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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. G5 tlio journey in an incredibly short space of time. Arriving on the scene they found that no preparation had yet been made. General Sullivan com manded the whole of the land forces; the Count D'Estaing, the fleet of the allies. Immediately after the arrival of the Americans, the English volun tarily burned three of their own frigates rather than yield them. Then arose that unfortunate factional disturbance concerning Rhode Island, which caused feelings of groat warmth at that day, and oven in this is represented in our histories according to the temper of the historian. Lafayette in his Memoirs, (published by his family, in London, 1837) gives a succinct account of the trouble. After D'Estaing had forced his way to Newport, the English fleet, under Lowe, cut its cables and fled. D'Estaing pursued and was on the point of engaging the enemy when a violent storm arose dispersing his ships. His own vessel, the Langucdoc, deprived of both masts and rudder, and sepa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

G6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. pecfc of renewal of hostilities, Lafayette believed he could more effectually serve American interests by returning to France and arousing the Court and Ministry toward extending more ade quate aid. He wished also to again look upon his wife, children and friends. To this end he applied for leave of absence, which was at once granted by the United States Congress. Not only this but it was resolved that a magnificently ornamented sword should be presented him by their min ister in France, and that he should be transported back in the finest American ship then on the sea, the Alliance, carrying thirty-six guns. Before he reached Boston, where he was to em bark, after a horseback ride of four hundred miles through the autumn rain, he was stricken down with an inflammatory fever, and for awhile his life was despaired of. Washington came every day to see him, and detailed Dr. Cockran, Director of the armjr hosj)itals, to give him every attention. After three month...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

fHti INDIAN ADVOCATE. (37 commercial towns; there attempting to form a coalition between France and Spain, witli a result that the two nations should fall upon England a plan which only failed through the tardiness of tho Spanish ministry. Again we see him ay but succeeding in" engaging the navy of tho Swedish king in the American cause, while secretly he is at work fomenting rebellion in Ireland against the English throne. Wo have this upon the very highest possible authority. From St. Jean d' Angoly, near Rochefort harbor, on June 12, J 770, he wrote to Washington all these in detail, adding: Besides the good dispositions of Spain, Ireland is a good denl tired of English tyranny. I, in confidence, tell you that the scheme of my heart would be to make her as free and independent as A merica. have formed some private .relations there. God grant that we may succeed and the era of . . oonti freedom at length arrive for the happiness of mankind! I shall know more about Ireland in a few...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

68 fHE InDiAn adVocai. ES" TT m j&SSBSSSZ "" " i!SRBMI "ST. JOSEPHS RETREAT." The above named Academy is located about two miles west of Guthrie, and commands an extensive view of the city of Guthrie and the surrounding country. It was erected in 1892, and since the opening term, it has been well patron ized by the residents of the Territory, and young ladies from elsewhere. The Academy is under the immed iate supervision of the Superioress of the Retreat, assisted by an efficient corps of teachers members of the same Order. The Rev. Mother's many years' ex perience has rendered her thoroughly capable of that most difficult and im portant task educating the young. The Curriculum embraces the usual English academic course, with foreign languages, music, painting, etc., etc. The Academy is expressly for young ladies. There is, however, a Prepara tory Department for those whose edu cation has been neglected, and for children. Every attention is paid to the moral as well as the inte...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

I'HE INDIAN ADVOCATE, GO The Most Precious Blood. Among those devotions which we might term modern, because they are more universally understood and prac ticed in our time, is the devotion of the Precious Blood. Not many years have elapsed since the feast in honor of this Precious Blood was instituted and assigned to the first Sunday in July. Even a passing thought will convince us how appropriate the feast and the devotion of the Precious Blood must appear, and a longer meditation re veals to us the vastness of mysteries contained in this one word, The Precious Jilood. Whether we consider its infinite intrinsic value or its prodigal shedding unto the last drop, or its boundless elficacy or its supreme importance over all things on earth, or again its price less value for the redemption of man, on all sides interminable vistas of brightest refulgence enchant our vision and challenge our wonder and worship. As a sevenfold stream of sin in the seven capital sources thereof deluged the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. This sevenfold stream of the Most Precious Blood was not to cease flowing at the death of Christ. It was destined to bo a perennial course and to expand into a broad sea embracing all the earth and all time. The sevenfold channel through which the Precious Blood for ever courses, are the seven Holy Sacra ments in the Church of Christ. These holy sacraments conduct the stream of the Precious Blood, shed on Calvary for all mankind, to each individual soul. To use another simile, we may aptly consider the limpid stream in its effects, a bath for the soul of man. As the natural bath cleanses, heals and strengthens the body so this Precious Blood continually produces the same effects in the soul through the seven holy sacraments. The first effect is cleansing from impurities; this holy bath operates in the sacraments of Baptism and Penance, where it washes away the stain of sin. As the natural bath soothes and heals the wounds of the body, so this spiritual bath, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 Tjfc Indian dVocatc Is a Quarterly Review, published by the llcnedlctino Fathers of the Indian Tcr., to plead the cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilisation. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress In education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be uved for educating and converting the Indians of tho Terrltoiy. Till'. INDIAN advocatj:, Sacred Heart P. O , Okla. Ter. AlTltoVKl) nv RiflHT Kev TIIEO. MKERSCHAKUT, Vicar Apostolic of Oklahoma ani Indian Tkkkitoiiv. A Quarterly Review, entered at tho Sacreil Heart Post Oilico ui Oklahoma Territory, as ecoiid-class matter. Subscriptions M Cents per Year. Shiplc Copies 7.1 Cents. JULY, 1809. Editorial and Local. There is no vacat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. It is said that the first Americans in Samoa were " missionaries.' ' it was a fatal day for the Samoans, when these intriguers landed on their shores. They have sown dissension and brought calamity among a mild and docile people, and now expose them to the exterminating greed of Anglo-Saxon-ism. A young orang-outang was recently "christened" in Kansas Citj', Mo., the keeper pouring the water and repeating the words of the Christian formula for baptism. The newspapers say that "a large audience was present." The Advocate's feelings about this are admirably expressed by the Pilot: "Among the bipeds taking part in that blasphemous farce there was just one entitled to sympathy, and that was the innocent (quadruped) ape that found himself in such degraded company." It has been said of some races that they are 'invincible in peace, invisible in war. But of the Irish race, it may well be said, visible in peace, invin cible in war; for upon investigation it has been ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 73 nineteenth century refinement; and so we plant one rank weed after another in our forest till they enlace each other in their rapid growth, and presently no ray of light comes through the en tangled brunches. The evil is perhaps its own remedy at last, for we see then in our dreary extremity that there is no middle way. Not only the luxurious and rank weeds but also, "Our cedars must all round us ere we see the light behind." If wo have learned this at last, by the time we are old, the setting sun may still shine in upon us and gild our white hairs and the evening of our days. But it is little we can do then for other hearts and other lives. Let us not have to strike our breasts in our futile regrets, and to our mea culpa add the bitter sigh: "Si jeuncsse savait, si vieillessc pouvait.' liercrie. Still, This world's a pretty good sort of world, Taking it altogether. In spite of grief and sorrow we meet, In spite of the gloomy weather, There are friends to lov...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

74 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Lot us now see how we may realize during the coming season, at least a few of the long anticipated pleasures of vacation. Above all, we should endeavor to omit no opportunity of contributing to the happiness of those around us; what jor will it not give a loyal-hearted child to lend a helping hand to the cherished and devoted father and mother, whose health has perhaps been undermined in the effort to keep him or her at school. Such employments afford not only rest to the mind and the needed exercise to the body, but furnish also occasions for putting in practice the many maxims of virtue imparted to us by our masters and spiritual directors at school. Then we may also find time for innocent and pleasing recreations which are beneficial to both mind and body. Let us take care however to indulge only in those permitted. by our parents, our conscience and our pocket-book, always on the condition that wo do not allow the desire of pleasure to silence the call of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 Eve by her sin was bound to pay and did pay. Ages passed from the time of Eve, and men grew worse instead of bettor, until tho advent of a peasant girl for Mary, although of the royal house of David, had given up her own kindred, had given up tho world at the age of thirteen, and dedicated her virginity to Almighty God. Marriages were honorable among tho Jews, and every Jewish "mother hoped for the sublim.e honor of giving birth to the Messiah; but Mary was the elect of God, although she had almost refused, for we are told that she became troubled, for she had already dedicated her virginity to God. What wonder is it then that Mary should be assumed into heaven. Our Blessed Lord is man as well as He is God. Mary gave him those eyes; those up-lifted hands of His, He took from Mary; His Sacred Heart He took from Mary; tho Heart that beats now in tho tabernacle Ho took from Mary; and what wonder when the Son raised up His Mother and placed her at His right hand?...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. INDIAN LORE. Cusi: or Tin: Nkb As is generally the case with Indian wars, it originated in the unauthorized intrusion of lawless whites on lands which the Indians claimed as theirs, by virtue of occupancy from time im memorial. The Nez Perces, whom all authorities agree in representing as a superior tribe of Indians, originally inhabited the valleys of Clearwater and Salmon rivers in Idaho, with the country extending west of Snake river into Washington and Oregon as far as the Blue Mountains. They are first officially noticed in the report of the Indian Commissioner for 1S43, where they are described as "noble, industri ous, sensible," and well disposed toward the whites, while "though brave as Ciosar, the whites have nothing to dread at their hands in case of their dealing out to them what they conceive to be right and equitable." It being deemed advisable to bring them into more direct relations with the United States, the agent who made the report called t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 picturesque people, after keeping us waiting long enough for effect, came in sight from up the valley from the direction of their temporary camp just ahove the company gardens They drew near to the hollow square of the post and in front of the small company to he interviewed. Then they struck up their song. They were not armed except with a few tomahawk pipes that could he smoked with the peaceful tohacco or penetrate the skull hone of an enemy at the will of the holder. Yet somehow this wild sound produced a strange ellect. It made one feel glad that there were hut fifty of them and not five hundred. It was shrill and searching, sad, like a wail, and yet defiant in its close. The Indians swept around outside the fence and made the entire circuit, still keeping up the song as tney rode. The b ildings hrokc the refrain into irregular buhhlings of sound until the ceremony was completed." (JToward 1.) At this conference the spokesman insisted according to their ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

78 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Joseph led his little band up the Clear water and across the mountains into Montana, turning at Big Hole pass long enough to beat back his pursuers with a ' jss of sixty men; then on by devious mountain trails southeast into Yellow stone park, where he again turned on Howard and drove him back with additional men and horses; then out of Wyoming and north into Montana again, hoping to find safety on Cana dian soil, until intercepted in the neighborhood of the Yellowstone by Colonel Sturgis in front with fresh troops and a detachment of Crow scouts, with whom they sustained two more encounters, this time with heavy loss of men and horses to themselves; then again eluding their pursuers, this handful of ptirving and worn out warriors, now reduced to scarcely fifty able men, carrying their wounded and their helpless families, crossed the Missouri and entered the Bearpaw mountains. But new enemies were on their trail, and at last, when within fifty miles of the la...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 to the hills and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children and see how many of them I can find. Maybe T shall find them among the dead! Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever." J. Moonky. PONTIAC. To Pontiac must be ascribed the highest position among the leaders of the Algonquin race. Born the son of a chief, ho became in turn the chief of his own people, the Ottawas, whom it is said ho commanded on the occasion of Braddock's defeat. For this or other services in behalf of the French ho had received marks of distinguished consideration from Montcalm himself. By reason of his natural ability, his influence was felt and respected where ever the name of his tribe was spoken, while to his dignity as chief he added the character of high priest of the powerful secret order of the Mide. Parkman S.) Now in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ii t I 4, THE CATHOLIC INDIAN SCHOOLS. There is a vast difference between profession and practice. We boast of our country as "The land of the free and the home of the brave," and as the chosen dwelling place of justice and equality. The treatment accorded to the Indians by our government does not harmonize with our boasted pro fessions. By government enactment the various religious bodies wfcre- encouraged to erect schools for the education of the Indian children. Appropriations were made for the purpose of paying a per capita amount for each Indian child educated. This was considered fair and just by all, and hence no complaint was made. Tho various religious bodies erected buildings and entered enthusiastically on the work. Miss Katherine Drexel and her sis ters, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Lenora, contributed about $1,500,000 for Cath olic school buildings. All went well for a time. The Indians love tho "Black-robes" and the Church; they remember with affecti...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 science How littlo is given in the annual collection for those poor people bereft of their heritage! How far will $60,000,000 go to keep up the Indian schools? Why not have a society sim ilar to that of the Propagation of the Faith to help the good work along? No doubt many Catholics would be willing to give from one dollar to ten dollars a year to the poor Indians and to those who are sacrificing their lives for those children of the forest. No doubt the bishops will be glad to autho rize such a society. We present in conclusion a petition to Congress lately presented by the Sioux Indians. All will agree that it is pathetic and simple in its plea for justice. We can add nothing to its forco: "We Catholics of the Sioux nation most re spectfully and humbly ask and beg of the United States Congress, now assembled in Washington, to revise the late law concerning the religious schools (commonly called contract schools), according to which these schools should not...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. MLw ft seasonable allusions or topics which may irritate; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and never wearisome. He makes light of favors when he does them, and seems to be receiving when he is conferring. He never speaks of himself, except when compelled; never defends himself by a mere retort; he has no ears for slander or gossip, is scrupulous in imputing motives to those who interfere with him, and interprets everything for the best. He is never mean or little in his disputes, never takes unfair advantages, never mistakes personalities or sharp sayings for argu ments, or insinuates evil which he does not say out. " From a long-sighted prudency, he observes the maxim of the ancient sage, that we should ever conduct our selves towards our enemy, as if he were one day to be our friend. " He has too much good sense to be affronted at insults. He is too well employed to remember injuries, and too indolent to bear malice. He is patient, forbearing and res...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 Church and without it; in holy men and in profligates; they form the beau-ideal of the world; they partly assist and partly distort the development of the Catholic. They may subserve the edu cation of a St. Francis de Sales, or a Cardinal Pole; they may be the limits of contemplations of a Shaftsbury or a Gibbon. Basil and Julian were fellow students at the schools of Athens; and one became the saint and doctor of the Church, the other a scoffing and relent less foe." EDUCATION. In the last issue of the Advocate I wrote an article on "Education," and at the request of some of its readers, I will continue this in the July number. As there are so many fine books and articles on Education in fact we are overstocked with conflicting schemes and opinions it seems unnecessary to add more, yet as we have a free country and free press, there cannot be much harm in each individual expressing his or her own private opinion on matters which are so closely connected with...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

84 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. never cultivated principle. Hence the saying, if we find a man as perfect as human perfection can make him in all his physical actions, we exclaim with great admiration: "He is a man of great character." Character is the reflection of the soul of man, its mani festations are seen and felt through all the physical actions of his life, and to acquire great and lasting character of soul, we must seek aid from on high through those sacred channels Al mighty God has established to aid and perfect man in the formation of his character or morals, and this aid can be obtained in no other way than through the softening influence of religion. What little interest is manifested by thousands of teachers in trying to impress on the mind or soul of the pupil the necessity of walking in the path of duty and rectitude, as it were, to soar above the grovelings of earth, and to seek in all emergencies aid and strength from above. I have spoken to hundreds of teachers on this s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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