE WIRES.     The alleged danger to firemen playing on live wires has been investigated by M. G. Semenza. He finds that a current of 3600 volts will give a perceptible sensation through 11ft. of a ½in. water jet, but the shock is quite endurable for a length of one yard. He concludes that it is prac- tically impossible for a fireman to receive a severe shock without actually touching the wire with the nozzle.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PEER'S PRISON LIFE. EARL RUSSELL TELLS OF HIS HOLLOWAY EXPERIENCES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A PEER'S PRISON LIFE. EARL RUSSELL TELLS OF HIS HOLLOWAY EXPERIENCES.   For an hour and a half Earl Russell, who was accompanied by Lady Russell, entertained the members of the Pharos Club, London, the other night, with an account of his recent prison ex- periences. When he reached Holloway, he said, he learned that his cell had been prepared for him before the case was even heard. He was weighed, and he admitted that when he was re- leased he was fatter, though he did not consider that he was in better condition. The officials asked him what was his religion. He said he was an Agnostic, and they entered him on the card as a Protestant. (Laughter.) He went to the chapel for variety until the parson, whom he could not see from the little pen in which he and other prisoners were confined, treated them to a sermon one day. The substance of the sermon was that there must always be rich and poor and all other classes, and that it was a fine sight to see the poor peasant cree...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LUNATIC'S TERRIBLE DEED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A LUNATIC'S TERRIBLE DEED. A terrible occurrence is reported from the lunatic asylum of Ste. Marie (Privas, Ardeche). Two female inmates of the asylum, aged 31 and 42 years respectively, began to quarrel one night. Both had been strapped down in their beds for the night, but the younger of the two succeeded in unfastening a buckle and releasing herself. She threw herself on her companion, and with her teeth attacked the face of the unfortunate creature. When the keepers arrived they found the latter in a dying state, her nose, mouth, and chin having been gnawed away, and the skin of the forehead torn off.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GIRL BACHELORS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

GIRL BACHELORS. Here is a condensed romance that certainly ought to be made into a three-volume novel, and with the more reason in that three couples are concerned (says Clara Belle, In "Modern So- ciety"):— Three girls whom I know were solemnly bound not to marry, though I suppose I do not need to mention what would be taken as a matter of course. Having comfortable means, they were able to maintain a first-rate house in good style, and they became very popular in their circle. Of course, men were allowed at receptions and teas, and were not thrown down the steps when they came to make ordinary calls. Now the singular fact is that there were three men bachelors who were on the girls' list, and these three men made up their joint minds that the three girls would make excellent wives, and ought to marry. I believe it was a general pro- position at first, but in time the men came to see that it really devolved upon them to solve it. If they had a mission in life it was to become the h...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MILLIONAIRE PEER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A MILLIONAIRE PEER. The young Marquis of Bute comes into his huge property next year. Everybody has heard of the vast incomes raked in every year by the Westminsters aud the Bedfords, but the Bute family is hardly second to any. The fortune of the Marquis will amount to a capital of between £5,000,000 and £6,000,000 ster- ling. It is a mistake to suppose that most of this money is derived from the Scotch property belonging to the family; it comes, as a matter of fact, from rich coal mines in Wales, and the docks at the great port of Cardiff. The career of the present Marquis has been so far uneventful, mainly owing to his health, which has always been rather delicate. Still, he is fond of sports, and especially of yachting. He has also his father's religious turn of mind, and travelled last year through Palestine, where his father left him a few acres of property in the environs of Jerusalem.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THREATENING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THREATENING. "Is your mistress in, Mary?" inquired the head of the house, as he came home. "No, sorr. The dressmaker spoilt her new silk, an' she's gone there to see about it." "W-h-e-w!"' whistled the old man uneasily. "Just say to her that I am called away on im- portant business, and won't be home until late."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IF SANDY CLAWS WAS PA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

IF SANDY CLAWS WAS PA.   I've often thought what fun't would be If Sandy Claws was pa. He surely would be good to me, If Sandy Claws was pa. He'd let me see the million toys He makes fer little girls and boys; An' every single winter's day I'd ketch on to the reindeer sleigh, An' he'd be good an' wouldn't mind, An' jes p'tend that he was blind. An' wouldn't never "whip behind," If Sandy Claws was pa. The reindeer 'd take us 'way up high, If Sandy Claws was pa. They'd trot right through the air an' sky, If Sandy Claws was pa. An' pa would tell me how the deer Could do a thing so awful queer, An' why they stay up in the air Without balloons to keep 'em there; He'd tell me how they fly all night Up past the stars so big an' bright, Without a single wing in sight, If Sandy Claws was pa. The pole explorers would be blue, If Sandy Claws was pa. We'd find the pole before they do, If Sandy Claws was pa. Fer we'd go there jes like a streak; It wouldn't take us half a week To mak...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GENIUS AND GOUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

GENIUS AND GOUT. Mr. Havelock Ellis, in the course of his re- searches into the causes of death of great men, and into the ailments to which they are subject, finds that gout is a preponderating ailment of genius. The list given of the victims of gout is a long and interesting one. It includes John Milton, William Harvey, Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, Savage Landor, W. R. Hamilton, and last, though by no means least, Darwin him- self. Epilepsy has long been known, also, as an ailment associated with a high order of brain. Napoleon, Mohammed, Lord Herbert of Cher- bury, and Hamilton are cited as examples of the epileptic tendency. Julius Caesar might prob- ably have been added to the list, while Sweden- borg is claimed by alienists as also belonging to the epileptic division.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO AVENGE HIS SON'S DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TO AVENGE HIS SON'S DEATH.   With the desire to avenge the death of his only son, shot by the Boers last year, the Rev. R. E. Barr, of Tacoma, California, will shortly leave for South Africa to join the British army. For the past two years he has been rector of the Episcopal churches at Whatcom and New- haven, and is well known throughout the North- west. Mr. Barr's son was killed in an engagement in which the Boers greatly outnumbered the British, and it is alleged that they behaved with extreme brutality. Ever since receiving the news Mr. Barr has had a strong desire to go to South Africa to fight, and has sold his property to obtain the funds for his trip.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THREE SYSTEMS OF ELECTRIC TRACTION. LOCOMOTIVE SYSTEM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THREE SYSTEMS OF ELECTRIC   TRACTION.   LOCOMOTIVE SYSTEM.   This method of operating trains is borrowed from steam railroad practice. For the same weight of train the motors used would be larger than in the case of the multiple unit system, and so their efficiency would be higher. Also the weight of the motor equipment could be made less. An objection to its use is that, to obtain the adhesion necessary for rapid acceler- ation, the locomotive must be made very heavy, increasing the dead weight. At the termini, head and tail switching must be used unless a loop is employed. MOTOR CAR SYSTEM. The use of a motor car and trailers is a kind of a cross between the foregoing and the multiple unit system. In principle it is locomotive which carries passengers, and so utilises part of the load hauled to obtain adhesion between the wheels and track, being in this respect superior to a locomotive. When two or more motor cars are used, switching operatio...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TEMPERING THERMOMETER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TEMPERING THERMOMETER. A German method of tempering a thermometer     consists of placing it in a coil of platinum wire,     which is heated by an electric current, and slowly     cooled by a resistance gradually inserted by     clockwork.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IS A BICYCLE A CARRIAGE? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

IS A BICYCLE A CARRIAGE?   In an action brought before Mr. Justice Wright in the King's Bench Division, London, recently, by a Mr. Simpson, a member of the Cyclist Touring Club, against the Teignmouth and Shal- don Bridge Company, the point at issue was whether a person crossing the bridge, either riding or with a bicycle, was liable to pay a penny or twopence. The contention of the plain- tiff was that the bicycle was not a carriage within the meaning of the Act under which the company acquired their powers, which provided that all vehicles on springs, etc.; were to be charged 6d a wheel and 2d a horse. The learned Judge said that if he was to decide whether or not a bicycle was a carriage hung on springs, he must have further evidence; but, dealing with the case apart from that, he could not, without doing violence to the section of the Act, say that a bicycle came within the words applying to vehicles drawn by horses or other beasts of draught. The twopenny toll whic...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROUGH LUCK! [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ROUGH LUCK! As vulgar people phrase it:—   Our opponents' "cake is dough,"   For their (e)leven couldn't raise it, though we cooked it nicely, too; But our Duff turned out the toughest They had tackled yet, but O! 'Twas Saturday's heavy damper put the "kybosh" on the crew. JIMMY.   The Scottish golden eagles are as fine as any in     the world. The same species is found in Algiers,     but of a much smaller and lighter build.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW PROJECTILE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A NEW PROJECTILE. Our naval authorities are ever on the alert to secure the latest and most effective inventions for perfecting our means of defence on the high seas, and thereby maintaining the time-honored supremacy of the British Navy. And assuredly the new shell which we are enable to illustrate is a thing for us to be proud of and for our enemies to hold in wholesome awe and re- spect. Unimposing and plain in appearance though it is, it is nevertheless one of the most frightful in- struments of destruc- tion ever devised by the mind of man. Its mechanism and contents—which, of         course, are dead secrets —are amazing, from the point of view of perfec- tion, the whole being constructed as wonder- fully and carefully as a watch. What possibilities— or, rather, what breaches—it may open   up you may gather from the fact that it has successfully sus- tained the test of pierc- ing 12in. of the best hardened armor....

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERPLEXING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PERPLEXING.   The General: "And what are you going to be   when you grow up, young man?"   Bobbie: "Well, I can't quite make up my   mind. I don't know which would be nicest—a   soldier, like you, or a sailor, like Mr. Smithers."   —"Punch."     In Italy Sundays are usually preferred for mar-   riages when the principals have never been mar-   ried before. Widows, however, respect an old   custom by marrying on Saturdays.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Beauty to Order. WRINKLES REMOVED AND DIMPLES CREATED. (DR. FOWLER, IN THE SAN FRANCISCO "CALL.") [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Beauty to Order. WRINKLES REMOVED AND DIMPLES CREATED. (DR. FOWLER, IN THE SAN FRANCISCO "CALL.") ' People who have no physical deformities can not realise how distressing even the slightest of them is to the owner. I have known sensitive girls whose pleasure in society was spoiled by a morbid sensitiveness about outstanding ears or disfiguring facial lines. These things lie within the power of surgery to remedy. The mask treatment is sufficient in many cases. Where it is not, surgery must be sub- stituted. No woman need resign herself to the fact that she must always have freckles, sagging cheeks, or hanging eyelids. Those defects can be re- moved very easily. The surgical treatment for tightening up loose   OPERATION TO COR- RECT SAGGING CHEEK. cheeks is partly shown here by photo- graphs of the actual operations. You will notice in one picture that the subject is being treated for sagging cheeks. On the side of the face, just in front of the ear, a very small section...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ELEPHANT-CATCHER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

AN ELEPHANT-CATCHER. An elephant-catcher rather than a cow-catcher seems to be needed in India. On the railroad between Bengal and Assam, according to the "Railroad Gazette," as the superintendent of the line was making an inspection trip, while passing through the great Nambar forest, the train came to a stop with a jolt that threw the travellers out of their berths. The train had run into a herd of wild elephants, which were trotting down the track, the last of which had both hind legs broken, and was thrown into the ditch, while the engineer counted seven others which got away. This is not the first time that wild elephants have got on the track, and ordi- nary fences and cattle-guards are no protec- tion.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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